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Full text of "Quincy Sun Jan - June 1974"




GRAPHIC MICROF1 

a SPaUldinq company 



ON ROUTE 128 AT 1S60 TRAPELO RD., WALTHAM, MASS. 021'j4 



JA/// 







Vol. 6 No. 16 
Thursday, January 3, 1974 



2*t*cf* Omm TCttkb, 7U*4j*JH* 



Thomas Crane Public Library 
-Be* 379 




qujncy, Mass. 02169 

Inaugural Ceremonies, 
Ball Set For Jan. 7- Page 3 




LIMITED WOOD CUTTING during energy crisis is being allowed in the 
Blue Hilts. Demonstrating how easy it is here are Mrs. Virginia Keefe of 
Littlefield St., Houghs Neck and her children, Valerie, 10, Gregory, 7, 
Lizabeth, 12, and Lori, 15. With a cord of fire place wood going for 



about $80 these days, cutting your own wood is not only good fun and 
exercise, but a real money saver. See story on Page 2. 

[Quincy Sun Photo by Laban Whittaker] 



Page 2 Quincy Sun Thursday, January 3, 1974 



yrill YEARS GREETINGS 
Mb If address for 

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INLAID LINOLEUM 

FASHION FLOORS 



528-530 Washington St.^ 

QUINCY POINT. 471-2865 



[formerly at 1043 Hancock St.] 




Placque To Be Unveiled 

2 Mayors, 14 Judges In Memorial 
Tribute To Harry Pavan Sunday 



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The late Harry Pavan, who 
was city solicitor when he died 
Nov. 2, 1972, at the age of 61, 
will be honored Sunday at 2:30 
p.m. with a placque in his 
memory at ceremonies in the 
City Council chambers. 

The ceremonies will be 
attended by his daughter, Dr. 
Deborah Pavan Langston; former 
Mayor James R. Mclntyre, who 
appointed him solicitor in 1966; 
Mayor Walter J. Hannon; and 
14, possibly 15, judges in 
judicial robes. 

"Harry was city solicitor at a 
very complex and busy time in 
the history of Quincy," said City 
Councillor-Sen. Arthur H. 
Tobin, who was Pavan's law 
associate for many years. 

"It was a time when the city 
had to have someone in the 
office who was astute, with legal 
capacity, knowledge of the law 
and compassion for people. He 
was the right man at the right 
time for the job." 

Tobin and Pavan's personal 
secretary, Mrs. Muriel Chandler, 
and his City Hall secretary, Miss 
Violet Pace, were instrumental 
in lining up Sunday's 
ceremonies. 

Judges who have accepted 
invitations to the ceremonies 
include: 

Robert S. Prince, James A. 
Mulhall [retired] and Gertrude 
R. Halloran [retired], all of 
Quincy District Court. The three 
of them will be seated on the 
podium. 




HARRY PAVAN 

Alvin C. Tamkin, presiding 
justice of Hingham District 
Court; Robert M. Ford, justice 
of Norfolk Probate Court; 
Alfred L. Podolski, chief justice 
of Norfolk Probate Court. 

James R. Lawton, presiding 
justice of Plymouth Probate 
Court; Henry H. Chmielinski Jr., 
John J. McNaught and James 
Lynch, all justices of the 
Superior Court. 

Joseph F. Feeney, special 
justice of South Boston District 
Court; Bernard Cohen, special 
justice of Brockton District 
Court; George N. Hurd Jr., 
associate justice of Brockton 
District Court; and Lewis T. 
Whitman, special justice of the 
District Court of East Norfolk. 

The 15th judge, who will be 



there if previous commitments 
permit, is Paul C. Reardon of 
Quincy, chief, justice of the 
Massachusetts Supreme Judicial 
Court. 

Also in attendance will be 
City Solicitor Richard J. 
McCormick, Stephen T. Keefe 
Jr. and John W. Sharry, all of 
whom served as assistant city 
solicitors under Pavan. 

Rabbi David Jacobs of 
Temple Beth El, of which Pavan 
was a member, and Rabbi Jacob 
Mann of Beth Israel Synagogue, 
will deliver the invocation and 
the benediction respectively. 

Dennis F. Ryan, Quincy 
District Court Clerk will act as 
master of ceremonies while the 
main address will be given by 
Judge Chmielinski, whose law 
office adjoined that of Pavan for 
many year*. 

Dr. Langston will unveil the 
placque, containing a bronzed 
bust of her father, and 
McCormick, Keefe and Sharry 
will deliver eulogies. 

The money for the placque 
and other honors came from 
donations ranging from $1 up to 
$100 from Pavan's former 
associates in law and around 
City Hall. 

The other honors will include 
two memorial lights to be placed 
in Temple Beth El and Beth 
Israel Synagogue to perpetuate 
his memory in the prayers of the 
congregations on the anniversary 
of his death. 



You Can Cut Wood In Blue Hills Area 



A limited amount of wood 
cutting by private individuals is 
being allowed in the Blue Hills 
and Middlesex Fells Reservations 
of the Metropolitan District 
Commission parks and 
recreation division. 



W 




WATCH 

IT GROW 
WITH 

US 
IN 1974 



Robert B. Williams, parks and 
recreation director, said one-day 
permits are available through the 
district park superintendents. 

The Blue Hills Reservation 
includes wooded areas in 
Braintree, Canton, Milton, 
Quincy, and Randolph. 

Applicants for one-day 
permits in the Blue Hills, should 
contact Andrew Poskus at 7 
Brush Hill Road, Milton 
(698-0722) in the Blue Hills 
Reservation. 

The public may go to any 
reservation to cut wood, but 



MUSCULAR 
DYSTRUPHY 



certain regulations must be 
obeyed. For instance, individuals 
must take note of all 'motor 
vehicles excluded' areas. No 
timber that is standing may be 
cut. No commercial woodcutters 
are allowed. No one may cut 
wood more than 100 feet from 
the road. 

Each person cutting wood 
must carry the permit issued by 
the park superintendent at all 
times while on the reservation, 
and the permits will specify the 
exact area in which the cutting 
may be done. No chain saws 
may be used. Wood harvesting 
will be allowed in the specified 
reservations from Mondays 
through Fridays between the 
hours of 8 a.m. and 4:30 p.m. 



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HIGH INTEREST RATES IN 1974 



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Thursday, January 3, 1974 Quincy Sun Page 3 



Inaugura l Ceremonies, Ball Jan. 7 

Hannon To Take Second Term Oath; Tobin Council President 



By TOM HENSHAW 

Mayor Walter J. Hannon will 
be inaugurated for his second 
term Monday [Jan. 7). at 10 
a.m. in the Quincy Vocational 
Technical School gymnasium 
before an audience that could 
include Sen. Edward M. 
Kennedy, Gov. Francis W. 
Sargent and Congressman James 
A. Burke. 

Invitations have been 
extended to Kennedy and' 
Sargent as well as Congressman 
James Burke and the city's three 
living former mayors, Thomas S. 
Burgin, Amelio Delia Chiesa and 
James R. Mclntyre. 

Members of the City Council, 
including five new councillors, 
also will be sworn in and 
immediately will hold their first 
meeting, which includes the 
election of a council president. 

Arthur H. Tobin is expected 
to be re-elected Council 
President. 

Some 2,000 people are 
expected to attend the inaugural 
ball and reception Monday 
evening at 8 p.m. in the 
Voc-Tech gym during which 
Mayor Hannon and the nine 
councillors will greet guests on 
their arrivals. 

Both the inaugural ceremony 
and the City Council meeting 
will be called to order by City 
Clerk John M. Gillis, after which 
students from Quincy and North 
Quincy High Schools will lead 
the salute to the flag. 

The Quincy High School 
Concert Choir will sing the 
National Anthem and the 
invocation will be delivered by 
the Rev. Edward Flaherty of St. 
Ann's Church, Wollaston. 

City Clerk Gillis will 
administer the oath of office to 
Mayor Hannon who will then 
deliver his inaugural address. 

After a prayer led by the Rev. 
John Graham of United First 
Parish Church, the members of 
the City Council will be sworn in 
and will elect a Council 
president. 

Members of the Council are 
Leo J. Kelly, Ward 1 ; Clifford H. 
Marshall, Ward 2; John J. Lydon 
Jr., Ward 3; James A. Sheets, 
Ward 4; Warren A. Powers, Ward 
5; Dennis E. Harrington, Ward 6; 
Joseph J. LaRaia, at-large; John 
J. Quinn, at-large and Arthur H. 
Tobin, at-large. 

Harrington, Kelly, Lydon, 
Powers and Sheets are 
newcomers to the Council. 

Also on the Council's first 
agenda of the new year: 

Election of a clerk of 
committees; swearing in of the 
clerk of committees; adoption of 
Council rules for 1974-75; 
authorization to clerk of council 
to have Council calendars 
printed; authorization for the 
Mayor to execute deeds for 
Adams Temple and the School 
Fund. 

Authorization for the Clerk of 



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Council to have Council rules 
printed; election of two 
members to the City Hospital of 
Quincy Endowment Fund and 
two members to the Board of 
Managers of the Woodward 
Fund and Property; and 
nomination of two members to 
the Board of Managers of the 
Woodward Fund and Property. 

The Quincy High School 
Concert Choir, under the 
direction of Gale Harrison, will 
sing "O, Clap Your Hands", and 
the North Quincy High School 
Band, directed by David Watson, 
will play the "Masque". 

Rabbi Jacob Mann of Temple 
Beth Israel will deliver the 
benediction and the North 
Quincy High School band will 
conclude the ceremonies with a 
rendition of "God Bless 
America". 

The ceremonies will be video 
taped for future screening by 
students from the the 
Voch-Tech School and members 
of the Quincy High School Air 
Force Reserve Officers Training 
Corps will serve as Honor Guard. 



ARTHUR H. TOBIN 



All residents of the city have 
been invited to the inaugural ball 
and reception, for which John 
Foley and the Diplomats will 
provide music and entertainment 
from 8 p.m. to midnight. 

Members of the Inaugural Day 
Committee are Gordon McPhee, 
general chairman; Anne 
Minukas, coordinator, and 
Michael Priscella, decorating 
chairman. 

Members of the Liaison 
Committee include: 

Dr. Lawrence P. CreedOn, 
superintendent of schools; 
Edward Smith, assistant director 
of personnel of the Quincy 
public schools; John Gillis, city 
clerk; Alexander Smith, city 
auditor; John Browne, director 
of plant facilities of the Quincy 
Public Schools. 

Also Police Chief Francis 
Finn; Fire Chief Edward Barry; 
George Cole of the culinary arts 
division of the Voc-Tech School; 
and Gale Harrison, David Watson 
and Arthur Gillis, all of the 
Quincy Public Schools. 




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Don't miss our benefit performance* 



Page 4 Quincy Sun Thursday, January 3, 1974 




"Kissinger's job isn't to bring EVERYBODY together. ..I'm sure 
Liz and Dick decided on their own!" 

OPEN HOUSE 

You can cut your fuel needs 



By JAMES M. WOODARD 

Copley News Service 

The impact of the energy 
crisis is striking close to 
home. In fact, it's affecting 
our way of life inside our 
homes. 

The most obvious effect can 
be measured in goose-bumps 
and shivers. The temperature 
is being maintained at record 
low levels in an increasing 
number of households — in 
the interests of saving fuel, of 
course. 

Much fuel is indeed saved 
by lower temperatures. How- 
ever, there are other steps 
that could be even more effec- 
tive in the fuel conservation 
push. Fully insulated ceilings 
and walls, for example, can 
make a big difference in your 
total fuel consumption this 
winter. 

Other steps you could take 
now to reduce fuel needs are: 
(1) caulk or weather-strip 
around windows and door 
frames; (2) close the fire- 
place damper when your fire- 
place is not in use; and (3) 
tightly close off all spare 
rooms that are not in use. 

The thermostat setting 
should still be lowered if 
you're genuinely interested in 
maximum saving of fuel. It 
has been estimated that each 
degree (F) lower your room 
thermostat setting, you will 
save 2 to 3 per cent of fuel. By 
turning your night time set- 
ting down 10 degrees below 
the normal point, you could 
save as much as 7 per cent on 
fuel. 

It will be apparent to most 
that if all these steps were 
taken the home owner would 
save a substantial chunk of 
money as well as conserve en- 
ergy. 

The energy crisis is having 
a variety of effects on proper- 
ties and the reaPestate mar- 
ket. For example, many large 
apartment and condominium 
developments have sharply 
reduced their usage of outside 
lights at night. 



This effectively conserves 
energy and saves money for 
the owners, but worries many 
security-conscious residents. 
This concern is stimulating 
sales of burglar alarm sys- 
tems and other security de- 
vices. 

Even land values are af- 
fected. The gasoline shortage 
has boosted values of land 
parcels ripe for development 
in "close in" areas, and is re- 
ducing the rate of value ap- 
preciation of "far out" par- 
cels. Land suitable for recre- 
ational uses are particularly 
affected. 

The energy crisis will prob- 
ably be with us for quite a 
while. Real estate, like every- 
thing else, will just have to 
adjust. 

Q. Do all states offer some 
property tax relief to older 
citizens? 

A. Not all, but most states 
extend some form of relief on 
property taxes to the elderly 
and poor. 

Legislators are finally rec- 
ognizing the urgent need for 
special help to older folks who 
are locked into a fixed in- 
come. The fact that their 
cumulative voting power is 
becoming significantly 
stronger just might be a moti- 
vator. Five states passed such 
property tax relief legislation 
this year, laws were liberal- 
ized in another 14 states, and 
15 states expanded the tax 
break to renters as well as 
homeowners. 

Incidentally, the Census 
Bureau reports the fastest 
growing segment of U.S. 
population is the elderly. One 
out of three will be over 60 by 
1999. 

Q. What direction are home 
loan interest rates headed? 

A. A quote from Harry 
Schwartz, vice president of 
the Federal National Mort- 
gage Association: "We are in 
the process of a turnaround 
and will soon see an 8.5 per 
cent rate on mortgages." 



• Historic Moments 



COOUDGE DIED 

Calvin Coolidge, 30th presi- 
dent, died at age 60 on Jan. 5, 
1933. 

TEDDY ROOSEVELT 

Theodore Roosevelt, 26th 
president, died at age 60 on 
Jan. 6, 1919. 




Jack Anderson 

Pulitzer Prize Winner for National Reporting, «nd 
Syndicated Columnist for The Quincy Sun. 

• Soviets Playing Double Game 

# Boyle Safer In Jail 

m United We Stand . . . 



(Copyright, 1973, by United Feature Syndicate, Inc.) 



KENNEDY APPOINTED 

Joseph P. Kennedy was ap- 
pointed U.S. ambassador to 
Britain on Jan. 7, 1938. 

U.S. ELECTION 

The first U.S. presidential 
election was held on Jan. 7, 
1789. 



WASHINGTON - Secret 
intelligence reports warn 
that the Kremlin is playing a 
double game. Above the ta- 
ble, the Soviets are cooperat- 
ing with Secretary of State 
Henry Kissinger's efforts to 
settle the Middle East crisis. 
But under the table, the 
Soviets are stirring up the 
Arabs to tighten the econom- 
ic screws on the Western 
powers. 

The Kremlin is quietly urg- 
ing the Arrbs to continue the 
oil embargo, which has caus- 
ed economic tremors 
throughout the West. The 
Kremlin is also encouraging 
the Arabs to withdraw their 
oil billions from Western 
banks. This could throw the 
whole monetary system of 
the West into a tailspin. 

But there is even more 
ominous news in the secret 
dispatches. They warn that 
the Kremlin has issued or- 
ders to Communist parties in 
the West to exploit the eco- 
nomic unrest caused by the 
oil squeeze. 

Loyal Communists have 
been reminded, according to 
the Central Intelligence 
Agency, that Communism 
thrives on economic chaos. 
They have been instructed, 
therefore, to seize upon the 
d issat isfact ion of the 
workers, to organize strikes 
and to lead protests. 

If the secret reports are ac- 
curate, the Kremlin is taking 
full advantage of the sudden 
economic plight of Western 
Europe. Japan and the 
United Stales. 

Safer in 'Jail: Newspapers 
recently carried pictures of 
former mine workers' boss 
Tony Boyle being rolled off in 
a wheelchair to begin a jail 
sentence for illegal political 
contributions. 

He also faces charges of 
conspiracy in the 1970 
murder of his union rival. 
Jock Yablonski, and 
Yablonski's wife and 
daughter. I was the first to re- 
port in November 1970 that 
there was evidence Boyle was 
involved in the murder plot. 

Now the pictures of Boyle 
in a wheelchair have aroused 
sympathy for him. As pitiful 
as the wheelchair pictures 
may seem, however. Justice 
Department sources tell us 
Boyle will be safer in jail. 

During a routine check of 
his hospital room, searchers 
found that Boyle had been 
saving pills prescribed by his 
physicians. The officials 
believe he was planning 
another suicide attempt. He 
has been hospitalized since 
taking an overdose of drugs 
last fall. 

The murder trial will be 
coming up in 1974. Is Boyle fit 
to stand trial? The Justice 
Department officials believe 
he is. One said that, although 



TELEGRAPH DEBUT 

On Jan. 6, 1838, Samuel 
F. B. Morse and his partner 
Alfred Vail demonstrated 
their telegraph publicly for 
the first time. 

FLORIDA SECEDES 
Florida seceded from the 
Union on Jan. 10, 1861. 



Boyle's body may be frail, his 
mind is as tough as ever. 

Crucial Poker Game: Pen- 
tagon sources warn that a 
major North Vietnamese 
offensive is almost inevitable 
in 1974. North Vietnam now 
has roughly 200,000 troops, 
600 tanks and four airstrips 
ready for action in the South. 
This is a larger Communist 
force than the beleaguered 
South Vietnamese have ever 
faced. 

It brought Secretary of 
State Henry Kissinger back to 
Paris for another meeting 
with Le Due Tho. Almost a 
year after the two Nobel 
Peace Prize winners reached 
their tenuous cease-fire 
agreement, they met again in 
the shadow of the Eiffel 
Tower. 

Beh ind Tho's back, 
Kissinger called him "Duc- 
ky." But to his face, Kissinger 
was cordial and confident. 
Sources privy to their talks 
describe it as a game of bluff. 
For Kissinger had no real 
cards to play in this critical 
poker game. 

The American people want 
to stay out of Vietnam and 
Congress is unlikely to 
authorize any military ac- 
tion. So Kissinger had 
nothing to offer in the 
bargaining. 

Instead, he played on 
Hanoi's uncertainty about 
President Nixon. The North 
Vietnamese never expected 
the President to respond to 
their last offensive with a 
massive bombing attack. 
They were surprised again at 
his swift shipment of arma- 
ments to Israel during the re- 
cent Arab-Israeli fighting. 

Secretary Kissinger sought 
to keep the peace, therefore, 
by playing upon the North 
Vietnamese fears as to what 
the unpredictable Richard 
Nixon might do. 

United We Stand i Not since 
World War II have the 
Western nations been in such 
dire danger. The Arab oil 
squeeze is threatening the 
prosperity of all the in- 
dustrialized countries. They 
must cut petroleum con- 
sumption, thus risking 
depression, or pay the soar- 
ing price of foreign oil. 

Secretary of State Henry 
Kissinger has warned the 
West to stand together or fall 
apart. Only by working 
together, he has urged, can a 
worldwide disaster be avoid- 
ed. The alternative would 



leave every nation to scram- 
ble for itself. It was exactly 
this kind of fragmentation 
that led to the Great Depres- 
sion of the 1930s and World 
War II. 

The first requirement is to 
settle the Arab-Israeli con- 
flict. Kissinger has succeed- 
ed in bringing the Arabs and 
Israelis together at Geneva. 
This alone is a remarkable 
diplomatic achievement. 

But Kissinger has been 
unable to persuade the 
Western powers to adopt a 
united policy. The secret in- 
telligence reports tell of petty 
politics, bickering and back- 
biting among the North 
Atlantic nations. 

Even more disturbing, the 
intelligence reports carry 
news of frequent clashes bet- 
ween Israeli and Egyptian 
forces. The Egyptians have 
adopted a policy of making 
the Israelis pay for every day 
they delay their withdrawal. 
Egyptian snipers have been 
taking a deadly toll of Israeli 
soldiers. Egyptian comman- 
dos have also staged raids, 
which have led to firefights. 
Most of these incidents 
have been kept out of the 
newspapers. But they could 
torpedo the peace. 

Sinking a 'System ': An in- 
telligent shopper needs more 
than an eye for a bargain 
these days. He almost needs 
an economic degree to keep 
, up with gyrating food prices. 
Shortages and inflation 
were causing such price 
stretching last summer that a 
House subcommittee asked 
the Federal Trade Commis- 
sion to develop a process to 
help the beleagured con- 
sumer. The FTC is supposed 
to protect the public from ex- 
ploitation. 

FTC researchers, accor- 
dingly, developed and tested 
a system which should give 
consumers an accurate 
guideline for shopping. The 
system is so good that the 
FTC would be able to use it as 
evidence against a super- 
market accused of false ad- 
vertising. 

But there is one hangup. 
The new survey is being with- 
held by the FTC's Bureau of 
Consumer Protection. Heavy 
lobbying by the big chain 
stores has delayed, and possi- 
bly stopped, its implementa- 
tion. 

Meanwhile, the super- 
market shopper has been left 
to depend on his own wits by 
the agency that is supposed to 
protect him. 



Q#3 



Published weekly on Thursday by 

The Quincy Sun Publishing Company 

1601 Hancock St., Quincy, Massachusetts 02169 

Publisher and Editor 

Henry W. Bosworth, Jr. 

Advertising Director 

John B. Powers 

10</Per Copy - $3.50 Per Year ■ Out of State $4.50 Per Year 

Telephone: 471-3100 471-3101 471-3102 

Second-Class Postage Paid at Boston, Mass. 

MEMBER NEW ENGLAND PRESS ASSOCIATION 

The Quincy Sun assumes no financial responsibility for 

typographical errors in advertisements but will reprint that part of 

an advertisement in which the typographical error occurs. 




Thursday, January 3, 1974 Quincy Sun Page 5 



By HENRY BOSWORTH 

The name of the new City Council president will be a familiar 
one: Arthur H. Tobin. 

Insiders report Tobin has more than enough votes to succeed 
himself as council president at the inaugural meeting Jan. 7. 

They figure he has a firm bloc of seven or eight votes to hold onto 
the gavel. Only five votes are needed. He'll probably wind up with all 
nine votes before it's over. 

If Tobin hadn't been a candidate, the man who could have put it 
together was John Quinn, dean of the council in point of service. 

Tobin is already in Quincy's history book, holding the longevity 
record as council president. He has served four straight years and 
apparently will serve two more. 

No other councillor in the city's history has had that honor. 

IT DIDN'T HAPPEN and, as they say, a miss is as good as a mile, 
but Quincy came eye-lash close to a real mayoralty battle royal in 
the recent city election. 

For awhile there, Councillor Joseph LaRaia was seriously thinking 
of making a run. And, according to insiders, Council President 
Arthur Tobin was watching and waiting. 

If LaRaia had announced his candidacy, reliable City Hall sources 
now disclose, Tobin would have gotten into the race, too. 

So the preliminary election in November would have featured 
three big names: incumbent Walter Hannon, Tobin and LaRaia. 

Who would have won the two nominations is now nothing more 
than a matter of speculation. But it would have been a real 
interesting campaign. 

How would you have picked it? 

Hannon and Tobin, Hannon and LaRaia, or Tobin and LaRaia in 
the preliminary? And in the final showdown: Hannon over Tobin, 
Hannon over LaRaia, Tobin over Hannon, Tobin over LaRaia, 
LaRaia over Hannon, LaRaia over Tobin? 

Well, it didn't happen. BUT: 

It could actually come off in 1975. Those insiders are convinced 
that if LaRaia announces for mayor, Tobin will get into the fight. 

Never a dull moment in politics. 

*¥¥ 

WHICH REMINDS US: Dec. 4 may have been an unusual date for 
the Quincy City election but it was not the latest one ever held in 
the city. In fact, Quincy's very first election as a city came on the 
same date: Dec. 4, 1888. 

And when Mayor Walter Hannon takes his oath Jan. 7 it will be 
the 85th anniversary of Quincy's first inauguration. Charles H. 
Porter, Quincy's first mayor, took his oath Jan. 7, 1889. 

*¥¥ 

CHIP OF BLOC DEPT: Steve Mele, son of Red Sox special scout 
Sam Mele, is off to a good start as a member of the Dartmouth 
freshman basketball team. Steve, an outstanding player at 
Archbishop Williams, scored 18 points against Holy Cross and 16 
against Harvard in his first two games at Dartmouth. Steve is also a 
fine baseball prospect, playing both outfield and pitching. 

His Dad was a basketball star at N.Y.U. but decided on baseball 
for a career instead. Steve will be making his choice one of these 
days, too. Will it be basketball or baseball? Like his Dad, they say he 
can make it big in either. 

FORMER Quincy Fire Lt. Nick Malvesti just can't stay away from 
the smoke. He and wife, Agnes, are now living in Belleair Bluffs, 
Fla., just four miles outside of Clearwater. And Nick is now assistant 
fire chief there. 

NICE-GESTURE-DEPT: The Philip Heleotis Fund is now $13 
larger thanks to the Dental Technician Class students at Quincy 
Vocational-Technical School. The $13, turned over to the fund by 
Judie Lavoie, represents receipts from the class "penalty box". If a 
student uses the wrong terminology in class, the penalty is a 10-cent 
assessment. At Christmas time, the money is taken out of the box 
and donated to a worthy cause. 

OOPS! Speaking of the Heleotis Fund we had a typo boo-boo in 
last week's column. We mentioned that Phil's sister, Lynne, had been 
appointed a kindergarten teacher at the Furnace Brook School. Only 
it came out she was appointed a kindergarten student. Sorry about 
that, Lynne. 



Jk^U 




70 Youngsters Looking For Work 

You Can Now 'Rent-A-Kid' 
To Help Around The House 



By STEVE FERRARA 

Readying your home for the 
onslaught of winter and cleaning 
up the debris in the spring are 
time-consuming and tedious 
jobs. 

Sometimes busy people just 
can't get around to doing the 
work that has to be done. The 
Southwest Teen Council can 
help solve that problem for you. 

The Teen Council has 
established the "Rent-A-Kid" 
program, numbering about 70 
youngsters, mostly junior high 
school age, who are ready and 
willing to work. 

The Rent-A-Kid program is a 
kind of "you scratch my back, 
I'll scratch yours" deal. For a 
minimal fee you can hire a kid 
to clean those gutters you didn't 
have time for, or rake those 
leaves you don't want to find 
time for. 

By the same token you are 
keeping a young teenager busy, 
and even more important, 
employed. Kids in their early 
teens are just too young to find 
regular jobs. 

Jeff Isaacson, who began the 
Southwest Teen Council, and 
who works at the Southwest 
Community Center said, "So far 
only 15 kids have gotten jobs 
through the Rent-A-Kid 
program. But if more jobs come 



up we will actively recruit more 
kids." 

To clear up any undone jobs 
around your house, hire one of 
these kids. You'll be doing 
yourself and the kids a favor. 
For information call Jeff 
Isaacson at the Southwest 
Community Center, 372 Granite 
St., Quincy at 471-0796. 

These youngsters are getting 
plenty of practical experience at 
the Teen Council's new drop-in 
center at 388 Granite St. It will 
be a recreation hall with pool 
tables, ping pong table, pinball 
machine and juke box. 

The kids in the program are 
pitching in to clean up the place 
and help remodel. But they need 
skilled workers to rebuild the 
brick roof-support columns and 
to pour a concrete floor. 

The Teen Council needs 
paneling, cement, a toilet and a 
back-check valve, and a few 
adults that know how to install 
these things. If you're a 
carpenter, mason, or just 
interested in kids and would like 
to help, contact the Southwest 
Community Center at the above 
number. 

The Southwest Teen Council, 
which is open to teenagers living 
in South and West Quincy, 
meets once a week to plan 



dances and other activities for 
the youngsters. 

Isaacson got the idea for the 
Teen Council when one of the 
youngsters in the area suggested 
the Rent-A-Kid program. 

"Now," he says, "I meet with 
the kids once a week and ask 
them what they want to do. I 
might make a few suggestions, 
and ask them how they plan to 
do something." 

"Since the Council's inception 
in September the kids have put 
on six dances at Sterling Junior 
High, drawing a crowd of 225 
teenagers, and put on a cake 
sale," Isaacson said. 

He continued, "They even 
wrote press releases [to publicize 
the Rent-A-Kid program] . 

The Council is trying to open 
the drop-in center in the cellar 
of the Mac Winer Co., 388 
Granite St., whfch was donated 
free to the Council in return for 
remodeling, by the owner of the 
drapery factory upstairs. 

The drop-in center will be run 
under the auspices of the Quincy 
Recreation Department and will 
open as many nights as it can 
afford. Like the other two 
drop-in centers in Quincy, it will 
be staffed by people payed by 
the recreation department. 



School Committee Organizes Jan. 7 



The Quincy School 
Committee will hold its 
organizational meeting Monday 
[Jan. 7] at 7:30 p.m. following 
the swearing in of one new and 
two returning members. 

The chief item of business on 
the agenda will be the selection 
of a vice chairman, a post that is 
reportedly being sought by five 



of the six committee members. 
Mayor Walter J. Hannon is 
automatically the chairman. 

Those in contention are Frank 
Anselmo, Harold Davis, Frank 
McCauley, Charles Sweeny and 
the newcomers, John J. Sullivan, 
who was elected to succeed the 
retiring Paul Kelly, who was also 
vice chairman. 



The only member apparently 
not a candidate for vice 
chairman is Daniel Raymondi. 

Following the election, school 
committee members will attend 
the inaugural ball and reception 
for Mayor Hannon and the City 
Council at 8 p.m. in the 
Voc-Tech School gym. 



Cemetery Probe Continues With $5,000 



The Oversight Committee of 
the City Council was scheduled 
to meet last night [Wednesday] 
in its continuing investigation of 
irregularities in the Cemetery 
Department. 

But the future of the whole 
probe is clouded. 

The committee has hired an 



attorney, Martin Cosgrove, and a 
stenographer, Frank Moran, but 
it had to go twice to the City 
Council to get reluctant approval 
of a $5,000 appropriation to pay 
for their services. 

The vote was 6-3, exactly the 
two-thirds needed for approval. 



The committee chairman, 
Councillor Edward S. Graham, 
will be replaced on the Council 

Monday [Jan. 7] as will 
councillors Albert Barilaro, J. 
Vincent Smyth, William D. 
Delahunt and Theophilus 
McLelland Ilk 



Pay Your Excise Tax Or Lose Your License 



"You'll have to give up wine and women, Mr. 
but sing all you want to." 



Davis. 



Quincy Tax Collector Robert 
Foy has issued a stern warning 
to motorists who are delinquent 
in payment of their auto excise 
taxes -- pay up or risk losing 
your license. 

A 1973 state law permits the 
Registry of Motor Vehicles to 
revoke licenses for non-payment 
of excise taxes. 

Recent hearings before the 
Registry, Foy pointed out, have 
resulted in the revocation of 
several licenses and the 
collection of nearly $200,000 in 
fines, interest, costs and charges. 

f he hearings were held in the 

HAIL 74 

Hail! Hail! Hail! 

A Promising Infant of '74 

Is Born ... Eyes eager 

And wonder-full-bouncing 

With exuberance and 
readiness, 

On this joyous and 
memorable 

Moment, while Old Father 
Time 

Faintly Passes On. 

Everywhere - happy throngs 
Seal their last farewells 
Of Yesterday, and with 
Zealous hearts, for-ward 
Do they L-o-o-k ... 
As doors of Tomorrow open 
With "new hopes and 
promises." 

Anna T. Anderson, Quincy 



larger cities of the state and the held in such areas as the South 
next round of hearings will be Shore. 

•Youth Speaks Out 

• Henry Kissinger hopes we don't conquer outer space, or else there 
go his Sundays and vacations. 

• The only thing we don't have a shortage of is shortages. 

• It's truly amazing that President Nixon hasn't blamed the news 
media for the energy crisis. 

• White House aides now say [anonimously] that President Nixon 
lied about the coverup. The aides only figured that out eight months 
after the American people. 

• A prediction: President Nixon will not release transcripts of the 
tapes, saying that they could be misinterpreted. Although it's 
difficult to figure out what else "Break into that doctor's office" 
could mean. 

• This column is often said to be prejudiced against President Nixon. 
If that is true it is because: prices are higher on necessities than they 
have ever been; unemployment is rampant; we have an energy crisis, 
while oil people become millionaires overnight. 

We had a wage freeze while corporate profits were the highest in 
history; there is still fighting in Southeast Asia; the Arabs won't sell 
us any oil; we sold millions of bushels of wheat to Russia and bread 
in this country went up 30%. 

We have been lied to; a number of honest men have been fired for 
doing their jobs; there is a total lack of leadership, and somehow we 
can't seem to blame either John Dean or Walter Cronkite for it. 

Quincy High School Journalism Class. 



Page 6 Quincy Sun Thursday, January 3, 1974 




NEW EAGLE SCOUT Darryl Kent Mikami of Braintree displays his award at ceremonies at the Bethany 
Congregational Church, Quincy. With him are his mother, Mrs. Kinya Mikami; his father, Kinya Mikami, 
scoutmaster of Braintree Troop 24; and Clint Pendleton, former scoutmaster of Troop 24. Darryl's Eagle 
Scout project was renovation of a storage room in the church into a contemporary youth room. 

Granite City Grange Holds Supper 



The Granite City Grange met 
recently in the Senior Citizens 
Drop-In Center, 24 High School 
Ave., Quincy. A covered dish 
supper was served. 

Master Mrs. Mary Berry 
presided. Seated at the Master's 
Station were special guests 
Deputy John Zampine; Herbert 
Kendall, Blue Hills Pomona 
representative; and Mrs. Ellen 
Williamson, overseer of the 
Braintree Grange. 

Mrs. Ethel Pearson was 
hostess for the evening, assisted 
by Mrs. Sadie Wesley, Mrs. Edith 
Purpura, Mrs. Gladys Caledonio 
and Mrs. Pauline Sullivan. 



PERMANENT 



Mrs. Sadie Wesley presented a 
Christmas Program lecture. Elva 
Robbins led Christmas carol 
singing, and Mrs. Dorothy 
Kendall read a Christmas story. 
Prizes were awarded to Mrs. 
Mollie Atkinson, Mrs. Elizabeth 
Feeley, James Hanson and Mrs." 
Ethel Pearson. 

Mrs. Mabel Drinkwater was 
presented with a certificate and 
pin for 25 years' membership by 
John Zampine and her brother, 
Robert Berry. 



Granite City Grange members 
will attend a reception at the 
Needham Grange in honor of 
Janet Fields tonight [Thursday] . 
Miss Fields will be presented 
with a pink sash for being 
installed as State Flora recently 
at the Massachusetts State 
Grange sessions at Chicopee 
Falls. 

The next meeting of the 
Granite City Grange called 
"Agriculture Night" will be 
Monday, Jan. 28 at 8 p.m. 



Blue Hills Masters 
Install Executive Member 



REMOVAL 



UNWANTE 



m 



MARLENE 
MELAMED RE. 

Registered and Licensed 
Electrologist 
1151 Hancock St. ' 
Ouincy 
By Appointment only 

Call 773-1330 

FORMERLY 

FHKDl.KIC'K S. HILL 



The Blue Hills Masters and 
Lecturers • Association met 
recently in the Fore River 
Grange Hall, South Weymouth, 
with president Mrs. Lillian Wall 
presiding. 

Mrs. Edith Thorne was 
installed as a member of the 
Executive Committee for a 
three-year term. Installing 
president John Zampine and 
Marshall Robert Berry led the 
ceremony while Mrs. Elva 



Robbins played the piano. 

Deputy John Zampine 
discussed plans to confer the 
four Degrees on a class of 
candidates at the Fore River 
Grange Hall in January. 
Refreshments were served at the 
musical program and social hour 
after the meeting. 

Masters and Lecturers 
Association members will 
entertain at the Whitman Grange 
meeting Jan. 1 1 at 8 p.m. 



We are interested in PURCHASING 
& APPRAISING precious jewels. 

FREE CONSULTATION FOR PRIVATE 
OWNERS, BANKERS & ATTORNEYS 

Robert S. Freeman Certified Gemologist 
Call 773-2170 HARTS Jewelers 

1422 Hancock St, Quincy, Mass. 




*>~ •' : '-'* '- *- *« * « 



&5f: : : : :Y: ; * ^ :: /: .$&&wx£-S ft* : Vtti- 



* 



■ 



EI1EMBIB Willi 




PHOTO COURTESY OF THOMAS CRANE PUBLIC LIBRARY 



...The corner grocery sold oats 
for 25 cents for 7 pounds and 
all kinds of tea for 25 cents. 
This store also gave S&H 
Green Stamps. 



Do you remember when your 
last property valuation took 
place? Do you know who your 
insurance company is? Talk 
with us at Burgin-Platner. 

BURGIN 

PLATNER 

INS. 

1357 Hancock Street, 
Quincy 472-3000 



Jewish Community Center 
Seniors To Install Jan. 9 



Officers of the Senior Citizens 
of the South Area Jewish 
Community Center will be 
installed, Wednesday, Jan. 9 at 1 
p.m. at the Center, 10 
Merrymount Rd., Quincy. 

The officers are: 

Mrs. Ray Kaitz of 95 
Martensen St., Quincy, 
president; Mr. Charles Veikraut 
of 14 Gilson Rd, first vice 
president; Mrs. Corinne Bayfield 
of 228 Billings Rd, second vice 
president; Etta Fried, 95 
Martensen St., financial 
secretary and treasurer; Rose 
Arnold, 95 Martensen St., 
recording secretary; Bessie 
Goldman, 109 Curtis Ave., social 



secretary. 

Jeremy Niemand is Director 
of the Center, Mrs. Jane Ravid is 
Director of Senior Adult 
Activities. Mrs. Sandy Sandberg 
is the newly appointed advisor 
to the group. 

The Senior Citizens meet 
every Wednesday afternoon at 
the Center. Activities for 
January include a business and 
social meeting Jan. 16, a 
sing-a-long on Jan. 23, and a 
speaker on public protection 
Jan. 30. 

New members are cordially 
invited to attend. Transportation 
arrangements may be made by 
calling Mrs. Ida Orenstein at 
773-3000. 



Marianns Plan Jan. 9 
'Fun Fur Fashion Show' 



The St. Ann's Marianns of 



A "Fun Fur Fashion Show" 



Wollaston will hold their will be presented, with Mrs. Beth 



monthly meeting Wednesday, 
Jan. 9 at 8 p.m. in the School 
Hall. 

Mrs. Lawrence Watts is 
chairman for the evening. 



Burbank as commentator. Club 
members will model a variety of 
furs in styles ranging from full 
length coats to stoles. 
Refreshments will be served at 
the close of the program. 



Jan. 11 Reservations 
Deadline For Seniors Social 



Friday, Jan. 1 1 is the deadline 
for reservations for the annual 
Quincy Senior Citizens Spaghetti 
Supper and Dance sponsored by 
the Quincy Recreation 
Department announces Mrs. 
Marion Andrews, Director, 
Senior Citizens Activities. 

The event will be held Jan. 18 
at the Fore River Clubhouse. A 
social hour will start at 5:30 




p.m. followed by a catered 
supper at 6:30 p.m. and dancing 
from 8 p.m. until 1 1 p.m. 

Tickets may be obtained from 
Senior Citizens Club presidents 
or from the Recreation 
Department Office. 
Transportation will be provided 
from Senior Citizens housing 
units. The schedule will be 
announced. 

Raymond Cattaneo 
Enrolled 'At Berklee 

The Berklee College of Music 
has accepted Raymond 
Cattaneo, son of Mrs. Claire 
Cattaneo of 35 Barry St., West 
Quincy as a trumpet student in 
its Division of Private Study. 



Marriage 
Intentions 



NEW PRESIDENT - Miss 

Kathryn A. MacKinnon, of 
Quincy, daughter of Mr. and 
Mrs. Clarence N. MacKinnon of 
Milton, is the new president of 
the Women's Personnel Club of 
Eastern Massachusetts. A 1966 
Northeastern University graduate 
and a candidate tor an advanced 
degree at Boston College, she is 
Personnel Manager of Star 
Market. 

wmtm—mmm—mmm—mmmm 



Norman A. MacLean, 145 
Hamden Circle, Quincy, research 
technician; Judith S. Schyndel, 
12 State St., Randolph, student. 



DERRINGER 

THE FLORIST 

Plants Arrangements Flttwers 

ttt Hancock St. 7 73 09S9 



p£TE* & Pauls 

CHILDREN'S HAIRCUTS 



HAIR 
STYLISTS 




843-9717 



MON.-TUES.-WED. 

Perm - $11.50 
Frosting- $17J0 
Bleaching- $11.50 

Tint & Set - $7.50 

848-2821 



$2.50 And Up 

TEEN AGE BOYS AND GIRLS 
H AIRCUTS 

Mon. & Tues 
SENIOR CITIZENS 
SPECIAL 
Shampoo and Set • $2.50 



I Kathy, Lori, Dak & Linda | 
"WALK-IN SERVICE" 

316 Quincy Ave. 
^£**** East Braintree 



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FREEPARKMG AVAILABLE Hi REAR 

— — — — — — . i 



Thursday, January 3, 1974 Quincy Sun Page 7 




MARRIED - Mrs. John D. Mullan is the former Patricia Anne 
Hennessy, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. John J. Hennessy of Quincy. 
Her husband is the son of Mr. and Mrs. John P. Mullan. They were 
married at St. Ann's Church. The bride is an x-ray technician at the 
Harvard School of Dental Medicine. Mr. Mullan is employed by the 
Metropolitan District Commission and attends the University of 
Massachusetts at Boston. The couple will live in Brookline. 

[The Noursesl 

Pamona Grange Hears 
Reports, Makes Donations 



The Blue Hills Pomona 
Grange met recently at the 
Brookville Grange Hall with 
Master Mrs. Elva Robbins 
presiding. 

Pomona masters and state 
chairmen were seated at the 
master's station. 

All committees read their 
reports for 1973 and donations 
to charitable organizations were 
made. 

Deputy John Zampine gave a 
report on legislative bills in the 
State House and Mary Hayward 
gave a report on agriculture. 

Ways and Means Committee 
Chairman Herbert Kendall 
presented turkeys to drawing 
winners Mr. J. Hanson and Mr. 
John McCabe of the Granite 
City Grange. Virginia Skinner of 
Randolph received the lecturers 
award and Mrs. Anna Taylor 
received the Home and 



Community special prize. 

The Rev. Arthur Bowles of 
Randolph sang while 
accompanied by Mrs. Bowles on 
piano. Artist William Parnedes 
painted a Christmas scene in 
water colors which will be a 
drawing prize at the January 
meeting. Community singing 
concluded the program under 
the direction of lecturer Mrs. 
Dorothy Kendall. 

The Blue Hills Pomona 
Grange will celebrate its 26th 
anniversary Saturday at 4:30 
p.m. in the Brookville Grange 
Hall. Supper reservations are 
available from secretary Alice 
Curtis at 961-3468. The evening 
programs at 8:15 will be open to 
the public. 

A regional Grange meeting 
will be held Feb. 24 at 1 p.m. 
Meeting place will be 
announced. 



Quincy Sons Of Italy 
Social Center 

120 Quarry St., Quincy „ 

Newest function hall now available for weddings, showers, dinner, 
dances. Main [Golden Lion] Suite has cathedral ceiling. Brides 
room • ultra modem sound system. Completely air conditioned. 

FOR RESERVATION CALL 
773-2687 AFTER 2 P.M. 



BraWey 





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for WEDDINGS • HOSPITALS 

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OPEN SUNDAYS 



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At Quincy City Hospital 
December 20 

Mr. and Mrs. Charles Stanton, 

32 Grace Road, a son. 

Mr. and Mrs. Robert Olsen, 16 
Guild St., twins - a son and a 
daughter. 

Mr. and Mrs. Robert Boidi, 47 
Copeland St., a daughter. 

Mr. and Mrs. Ronald Dolan, 
73 Lenox St., a daughter. 

Mr. and Mrs. Hartmut Zielke, 

33 Waterston Ave., a daughter. 

Mr. and Mrs. Charles' Stanton, 
32 Grace Rd, a son. 

December 2 1 

Mr. and Mrs. Anthony 
Balzano, 70 Arnold St., a son. 

December 24 

Mr. and Mrs. Ronald P. 
Stasiowski, 14 Phillips St., a son. 

December 26 

Mr. and Mrs. Kenneth Grogan, 
15 Bird St., a daughter. 

Mr. and Mrs. Angek A. 
Milone, 17 Vernon St., a 
daughter. 

At South Shore Hospital 

December 2 1 

Mr. and Mrs. Marvin D. 
Welsch, 8 Lexington St., a 
daughter. 

At St. Margaret's Hospital 
December 14 

Mr. and Mrs. James Walsh, 74 
Webster St., a daughter. 

Mr. and Mrs. Ralph 
Santosuosso, 267 Beach St., a 
son. 

December 1 5 

Mr. and Mrs.. Robert Wirtz, 85 
Alrick Road, a daughter. 

December 20 

Mr. and Mrs. Stephen 
Camerano, 10 Glynn Terrace, a 
son. 

Mr. and Mrs. William Hughes, 
299 Elmwood Ave., a daughter. 

Mr. and Mrs. Charles Murphy, 
63 Billings St., a son. 

December 25 

Mr. and Mrs. Philip Tardanico, 
792 Southern Artery, a 
daughter. 




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MARRIED -- Mrs. Robert J. Edgar is the former Patricia McArdle, 
daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Joseph J. McArdle of 346 Rock Island Rd, 
Quincy. Her husband is the son of Mr. and Mrs. Robert J. Edgar Sr. 
of 162 Waterston Ave., Quincy. They were married at the Blessed 
Sacrament Church in Houghs Neck. The bride attended school in 
Canada and is an elementary school teacher in Hull. Mr. Edgar is a 
graduate of St. Francis of Xavier College in Canada and is a member 
of the Quincy police department. The couple will live in Quincy. 

[Miller Studio] 

S.S. Mothers Of Twins 
To Hear Counselor 



The South Shore Mothers of 
Twins Club will hold its regular 
meeting Jan. 14 at 8 p.m. at the 
George Bean Legion Post, 19 
Hollis St., South Weymouth. 

Speaker will be Mrs. Lorraine 
Zimmerman, counselor and 
school psychologist for the 



B'raintree elementary schools. 

All new club members Who 
have joined since January, are 
invited to attend a membership 
tea to be held 2 to 5 p.m. Jan. 
20, at the home of club 
president Mrs. Robert Koffink, 5 
Water St., Braintree. 



Women Of Moose 
To Meet Jan. 9 



The Quincy Chapter of 
Women of the Moose met 
recently at Moose Hall, 175 West 
Howard St., Braintree. Senior 
regent Mrs. Mary Bourget 
presided while three new 
members were enrolled. 

A miscellaneous sale was held 
to support Social Service 



Chapter night. Chairman Mrs. 
Marie Hayes served 
refreshments. The meeting was 
also a Christmas party and gifts 
were exchanged. 

Next meeting of Women of 
the Moose, which is Child Care 
and Training Chapter night, will 
be next Wednesday at 8 p.m. 
Mrs. Rose Murphy is chairman. 



TIMEX 



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Factory authorized Service Center 

In and Oot-of Warranty Watches Repaired 

Genuine TIMEX Energy Cells available 



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Jewelers 



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773-6340 




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SAVE 20% 

TO 50% 

Dresses - Pantsuits 
Sportswear - Sizes 8 To 20 



FASHION SHOPPE 



1538 Hancock St., Quincy 

Mon. thru Sat. 10 to 5 Thurs. 8t Fri. til 
773-4748 




\ 



Page 8 Quincy Sun Thursday, January 3, 1974 

STRICTLY PERSONAL 

Talk overweight 
mother out of 
body stocking 



By PAT and 

MARILYN DAVIS 

Copley News Service 

Dear Pat and Marilyn: 

My mother has decided to 
wear a body stocking under a 
long dress which she pur- 
chased to wear to a party. 
Now, I have nothing against 
body stockings, but this dress 
my mother intends to wear is 
crocheted and you can see 
straight through. 

Mom is 50 years old, a little 
short, and quite a bit over- 
weight. How can I convince 
her that her choice isn't that 
great? — Daughter 

Dear Daughter: 

Tell Mom that her sil- 
houette is going to leave little 
to the imagination if she 
wears only a body stocking. 
Suggest that the overall effect 
would be more pleasing if she 
wears a slip. 

Dear Pat and Marilyn: 

I have dated Stan for over a 
year, but last Saturday he told 
me that he would never call 
me again. Here's what hap- 
pened. On Wednesday he said 
we would go to the movies 

Saturday. I said, "Fine. See 
you then." 

Generally, Stan calls every 
night. This time I didn't hear 
from him on Thursday or Fri- 
day so I made another date 
and went to a dance. I got 
home about 2 a.m. and my 
phone rang. It was Stan in- 
forming me that he had had it 
and not to expect to hear from 
him again. 

How can he be so unreason- 
able? He knows I'm never too 
definite. I can't understand 
him. Can you? — Cindy 

Dear Cindy: 

YES! 



Dear Pat and Marilyn: 

Can I get VD from kissing? 
— Worried 

Dear Worried: 

I doubt it. If you are wor- 
ried, call the Department of 
Public Health and ask for an 
examination. Or, see your 
family doctor. If in doubt, do 
not delay. 

Dear Pat and Marilyn: 

Will you please explain 
something to me? Why do 
women wear wigs? I hate 
them and can spot one a mile 
away. My wife just purchased 
two — one red and one blonde. 
How can I convince her not to 
cover her own pretty brown 
hair? -N.M. 

Dear N.M.: 

Allow your wife to have fun 
with the wigs. In the mean- 
time, continue to comment on 
the beauty of her natural hair. 
And Good Luck. 



Dear Pat and Marilyn: 

Is there a technique to help 
bowlegs? — Lenore 

Dear Lenore: 

Try the following stance 
and you'll be happily sur- 
prised. Never, never place 
bowed legs side by side. This 
calls attention to the flaw and 
the legs form a paranthesis. 

Disguise this fact by placing 
one foot due front. Turn toe of 
back foot to the side. Weight is 
on back foot. Practice this 
corrective stance in front of 
the mirror and you can see the 
results. 

If you have a question, 
write: Pat and Marilyn Davis, 
Copley News Service, in care 
of this newspaper. 



Smokers increasing despite advertising ban 



The American Cancer Soci- 
ety says Americans are 
smoking more than before 
cigarette advertisements 
were banned from TV and ra- 



dio stations. 

Since the 1971 ban, con- 
sumption has risen by more 
than 1 per cent per person. — 
CNS 



Tfxhu'a Womcri 



ONCE OVER LIGHTLY 

Mother combines Harpo, Cabrini 



By ANN RUDY 
Copley News Service 

There comes a time during 
a child's late adolescence 
when a mother is required to 
be seen and not heard. Just 
ask my daughter. 

"Mother," she has said, "I 
am very fond of you, and I 
want you to feel free to keep 
doing my laundry, cooking 
and vacuuming up the price 
tags I throw on the floor — but 
keep your opinions to yourself 
because I am in the middle of 
what Erik Erikson calls an 
identity crisis." 

A lot she cares that I'm in 
the middle of the same thing . I 
mean, I used to think I was 
Harriet Nelson with a touch of 
Mother Cabrini, but lately 
I've been feeling like Harpo 
Marx. 

It isn't easy for a mother 
whose tongue has been figura- 
tively torn out to let her 
daughter know that going out 
in the rain without an um- 
brella will result in rheuma- 
tism during later life. Or that 
parking tickets, unpaid, bring 
subpoenas and possible in- 
carceration. 

But I manage. Harpo rolled 
his eyes a lot and so do I. The 
groan is also a useful means 
of communication. The groan, 
combined with a hand to the 
forehead, followed by a short 
gasp can tell a kid plenty, but 
gestures will never replace a 
mother's words. Only yester- 
day she found that out. 

"Mom," she said, "Where's 
your charge card?" 

I stood before her mute, lips 
working, searching for the 
right words. "Come on, I'm 
late," she urged. I rolled my 
eyes toward my purse and 
jerked my thumb in the direc- 
tion of the table on which it 
lay. She thought I wanted her 
to put on a warmer coat. 

I tried again and she 
thought I was warning her to 
fasten her seat belts. Finally, 
she pulled me over to the sofa, 
sat down beside me and said 
how about a hot cup of coffee 
and a little chat — just the two 
of us. 



Our Building Is Rising 
Your Interest Is Rising 




TEMPORARY QUARTERS 
WHILE OUR NEW BUILDING IS 
UNDER CONSTRUCTION 
440 HANCOCK ST., NORTH QUINCY 
FULL SERVICES AS USUAL 



HOURS: 
DAILY 9-3, FRIDAY 9-5:30 
479-6040 



BRANCH OFFICE 
100 GRANITE ST.. DOWNTOWN 
DAILY 1 1-6, FRIDAY 11-€ 
SATURDAY TO-2 
471-3900 



Gianite^ 

c^opei^tiv^ 
c B^fk 





'Mother, 



I'm 



in 



It was like the intimacy be- 
tween an interrogating officer 
and the guy who won't tell 
what he did with the body. But 
it worked. 

She got her charge card and 



an identity crisis.' 

I got my voice back. 

"Keep it under twenty dol- 
lars!" I called after her. 

Maybe Harpo Marx with 
just a touch of Mother 
Cabrini. 



Ambergris is used to make fine perfume 



Ambergris, a product of the 
sperm whale's digestive sys- 
tem, is found as unattached 
lumps of varying sizes in the 
whale's intestine. 



A superior fixative in fine 
perfumes, ambergris traps 
and holds the fragrance of 
flowers. — CNS 



OF 



WINTER SALE 

SHOES 



BOOTS 



AND 




FAMOUS BRANDS 



OFF 





MILTON 
Factory Shoe Outlet 

564 ADAMS ST., 
EAST MILTON 

Open Daily 'til 6 P.M. - Thurs. & Fri. 'til 9 P.M. 



Thursday, January 3, 1974 Quincy Sun Page 9 



Your Horoscope Guide 



For Hie Week Of 
Jan. 8 To 12 

By GDMA 
Copley News Service 

ARIES: (March 21 to April 

19 — Also Aries Ascendant) — 
Relax and enjoy the home en- 
vironment. Vague feelings of 
dissatisfaction with present 
residence will pass, so make 
no impulsive decisions now. 
Be companionable with close 
associates — guard against 
disputes. 

TAURUS: (April 20 to May 

20 — Also Taurus Ascendant) 

— Realistically evaluate your 
finances. Take care of current 
matters — resist desire to 
procrastinate or dodge issues. 
Develop responsible attitudes 
toward cooperative efforts. 
Curb tendency to lose your 
temper. 

GEMINI: (May 21 to June 
20 — Also Gemini Ascendant) 
— You can make an agreeable 
compromise relating to a cur- 
rent project. Enjoy a change 
of pace by getting out and 
about now. Figure a long- 
range budget realistically and 
vow to stay with a savings 
plan. 

CANCER: (June 21 to July 
22 — Also Cancer Ascendant) 

— Travel appears to figure in 
this week's plans. An impor- 
tant meeting could be in- 
volved. Lay the groundwork 
for increased activity to come 
in the next two months. Pay 
attention to health and ap- 



pearance. 

LEO: (July 23 to August 22 
— Also Leo Ascendant) — 
Don't come on too strong now. 
Ambition runs high but watch 
tendency to hog the spotlight. 
Give credit to associates who 
have helped. Go over the 
budget with partner and insist 
that you both adhere to it. 

VIRGO: (August 23 to Sept. 
22 —Also Virgo Ascendant) — 
Your personality really shines 
now, so activate hopes and 
wishes. Important people no- 
tice your efforts and lend sup- 
port. Ability to concentrate on 
the positive factors in your 
life increases your joy and 
ease. 

LIBRA: (Sept. 23 to Oct. 22 

— Also Libra Ascendant) — 
Finish up tasks and details in 
career area this week. Culti- 
vate important visitors for 
benefit regarding future proj- 
ects. Consult professionals in 
the areas of your questions. 
Reactivate a project tabled 
last summer. 

SCORPIO: (Oct 23 to Nov. 
21 — Also Scorpio Ascendant) 

— Through quiet times alone 
you can resolve certain things 
inside yourself. Follow intui- 
tion for new approach to an 
old problem. Be more open 
and candid than is your habit 

— lay your cards on the table. 

SAGITTARIUS: (Nov. 22 to 
Dec. 21 — Also Sagittarius As- 
cendant) — Career can take a 



SICK LEAVE 

A Civil Service study shows 
that women over 40 take less 
sick leave than younger wom- 
en. — CNS 



LADY GOVERNOR 

On Jan. 5, 1925,- Mrs. Nellie 
Tayloe Ross of Wyoming be- 
came the first woman gover- 
nor. 



giant step forward now. Be 
considerate of friends. Accent 
on romance and marriage in- 
dicate the need for an honest, 
fresh approach. Possible ful- 
fillment of a fondest dream. 

CAPRICORN: (Dec. 22 to 
Jan. 19 — Also Capricorn As- 
cendant) — Possibility of 
pressures lifting somewhat. 
You may be offered a new 
project involving travel. 
Completion of a previous 
project could bring recogni- 
tion. Guard health carefully 
against colds or f hi. 

AQUARIUS: (Jan. 20 to 
Feb. 18 — Also Aquarius As- 
cendant) — Accent is on part- 
nerships, finances and educa- 
tional or literary matters. 
Listen to your intuition. Don't 
be unduly influenced by 
pessimistic expressions from 
others. A time for self-analy- 
sis and meditation. 

PISCES: (Feb. If to March 
20 — Also Pisces Ascendant) 
—A new person may come in- 
to your life and romance could 
blossom. Tune in to your inner 
feelings. Let others take cen- 
ter stage as you learn through 
observation. Push career 
matters later on. 

You can learn astrology at 
home with a Home Study 
Course in Beginners' Astrolo- 
gy, now available. For infor- 
mation, write: Your Horo- 
scope Guide, Copley News 
Service, in care of this news- 
paper. 



CITY A DAY 

The world population is 
growing at about 100 people a 
minute, which adds the 
equivalent of a city of 144,000 
to the world every day. — CNS 




General Electrics 



20.8 CO. FT. NO-FROST 
REFRIGERATOR- FREEZER 
Only 30'/*" Wide, 66" High.. 

GIANT 6.96 CU. FT. FREEZER... 
BIGGEST AVAILABLE IN A 
TOP-FREEZER MODEL... 
HOLDS UP TO 243 POUNDS 
OF FROZEN FOOD 

FREEZER FEATURES: 

• Jel Freeze left compartment 

• Ice n Easy Service (or, add an 
Automatic Icemaker, available at 
extra cost) 

REFRIGERATOR FEATURES: 

• Adjustable Meat Pan— attaches 

to any Adjustable Cantilever Shelf 

e Generous door storage 
e Rolls out on Big Wheels 




HANCOCK 

TIRE & APPLIANCE CO. 

115 FRANKLIN ST. 
SOUTH QUINCY 472-1710 



BRAINTREE 

TV & APPLIANCE CO. 

17 HANCOCK ST. 
BRAINTREE SQ. 843 4250 
[Open Ft i . Eves mi 9! 



YOUR HANDWRITING TELLS 

Being a wife 
frightens her 



By DOROTHY 

ST. JOHN JACKSON 

Certified Master 

Graphoanalyst 

Copley News Service 

Dear Dorothy: 

My parents were unhappily 
married and finally divorced 
when I was young. I had the 
responsibility of taking care 
of my sisters and brothers and 
keeping house while my 
mother worked. I am now, at 
25, planning my own wedding, 
but I am very much afraid of 
marriage. Being a mother 
doesn't worry me. It's being a 
wife that scares me. Why? 

A.K. 

Dear A.K.: 

You've learned from what 
you've seen. You've learned 
that marriage is no flip of 
fate. 

During your tender est 
years, you were caught in the 
middle, between two unhappy 
people. It frightened you then, 
it frightens you now. The 
lower loops show the memo- 
ries you have stored in your 
mind, the return to the line of 
writing shows them still alive 
and active, and the size says 
that you can balloon those 
happenings all out of propor- 
tion. 

In order to escape these 
thoughts, you have trained 
yourself to believe only what 
you want to believe, seen in 



the large wrap around loop on 
a. You have tried to avoid the 
real facts by fooling yourself 
into thinking that it wasn't so 
bad, after all. 

As a child, you were put "in 
charge." You became quite 
independent, seen in your 
short d, and you felt a kind of 
child security. Now the chips 
have fallen. You find yourself 
ready for that great marriage 
impact. 

Now it's time to replace 
those unwanted facts with the 
real facts — and the truth is 
almost too much for you to 
bear. You can be happy, you 
deserve it. Enter your mar- 
riage with full realization that 
your man is a human being 
just like you. 

Know that he's a tower of 
strength who needs to be 
strengthened. He's a comfort- 
er who needs to be comforted, 
he's a lover who needs to be 
loved. 

A man is all these things 
wrapped up into one and he's 
worth a lifetime of it. 

D.J. 

Selected letters will be an- 
swered through this column. 
A free handwriting chart of 
some common basic person- 
ality traits may be obtained 
by writing to Dorothy St. John 
Jackson, Copley News Ser- 
vice, in care of this newspa- 
per. Enclose long, self-ad- 
dressed, stamped envelope. 



S-^Um. irtyt- ^j&£mUoO 



Eyeglass Prescriptions Filled - Lenses Duplicated 
1000 Frames on Display - Sunsensors & Tints 
Hearing Aids - Complete Service 
Try us -you'll like us all work guaranteed 

10% discount on any purchase with this ad till Jan. 31 

OPTICAL & HEARING AID, CTR. INC. 

1361A HANCOCK ST., QUINCY SQUARE 

Tel: 773-3505 773-4174 




FOR THE GIFT 
THATS DIFFERENT 



* Pottery 

* Hand Tooled 
Leather Items 

I 



* Driftwood 
Palette Painting 

* Silver Jewelry 

* Puzzle Toys 



\V^Un 



tfUC 



131 WASHINGTON ST. QUINCY 479-2062 
OPEN 10 A.M. TO 5 P.M. CLOSED MONDAYS SUNDAYS 1 TO 5 



WANTED 

GOOD DRIVERS FOR 1974 



AUTO, 



INSURANCE 



* NO DOWN * NO SERVICE • LOW RATES 

PAYMENT CHARGE 



BROOKFIELD 

INSURANCE AGENCY 
587 HANCOCK ST., QUINCY 



479-1144 



Page 10 Quincy Sun Thursday, January 3, 1974 



Quincy High-Voc. Tech NEWS 



Written by members of the Quincy High School Journalism, Class 



'Lake Faxon' 

Flooded Faxon Field A Hazard 



By PETER RAMPONI 

Everybody who has gone by 
the field or swamp next to the 
Voc-Tech must realize that this 
is a hazard as well as an 
inconvenience to students. 

The field fills up like a lake 
every time it rains and floods the 
student parking lot, making it 
very difficult for a student to 
find a parking spot. 

Besides this it is a hazard for 
any young child in any of the 
neighboring houses around the 
school. Out in the middle of this 
"lake" it is two to 3Vi feet deep 
which is plenty deep for a young 
child to drown in if they 
happened to walk out on the ice 
that forms on it in early winter. 

After all the money the city 
has spent on landscaping and 
leveling the field, you would 
think they could put proper 
drainage on the field before 
someone completely unaware of 
the danger gets killed. 








'LAKE FAXON' 




CAR WASHING 
IS OUR BUSINESS 



EXTERIOR 

CAR WASH -l 

Automatic L,, 

IrVhite WalL ' ^ 

Machine, 'J(( 

Drying By 
Machine And 
Man Power ^ 

We know we give the best custom ex terior 
1 Car Wash available 

We Guarantee The Finest Wash Available 



Read why our car wash, is so 
superior. 
We don't have ALL the 
gimmicks that you have to buy 
to get a good CAR WASH! It's 
our business to give the 
there is. Try us once! We 
guarantee the best car wash 
there is. We dry our cars with 
manpower and clean your 
whitewalls with our automatic 
wheel washer. 



Econo Car Wash 

459 Southern Artery 

(opposite the Quincy Police Station) 



Top Ten News Stories 



[AS SEEN BY QUINCY HIGH SCHOOL JOURNALISM CLASS] 

1 . Watergate 

2. Agnew Resigns 

3. Energy Crisis 

4. P.O.W. Return 

5. Mid East Fighting 

6. Archibald Cox fired; Richardson, Ruchelshaus resign. 

7. Former Presidents Johnson and Truman die. 

8. July crash claims 88 lives in Boston. 

9. Sports News - Bobby Riggs and Billie Jean King and Secretariat. 

10. Kissinger appointed Secretary of State and wins Nobel Peace 
Prize. 

CHERYL ACKER 
STEVE DOUCETTE 



14 Students 
Accepted At Schools 



By CYNTHIA DiCENSO 

The following students have 
already been accepted to the 
following schools: 

Janice Cassidy - Stonehill. 

Susan Craig - Quincy City 
Hospital. 

Paula Choquette 
Northeastern. 

Mike DiCesare - Northeastern. 



Dave DiBona - Northeastern. 
Eleanor Eicoff - Northeastern. 
Janice Ryan - Northeastern. 
Theresa Stetler 
Northeastern. 

Cynthia Shaw - Northeastern. 
Dan Smith - Brandeis. 
Joanne Terbble - Cornell. 
Paul Viles - Bentley. 
Denise Walters - Northeastern. 
Mary O'Leary - Northeastern. 



Fond Memories 
Of Cotton Bowl Parade 



By KATHY McEACHERN 

Friday, Dec. 28 marked one 
year gone by since the Quincy 
High Marching Presidents left for 
Dallas, Tex. to participate in the 
Cotton Bowl Parade. 

To the 150 people who went, 
it brought back many memories 
of the fun, the long hours of 
marching practice and the fear 
when it came time to march 
down the center of Dallas in 
front of the television cameras. 



But as usual, the Presidents 
did their very best, and it earned 
them recognition all over the 
country. 

This year the band has 
received many opportunities to 
march, which includes the Mardi 
Gras in New Orleans, the Tulip 
Festival in Holland and in 
Niagara Falls. 

So, if any of these invitations 
are accepted, expect to see a 
band member on every corner, 
they'll need your support! 



Physical Education 
Electives Available 



By SUSAN WINTERMEYER 

Quincy High School has a 
number of Physical Education 
electives available to it's students 
this year. 

Students meet in the 



r 



For Home 
Delivery 

Cmll 
471-3100 



Voc-Tech gym at th beginning 
of each semester and ign up for 
the elective they want. Seniors 
always get first choice, and then 
juniors and sophomores. 

The electives offered for 
Semester II are: 

Tennis, golf and archery - Mr. 
Finnegan. 

Fitness and aerobics 
Amorosino. 

Boy's team sports 
Conroy. 

Girl's team sports 
Webster. 

Social games - Mr. Silvia 
[recreational sports] . 

Swimming and lifesaving - 
Miss Ruark. 

Open gym - Miss Ruark. 



Mr. 



Mr. 



Miss 



rations & KicLardion 

INSURANCE AGENCY 
INC 

"Be Sure Now-Not Sorry Later" 



1245 HANCOCK ST. 

"Resident 3-1276 



Opposite Quincy 

Center MBT A 



Thursday, January 3, 1974 Quincy Sun Page 1 1 



Quincy Rehabilitation Office Offers Many Services 



By EARLMacLEOD 

Director. 

Community Development 

and 

Interagency Relations 

[Special to the Quincy Sun] 

For many people in the 
community the activities of the 
Massachusetts Rehabilitation 
Commission are unknown, as is 
the case with many human 
services. 

The public is unaware of 
what is available either free of 
charge or at a nominal fee. 

The Quincy area office of the 
Massachusetts Rehabilitation 
Commission located in the 
Kendall Building at 1073 
Hancock St. makes a variety of 
services available to people with 
various disabilities. 

It is headed by Mrs. Esther 
Delaney. 



The Commission is a state 
agency providing service to 
residents of Massachusetts who 
are 1 6 years or older that have a 
physical, mental or 
psychological handicap that is a 
substantial barrier to 
employment and who may be 
reasonably prepared for gainful 
employment. 

In simple language, the above 
phrase means; if you have a 
physical or mental problem that 
hinders your becoming 
employed or retaining your 
present job and the problem can 
be corrected or eased within 
reason, you may apply for 
services through the commission. 

The goal is to provide those 
evaluation and medical services 
that will help the person 
minimize his limitations and 
learn those skills that will get 
him back to work and earning 
money again. 



Inquiries or appointments 
may be made directly at the 
Quincy Office or by calling 
471-1600. 

Rehabilitation services, like 
the following are provided singly 
or in combination as needed: 

* Medical examinations, 
psychological or psychiatric 
evaluation and vocational tests 
to determine the nature and 
degree of the disability and to 
assess work capacity. 

* Training for the right job 
by providing schooling, college 
training, trade or commercial 
school, or on-the-job-training: 
This can be provided in a 
rehabilitation center or at home. 

* Maintenance and 
transportation during 
rehabilitation. 

* Counseling and guidance, 

* Tool, books, equipment, 
training, supplies and license for 
work. 



Youngsters In Plays At Adams Shore Library 



These are only a few of the 
services available to prospective 
clients of the Commission. 

One example of a person 
eligible for services of the 
commission is a 35-year-old man 
who suffered a serious baqk 
injury and can no longer work as 
a mechanic because he cannot 
•ndure standing, lifting or 
bending. Through rehabilitation 
services he received diagnostic 
evaluation to determine his 
physical limitations, and medical 
treatment needed to restore him 
to his best physical potential. 

In the vocational guidance, 
and counseling process, the 
client gets all the education and 
training necessary to prepare 
himself for a new profession or 
job, as well as, supplies and 
tools, help with licensing etc. 

Once prepared for his new 
work, the counselor contacts 
employer and places him in a job 
that' is both satisfactory to 
employer and client. In like 



manner people who have mental 
illness or psychological problems 
receive specialized psychiatric 
case, educational and 
occupational training. In some 
cases clients work in a sheltered 
workshop setting to make 
placement easier in similar, but 
competitive wage work in 
private industry. 

Mentally retarded clients are 
receiving services in workshops 
including Work Incorporated 
located in Quincy. 

The definition of a physical 
or mental disability is quite 
broad and includes diseases such 
as diabetes, certain heart 
conditions, as well as, other 
physical impairments. 




Fight 
Lung 

Disease 



Fight emphysema, 
tuberculosis, air pollution 

Space contributed by the publisher as a public service 



"The Safety Clinic" was the 
humorous play performed 
recently by the children at the 
Adams Shore Library. "Dr. 
Swallow", "Dr. Steppe", "Dr. 
Wise", and "Dr. Speck" took 
care of the patients with the 
assistance of a nurse. The 
mothers of the patients were 
told how to cure their children. 
Nineteen children played the 
parts. 

During intermission 16 
pre-schoolers rang bells and sang 
along with the older carolers. 

In the second play, a 
Christmas story was performed 
titled "Little Chips Christmas 
Tree". The scene was a small 
Irish cottages' living room. Little 
Chips cupboard was bare and no 
decorations on the tree until his 
little friends who were elves 
provided food and trimmed the 
tree. Chips grandfather played 
by Robert Fanning, senior 
assistant at the library was his 
constant companion. 

Children taking part in the 
plays and program included: 
Cheryl and Deborah Bambery, 
Tina Curley, Elaine Clark, 
Kathleen DiGregorio, Robert 
Fanning, Marty Griffin, Roberta 
Hennessey, Robert LaVigne, 
Daniel and Thomas Kelley, 
Deborah, Kathy and Lisa 
Mullaney, Paul and Terri Roche, 
Dawn Marie Riley, William 
Robinson and Sandra Walters. 

The program was under the 
direction of Mrs. Blanche 
Eckert, Childrens librarian and 
Robert Fanning. 

Santa Claus arrived much to 
the delight of the little ones who 
told him of their wishes. 



WOODWARD'S 

EXPERT 

DISC BRAKE 

WORK 

for 

ALL CARS 

111 Mayor McGrath Highway 

Quincy, Mess. 

Til. 773-1200 



Here are the facts about 

the fuel adjustment charge 

on your electric bill. 



1. The fuel clause which you 
have seen more than doubled on 
your bill is correct and is being 
billed in accordance with the 
applicable state laws and 
regulations. 

2. We are still not making one 
dime on this charge. All our 
increased revenues on fuel 
adjustments go directly to pay 
for our increased cost of fuel. 

3. The fuel charge for each 
month is based upon our fuel 



costs in the preceding month. 
If our fuel clause doubles in a 
month it means that our fuel 
costs above a base amount which 
has always been in your rate 
has doubled also. 

4. The cost of all types of fuel 
have, and in our opinion, will 
continue to rise. The higher 
sulfur fuel oil and coal which we 
expect to be burning in 1974 will 
cost more than the low sulfur 
fuel oil we burned in 1973. 




MASSACHUSETTS ELECTRIC COMPAHY 



245 SOUTH MAIN ST HOPEDAXE 
NEXT SCHEDULED READING - FEB 19 



0X747 



FROM 



1006 



TO 



1206 



MIL 



A22 



REAPING 



CONSTANT 



USE 



9024 953 

.FUE3, ADJUSTMENT 



PLEASE NOTIFY US 10 DAYS BEFORE MOVING 

DEMAND FUEL ADJUSTMENT 



ACCOUNT NUM&ER 

05 18101 041604 



.0072168 



AMOUNT 






TOT 



&U3 



DESCRIPTION 



ELECTRIC 



DEC 



use m stips if not shown on back win u t uftNisneo on request 







Page 12 Quincy Sun Thursday, January 3, 1974 



MONEY TALKS' 



It's Time For A Good 

Word For Passbook 

Savings 



By Philip J. 
PraiiMnt 
COLONIAL FEDERAL SAVINGS 
And Low A«ociatk>n 
of Quincy aid HoJbrook 
• « WMkdtyt •>7iM Tlwradcy* 




With all the hoopla generated 
for savings certificates and 
certificates of deposit by the 
new Federal schedule of 
maximum interest rates, it seems 
in order to say a few words in 
favor of the good old passbook 
savings account. 

This is the basic and popular 
form of savings account, and 
there are some very good reasons 
for its popularity. 

First of all, it is flexible. 
Everyone knows that you can 
deposit whatever you like 
whenever you wish to. Our 
analysis of savings-account 
activity reveals that this feature 
is widely recognized. 

Second, the passbook-account 
fund is available whenever you 
need it. Here, too, our computer 
analysis of account action 
indicates that the availability of 
saved funds when the need arises 
is valued and used. 

Third, the money in a 
passbook account earns from the 
moment it is deposited to the 
moment it is withdrawn. The 
fact that it no longer needs to be 
kept in an account to the 
quarterly interest period, as was 
the case in the past, increases its 
flexibility and availability and 
accounts for the willingness of 
customers to place it into their 
accounts even though they may 
need it in a month or two. 
Better there than in a jar in the 
kitchen cabinet! 

Fourth, the passbook account 
actually earns more than the 
present 5 l A per cent annual 
interest rate (the highest 
allowable by Federal 
regulations] since interest is 
compounded. 



Since the traditional ten days' 
grace-money deposited by the 
10th "of" any month earns from 
the lst-continues to be in effect 
on passbook savings, money 
placed on deposit by the 10th 
actually can earn more than the 
5V4 per cent rate during the first 
month. 

All these factors tend to make 
the passbook savings account the 
ideal form of saving for many 
families. Our experience with 
certificates of deposit indicates 
that some customers tend to tie 
up too much of their cash in 
these certificates and are 
annoyed when they find that 
penalties are invoked for 
withdrawing certificate funds 
before maturity. 

The new Federal regulations 
impose more severe penalties on 
prematurely cancelled 
certificates than was the case in 
the past. The effect of these 
regulations is to give the 
customer a lower return from 
the cancelled certificate than he 
would have received if he had 
placed the money in a passbook 
savings account. 

The Federal regulations 
require that the interest on 
withdrawn certificate accounts is 
to be calculated at bV* per cent 
from the date of issuance or 
renewal of the certificate and 
adds the penalty of a loss of up 
to 90 days' interest at 5'/< per 
cent rate. 

So we suggest it is wise for l 
savers to make sure they have an 
adequate sum in their passbook 
accounts to take care of 
emergency needs before 
considering certificates with 
their time-deposit limitations. 



ALLAN'S 

NEW YEAR SALE 



SPECIALS ON TAPE DECKS 
STEREO'S - RADIOS - TAPES 



:&\ 






>Nl* 



Op 



*V/A 



*T> 



SK 



4Ny?»A$ E 



ALLAN'S TAPE & STEREO CENTER 

16 Beale St. 

Wollaston 

Next to Wollaston Theatre 

OPEN: 10 to 6 Mon. lues. Sat 

10 to 9 Wed. Thins, Fri. 



*C/f 



\J AND ^zx^Z**9 




Big Pens 
Flair Pens 
Pencils 
Crayons 
Erasers 



Rulers 
Paints 

Elmers Glue 
Birthday Candles 
Playing Cards 



Note Book Paper 
Carbon Paper 
Index Cards 
Steno. Notebooks 
Scotch Tape 
Stencils 



WOLLASTON MUSIC 
CENTER and HOBBY SHOP 

27 BEALE ST.. WOLLASTON 773-5325 




FLAMENCO DANCER Dini Roman of the Boston Flamenco Ballet performs her specialty on the stage 
at Quincy Central Junior High School as part of a foreign language program at the school. 

[Quincy Sun Photo by Laban Whittaker] 

Capt. Donald Morrissey Receives Senior Wings 



Capt. Donald E. Morrissey, 
son of Mr. and Mrs. Thomas W. 
Morrissey Sr. of 51 East Elm 
Ave., Wollaston, has been 
awarded U.S. Air Force senior 
pilot wings at Boiling AFB, 
Washington, D.C. 

Capt. Morrissey, an operations 



staff officer, is assigned to 
Headquarters Command. 

Senior pilot wings are 
awarded to Air Force officers 
who have been flying at least 
seven years, are authorized to fly 
during instrument weather 
conditions and have had at least 
2,000 hours flying time. 



The captian, a 1961 graduate 
of Archbishop Williams High 
School, Braintree, received a 
B.S. degree in 1965 from Holy 
Cross College, Worcester, where 
he was commissioned through 
the Air Force Reserve Officers 
Training Corps, program. 



Mrs. Louise Swindells Exhibit At N.Q. Library 



Mrs. Louise Swindells of 
Wollaston is exhibiting her 
watercolors which were inspired 
by her recent trip to Alaska, at 
the North Quincy Branch of the 
Thomas Crane Public Library 



through January. 

Mrs. Swindells studied design 
at Cornell University in New 
York, and also studied with Mrs. 
Mary Ann Patrick at the South 



Shore Art Center in Cohasset. 

,She has exhibited in the South 
Shore Art Festival also in 
Cohasset, and at the Unitarian, 
Universalist Church in Brockton. 



4 Residents Wentworth Section Officers 



SOUTH SHORE 

SEWING MACHINE CO. 

We Service All Makes Sewing 

Machines and Vacuum Cleaners 

665A Hancock St., Wollaston 

471-5982 



MUSIC LESSONS 

Professional Instruction 

DRUM PIANO GUITAR 

BRASS REEDS 

WOLLASTON MUSIC CENTER 

27 Beale St., Wollaston 

Call 773-5325 



Four Quincy residents have 
been elected class section 
officers at Wentworth Institute, 
Boston, announces Dr. Edward 
T. Kirkpatrick, president. 

The four are: 

Eric W. Bogle, 30 Edinboro 



Rd, athletic manager. 

Alan Kirshner, 85 Thorton 
St., reporter. 

Earl Landry, 154 Palmer St., 
vice president. 

Redmond Raux, 47 Clement 
Terr., president. 



Philosophy Symposium At QJC 



The English Philosophy 



For Home 
Delivery 

CM 

471-3100 




* FLAGS » 

INDOOR OUTDOOR 
ACCESSORIES 



FLAGS^iADE TO ORDER 



STATE FLAGS CHURCH FLAGS 
FLAGS OF ALL NATIONS 

EAGLE FLAG 
CO.,INC. 

147 Beach St., 472-8242 
Wollaston, Mass. 02170 



Department of Quincy Junior 
College will present an academic 
symposium in philosophy 
entitled, "Ethical Perspectives: 
Past, Present, Future", tonight 
(Thursday) at 7:30 p.m. It will 
be held in the Learning Media 
Center of Quincy High School. 
The public is invited. 



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Thursday, January 3, 1974 Quincy Sun Page 13 



QUINCYjunior college 

SPRING SCHEDULE 1974 Division Of Continuing Education 




EVENING DIVISION 







Semester 


MONDAY 6:30-9:30 PM 


Hours 


39-EC 202 


Principles of Economics II 


3 


30-EN 102 


English Composition II 


3 


31-FR 102 


Elementary French II 


3 


46- LA 202 


Business Law II 


3 


45-MN 204 


Human Relations in Business 


3 


19-PS 101 


General Psychology 


3 


16-PY 102 


Principles of Physical Science II 


3 


49-SS 245 


Business Communications 


3 


TUESDAY 6:30-9:10 PM 




41-AC 102 


Fundamentals of Accounting II 


3 


41 -AC 202 


Intermediate Accounting II 


3 


42-DP 102 


Introduction to Data Processing II 


3 


39-EC 102 


American Economic History 


3 


51-ED 106 


Creative Activities II 


3 


51-ED 165 


Remediation of Learning Disabilities 


3 


30-EN 101 


English Composition 1 


3 


30-EN 212 


American Literature II 


3 


45-ES101 


Introduction to Esperanto 


3 


27-FA 201 


Survey of Fine Arts 


3 


22-GT 207 


United States Judicial Systems 


3 


94- LA 105 


Social Health Issues-Law Enforcement 


3 


10-MA 112 


College Mathematics II 


3 


86-PH 201 


Introduction to Public Health 


3 


21 -SO 202 


Contemporary Social Problems 


3 


32-SP 202 


Intermediate Spanish II 


3 


TUESDAY AND THURSDAY 6-8 PM 




49-SS 1 1 1 


Shorthand 1 


3 


49-SS 112 


Shorthand II 


3 


49-SS 103 


Typewriting 1 


3 


49-SS 104 


Typewriting II (8-9:45 PM) 


3 


WEDNESDAY 6:30-9: 10 PM 




18 Bl 102 


General Biology II (Lab Mon. 6:30-8:30 PM) 


4 


54-EO 151 


Learning Disabilities of the Adolescent 


3 


30-EN 102 


English Composition II 


3 


30-EN in 


Effective Speaking 


3 


30-EN 235 


A Feminist look at Women's Literature 


3 


27-FA 119 


Introduction to Photography 


3 


22-GT 212 


International Relations 


3 


23-HI 102 


United States History II 


3 


34-IT 102 


Elementary Italian II 


3 


19-PS 101 


General Psychology 


3 


19-PS 201 


Child Psychology 


3 


19-PS 203 


Adolescent Psychology 


3 


32-SP 101 


Elementary Spanish II 


3 


49-SS 235 


Secretarial Procedures 


3 


THURSDAY 6:30-9: 1 PM 




41-AC 101 


Fundamentals of Accounting 1 


3 


41-AC 102 


Fundamentals of Accounting II 


3 


18 Bl 104 


Anatomy & Physiology II (Lab. Mon. 6:30-8:30 PM) 


42-DP 106 


Computer Programming II 


6 


51-ED 101 


Introduction to Early Childhood Education 


3 


30-EN 202 


English Composition II 


3 


30-EN 102 


English Literature II 


3 


27-FA 115 


Basic Painting 


3 


27-FA 203 


Music Appreciation 


3 


51-ED 310 


Observation and Participation 


3 


22-GT 205 


Comparative Government 


3 


23-HI 111 


History of Western Civilization II 


3 


38- JO 101 


Introduction to Journalism 


3 


24-LA 109 


Police Work with Juvenile Delinquents 


3 

0k 


43 -MK 202 


Principles of Marketing 


3 


19-PS 109 


Psychology of Human Motivation 


3 


47-RE 101 


Principles of Real Estate 


3 


21 -SO 101 


General Sociology 


3 

A 


32-SP 105 


Conversational Spanish 


3 



TUITION 



Registration Ice $3.00 

Tuition per semester credit [Quincy Resident) $19.00 

Tuition per semester credit jnon-resident] $22.00 



COMMUNITY EDUCATIONAL 
SERVICES 



Community Services [ non-credit | courses are open to any person who feels that 
he may profit from them. This credit-free approach to learning makes it possible 
to continue to learn in an informal and non-competitive environment where 
learning is the only interest. 



AT QUINCY JUNIOR COLLEGE 

MONDAY 7-9 PM 

19-010 Dynamics of Human Behavior 

45-010 Effective Supervision 

45-015 Personnel Management 

30-020 Creative Writing 

19-010 Astrology I (6:45-7:45 PM) 

19-011 Astrology II (8-9 PM) 

19-050 Counseling the Troubled Child [l-3pjn.[ 

10-017 Pre-CalculusMath*(6. 1 5-9:30) (1 HS Unit) 

TUESDAY 7-9 PM 

10-050 Small Boat Navigation 

30-010 English for Everyday Speech and Writing 

50-010 Body and Mind Awareness for Women 

50-020 Basic Bridge 

10-016 Plane Geometry (T & Th) (1 HS Unit) 

27-019 Ceramic Workshop 

26-010 Religions of the World 

WEDNESDAY 7-9 PM 

55-010 Career Guidance for the Mature Woman 
Basic Mathematic Review 
A Feminist Look at Women's Fiction 
Basic Photbgraphy 
Basic Chess 
Opportunities in the Travel Industry 



Number 
of Wetks 



Tuition 



10-010 
30-015 
27-020 
50-030 
43-010 
19-030 



Personal Adjustment & Family Life [1 - 3 p.m.] 10 



THURSDAY 7-9 PM 

27-01 5 Basic Drawing or Painting 
31-010 Conversational French 
44-010 Fundamentals of Investments 

in Stocks and Bonds 
46-010 Law for the Layman 
50-020 Meditation for Yoga 
27-012 Women In Art 

AT NORTH QUINCY HIGH SCHOOL 
MONDAY 7-9 PM 

10-015 Algebra I (M&tf/) (1 HS Unit) 

41-01 1 Basic Accounting II 

34-015 Conversational Italian I 

30-025 Speed Reading (A) 

49-020 Shorthand-Beginners I 

49-025 Shorthand-Refresher 

49-01 1 Typing-Beginners II 

WEDNESDAY 7-9 PM 

30-026 Speed Reading (B) 
47-010 Real Estate-Preparation for 

the Brokers Exam 
47-015 Successful Real Estate Practices 
49-010 Typing-Beginners I 
49-015 Typing-Refresher 
41-010 Basic Accounting I 



TUITION SCHEDULE 

A-$16— Non-Residents . $20 

B-$18— Non-Residents $22 

C-S20- Non-Residents $24 

D-$25— Non-Residents $30 

E-$28—Non- Residents $32 

F-$30— Non-Residents $35 

G-$35— Non-Residents $40 

Registration Fee $3 



12 



10 


F 


10 


F 


12 


C 


12 


C 


12 


C 



REGISTRATION: MONDAY, JAN. 14-TUESDAY, JAN. 15-WEDNESDAY, JAN. 16 

TIME: 9 A.M.-4 P.M. - 6 P.M.-8 P.M. 
Write or Call: Quincy Junior College, 34 Coddington St., Quincy 47 1 -2470 

A Division of the Quincy Public Schools 



(Mi ^ Page 1 4 Quincy Sun Thursday , January 3 , 1 974 

Peter Radigan To Head 
Norfolk County Trust N.Q. Office 



i 



Peter W. Radigan has been 
promoted to Manager and will 
become the Officer-in-Charge of 
Norfolk County Trust 

Company's North Quincy office, 
announces John S. Marsh, 
chairman of the bank's board of 
Directors. 

Radigan received his Bachelor 
of Science Degree in Business 
Administration from the 
University of Bridgeport in 
1973. 

Since joining the bank's staff 
in 1970, he has worked in 
various departments at several of 
it's branches. His most recent 
assignment has been at the 
bank's Norwood office. 

Radigan and his wife Nancy 
reside in Kingston. 




PETER W. RADIGAN 



John Panarelli Receives 
Air Force Scholarship 



Cadet John P Panarelli, son 
of Mr. and v is. Nicholas A. 
Panarelli, 6 .'. Quincy Shore 
Drive, h"s> received a two-year 
U.S. Air force Reserve Officers 
Training Corps [AFROTC] 
college scholarship. 

Cadet Panarelli will receive 
full tuition, laboratory fees, a 
textbook allowance and a 
monthly subsistence allowance. 

He submitted his application 
for the scholarship after 
enrollment in the AFROTC 
training program at Norwich 
University, Northfield, Utah, 
where he is a member of the 
class of 1975. Scholarships are 
awarded on a competitive basis 
to AFROTC students. 

Upon graduation and 
completion of the AFROTC 




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second lieutenant. He is a 1971 
graduate of North Quincy High 
School. 




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ii '"In 



NORTH QUINCY 




CLEMENT A. O'BRIEN [center] receives congratulations for winning the North Quincy Knights of 
Columbus award as the Knight of the Year. Grand Knight Morris Dunn [right] presented the award 
while State Deputy Michael E. Faherty looked on. 

Robert Donovan Air Force Graduate 



Airman Robert H. Donovan, 
son of Mr. and Mrs. Kenneth R. 
Donovan of 134 Barham Ave., 
North Quincy, has graduated at 
Keesler AFB, Miss., from the Air 



Training Command's basic 
course for electronic specialists. 
The airman, who received 
instruction in communications 
and electronics systems 



William Sheehan Attends N.Y. Conference 



William Sheehan, 28 Hovey 
St., North Quincy, is one of 60 
sales representatives who 
received an in-depth view of 
Slater Electric, Inc. at a recent 
three-day sales conference held 
at Glen Cove, N. Y. 

Sheehan is a salesman for 



Electrical Agencies, Inc., South 
Boston, which sells Slater heavy 
duty and residential grade 
wiring devices to electrical 
distributors. 



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principles, is remaining at 
Keesler for advanced training. 

Donovan is a 1972 graduate 
of North Quincy High School. 

Frank J. McCarthy 
Reappointed Notary 

Frank J. McCarthy of 115 
Hamilton Ave., North Quincy 
has . been reappointed as a 
Notary Public, State Secretary 
John F. X. Davoren announces. 

Confirmation of the 
reappointed Notary was made at 
a meeting of the Executive 
Council following submission of 
the name by Governor Francis 
W. Sargent. The term will expire 
in seven years. 



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THORNTON 



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Thursday, January 3, 1974 Quincy Sun Page 15 



210 On Honor Roll At Sterling Junior High School 



Sterling Junior High 
School lists 210 students on 
the first quarter honor roll. 
They are: 

HIGH HONORS 
Grade 7 

Chris M. Erickson 
Mary E. Staples 
Gina Volandre 



HONORS 
Grade 7 

Carol A. Anderson 

Robert A. Arey 

Marilyn R. Benson 

Diane Casna 

Mary E. Cedrone 

William Chiavaroli 

Robert E. Ciardi 

Maryann Cucinatta 

Susan A. Currie 

Timothy B. Daley 

Dina M. DeLuca 

Donna M. DelVecchio 

Darlene A. Driscoll 

Lisa F. Ferrazzi 

Linda M. Gale 

Lois M. Guglielmi 

Joann Hogan 

Sandra J. Jack 

Susan M. Jones 

David N. Juitt 

Lisa N. Kadlick 

Carolyn E. Keefc 

Daniel J. Killilea 

Margaret M. Kirk 

Lori J. Laracy 

Linn C. MacDonald 

Katherine Madden 

Christina M. Mastrantonio 

Theresa A. McRudin 

Donna Morrissey 
Karen M. Murphy 

Stephen L. Nasson 

Linda M. Oliveri 
Noreen T. O'Malley 
Jeanne C. Park 
Sjsan E. Peruzzi 
Janet L. Richard 

Doreen M. Rosebrook 
Cynthia Salvatore 
Thomas D. Schow 
Marilyn A. Shannon 
Paul S. Sico 
Diane Somontes 
John M. Sophis 
Robin M. Stark 
Walter E. Steen 
Bert A. Tervakoski 
Kathleen L. Thomas 
Diane Tinney 
Carol F. Tosches 
Joann Walsh 
Wade H. Warner 
Sharon A. Zerega 

HIGH HONORS 
Grade 8 

Paula A. Cahill 
Laurie J. Chatterton 
Susan E. Chiocchio 
Julia Eleuteri 
Richard F. Gilbody 
Susan A. Tautvaisas 
Sandra J. Thompson 
Linda J. Van Bibber 
Daniel E. Walsh 

HONORS 

Grade 8 

Pauline M. Albrecht 

Donna M. Aluisy 

Doreen E. Anderson 

Lauri E. Buccini 

Larry S. Burak 

Elizabeth M. Campbell 

Paula M. Constas 

Richard C. Coose 

Andrea J. Creedon 

Adrienne M. Curran 

Doreen M. Currie 

Mary V. Daley 

Dorna L. DeLuca 

Lisa M. Desantis 

Janice A. DiCenso 

David Digiusto 

Heidi- A. Dolan 

Michael G. Duggan 
Edith P. Ekbom 
Susan A. Gaides 
Cheryl A. Gustin 
Paul J. Hanlon 
John R. Ingram 
Robin L. Juitt 
Mary A. Kadlick 
Karen Kimball 
Eddie P. Laracy 
Edward F. Lawlor 
Edmund J. Linehan 
Brian Donald MacDonald 
Sandra R. MacLeod 
Robert B. Marshall 
James C. Maver 
Nancy £. McDonough 
Joyce L. McMulten * 
Kevin Mulligin'* -v* ^> 
Edward" L. Murphy 



Donna M. Petitti 
Deborah L. Ricciardi 
Christina M. Romano 
Richard P. Ryan 
Karen M. Savalio 
Russell A. Steinbach 
John F. Sylva 
Carl E. Theodore 
Ronald Tiberi 
Sandra Tinney 
Michael A. Vreeland 
Linda J. White 



HIGH HONORS 
Grade 9 

Gisele M. appoloni 
Timothy P. Cahill 
Linda J. Cirillo 
Annette Ferner 
Philomena M. Hastings 
Judith A. Heath... 
Denise M. LaPierre 
Stephen M. McMahon 

HONORS 
Grade 9 

Jean C. Archer 



I 

e 
i 

i 
i 
i 
e 
i 
i 
■ 



Brenda C. Arey 
Dorothy S. Aronoff 
Marlene N. Benson 
Gayle M. Bertoni 
Darlene R. Bocash 
Debra I. Canale 
Maura B. Carroll 
Peter F. Carroll 
Jan E. Casanova 
Susan M. Casserly 
Brand M. Cedrone 
Gail A. Cedrone 
Ralph P. Ciampa 
Valeric E. Collins 
Bridget C. Connolly 
James A. Constas 
Joan A. Conti 
Karen A. Currie 
Janet M. Davenport 
Cheryl A. DeCelle 
Linda M. DelGreco 
Michael DelVecchio 
Pamela D. DeMarco 
William R. Dempsey 
Leah M. DePolo 
Betteanne DiBona 
Rita Fabrizio 
Joyce M. Fantucchio 
Eugene J. Fernandez 
Patricia A. Fontaine 



Paul S. Gaudiano 
Leann Gilbody 
Robin A. Gillis 
Ida M. Grossi 
Lorene E. Guglielmi 
Catherine M. Hanson 
Elizabeth A. Hennessey 
Ernest Jaffarian 
Brian E. Kelly 
Michael J. Kennedy 
Joanne S. Lamparelli 
Mara B. Lilly 
Salvatore F. Lombardo 
Karen A. Lungari 
Kimberly A. MacDonald 
Cheryl'L. Machado 
Kenneth M. MacPhee 
Anne Madden 
Janice A. Malvesti 
William M. Malvesti 
Janice Marcel 
Michelle M. Martin 
Maureen S. McCord 
Ronald McGillvray 
Karen A. Mezzetti 
Maria G. Michelangelo 
Jean W. Milne 
Michele A. Monti 
Lauren J. Mosesso 
Michael B. Murphy 



Neil F. O'Donneli 
Kathleen J. OToole 
Agatha Pasqualone 
Thomas F. Pecoraro 
Adrienne Peruzzi 
Jeanette M. Pratt 
Mary P. Pusateri 
Carta Ranalli 
Victor E. Realini 



Donna A. Reed 
Mark R. Ricciardi 
Peter Ricciardi 
Margaret A. Romig 
Michael A. Rota 
Kimberlee J. Schatzl 
Gary T. Schuman 
Brandon E. Seaman 
Patricia A. Sheehan 



Mary A. Sico 
Sharon L. Smyth 
Kathleen L. Starck 
Dorothy J. Stuart 
Cynthia D. Sullivan 
Daniel J. Thibeault 
Glenn W. Vraibel 
Philip A. Weinberger 
Suzanne L. Young 



Kenneth Tutunjian Wins 
Elks Leadership Contest 



Carl Kenneth Tutunjian of 
155 Samoset Ave., was the 
winner of the Quincy Elks' 
1973-1974 Youth Leadership 
Contest for high school juniors 
and seniors. 

Announcement was made by 
Scholarship Chairman William F. 
Ryan. 

Tutunjian, a senior at Quincy 
High School is an associate 
member of the Quincy School 
Committee, a member of the 
Student Council, the Public 
School Student Union, and the 
Massachusetts Association for 



School Councils. He is also a 
member of the Quincy High 
School Orchestra, band, glee 
club, year book staff, and the 
American Field Service, Old 
Colony De Molay, New England 
Cultural Organization and the 
Merrymount Association. 

His volunteer service includes 
elementary school tutoring and 
as a legislative aid to the General 
Court. 

Tutunjian's 
brochure has been forwarded to 
the Circle District for further 
Competition. 




everybody who gets a government 
check through the mail 

Government Employees, 

Federal Retirees, Service Personnel, 

Disabled Veterans, 

Social Security Recipients 

If you look to the mail for your government check, we can offer you a thief-proof, 
time-saving way to do your banking. It's a banking plan that lets your check be sent 
directly from the government to your bank. Your check is automatically deposited 
in your account on the same day you'd normally receive your check. We guarantee 
that your check will be credited to your account on that date, even though we may 
receive your check at a later date. No more checks stolen from your mailbox. No 
more time-consuming trips to the bank. It's a nice, easy, and safe way to 
do your banking. 

If you're interested in our Government Check Banking Plan, please fill out the 
coupon and return it to. us. We'll send you a Treasury Department form which, 
when completed and submitted by you to the agency that issues your check, will 
enable you to participate in our Government Check Banking Plan. Or, come in 
and ask us for a Treasury Department form (No. 1 189). We'll show you how simple 
it is to protect your government allotments. 



*■- 



Please send Treasury Department form (No. 1189) so I can participate in your 
Government Check Banking Plan. 

Name '. . . . „ . . . 

Address 

City . 



State 



Zip 



□ I now have a checking account at the Hancock Bank. (No _) 

□ I now have a savings account at the Hancock Bank. (No. _) 

□ I am interested in opening a checking and/or savings account at the 
Hancock Bank. 

Mail back to: Government Check Banking Plan, Hancock Bank and Trust Company. 
1495 Hancock Street, Quincy, MA 02169 



The Money Tree Bank 



* t" 






* * 

Main office in Quincy Center, with 14 Branches south and west of Bdstpn. 
Quincy 773-9500 Norwood 769-1 3Q0 | **•* ; Q^j$$ M 



% 



! : 



Page 16 Quincy Sun Thursday, January 3, 1974 




SENATOR ARTHUR TOBIN does the ribbon-cutting honors at grand opening of newly expanded 
Bernie's Modern Formal Shop, 1586 Hancock St. in downtown 'Quincy. Assisting are, from left, Donna 
Reisberg, 16, Bernie Reisberg, owner; Mrs. Muriel Hartley, 25-year employee; Mrs. Peisberg and son 
Steven, 19. 

[Quincy Sun Photo by Laban H. Whittaker] 

Robert Blair Elected To Babson Corporation 



Robert L. Blair of 6 Hatherly 
Rd, Quincy, was one of nine 
Boston area residents elected to 
the Corporation of Babson 
College at the corporation's 
annual meeting. 



Blair is Chairman of the Board 
and President of South Shore 
National Bank, Quincy. He is 
also serving as first vice president 
of Massachusetts Bankers 
Association, and is a member of 



the Board of Directors of 
Deaconess Hospital. 

He was elected to a three year 
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Business News 



John Vivian Elected 
Quincy Co-operative President 



The election of John A. 
Vivian as President of The 
Quincy Co-operative Bank, 
effective yesterday, is 
announced by Heslip E. 
Sutherland, Chairman of the 
Bank's Board of Directors. 

Vivian is the bank's 10th 
President, succeeding Charles G. 
Peterson who resigned Nov. 30 
to become an officer of the 
South Shore National Bank. 
During the interim, Chairman 
Sutherland served as both 
President and Chairman. 

The new president, a graduate 
of Brown University, was 
formerly Vice President and 
Treasurer of Springfield 
Institution for Savings. He lives 
in Wilbraham, Mass., with his 
wife and four children and will 
be moving to the South Shore 
area as soon as housing plans are 
completed. 

The Springfield Institution is 
a $480 million savings bank with 
12 branches. Vivian has had 
experience in all phases of 
management including the 
planning and opening of branch 
offices. During his term, he was 




JOHr*A. VIVIAN 

given a year's leave of absence in 
order to direct the 
redevelopment of the City's 
central business district. 

Both Mr. and Mrs. Vivian have 
been involved in community and 
civic affairs in Springfield and in 
Wilbraham. He has also served as 
Senior Warden of the Church of 
the Epiphany. 



James D. Asher, Jr. 
Elected Chamber Director 



James D. Asher, Jr., 
President-Treasurer of the South 
Shore Broadcasting Company, 
radio station WJDA, has been 
elected to a three year term on 
the Board of Directors of the 
South Shore Chamber of 
Commerce effective Jan. 1, 
1974. 

The South Shore Chamber of 
Commerce is a business 
organization comprised of more 
than 775 South Shore 
businesses. 

Asher is a graduate of Harvard 
University and is a Director of 
the Massachusetts Broadcasters' 
Association, and the American 
Red Cross (Weymouth Chapter) 
and a member of the One 
Hundred Club of Massachusetts, 




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He lives with his wife, the 
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Thursday, January 3, 1974 Quincy Sun Page 17 



NORTH QUINCY HIGH'S intramural football champions had to beat out 17 other qualifiers for the 
title after competing with three other teams in their class. Front, left to right, Geoff Hennessey, Dave 
Lorman, Tony Catino and Marty O'Sullivan. Back, Instructor Lou loanilli, Pete Will. Jed Phelan Roy 
Widman and Joe Vella. 



Basketball 



Quincy Title Contender; 
North Edges Strong Somerville 



Joe Amorosino's debut as 
Quincy High's head basketball 
coach is proving extremely 
successful and the Presidents 
have stamped themselves as 
strong contenders for the 
Greater Boston League 
championship. 

Quincy, nipped by a point in 
its opening game, has won four 
in a row and last night 
(Wednesday) was favored to 
make it five at Chelsea. Friday 
night the Presidents host rival 
North Quincy and Tuesday play 
at Somerville. 

Bob Nolan's North quintet 
also is starting to jell with two 
wins in a row after losing its first 
two and last night hosted 
Maiden. Following the Quincy 
clash, the Raiders are home to 
Revere Tuesday. 

Fred Donahue, a transfer 
from Abp. Williams, turned in 
his finest performance last 
Friday to spark Quincy to a 
63-52 win over Revere. Donahue 



scored 21 points and excelled on 
the boards. Also playing his best 
game was Bill Dacey, who scored 
19 points. Tom McKinnon 
added 10. 

The Presidents, 4-1 overall, 
are 2-0 in the GBL. 

North took a great 66-62 
decision over Somerville's 
perennial GBL powerhouse last 
Friday in its first game at home. 

Trailing, 35-30, at the half, 
North scored 10 points in a row 
to start the second half and 
stayed a few points ahead the 
rest of the way. 

Leading by four with 30 
seconds left, Jed Phelan sank 
three of four foul shots and 
Mark Reale two for two to pull 
North safely ahead. 

"Phelan had his best 
all-around game ever," Nolan 
said. "He scored 21 points and, 
with Tim Clifford, dominated 
the boards. Clifford also has 14 
points and Steve Miller had 15. 



Steve Maloney, playing only 
about a period, did a great job 
and Reale is coming along well 
and scored all five of his points 
in the last period. This win 
should give us a big boost." 

Earlier in the week Quincy 
avenged its only loss in no 
uncertain terms as it bombed B. 
C. High, 62-38. 

In the Presidents' first game 
of the year they blew an 
1 1 -point lead in the last period 
and lost to the Eaglets, 54-53, 
but last week turned in a superb 
two-way game and led all the 
way. 

Mike Cullen led the way with 
•18 points and 12 rebounds and 
Donahue had another big night 
with 16 points and 17 rebounds. 
"Donahue and Cullen were 
outstanding and John McFarlane 
and Bill Joyce had great 
defensive games," Amorosino 
said. "The entire squad did a 
fine job and 1 was able to play 
everyone." 



• Bowling 

Montclair, Brett Teams In Tight Race 



With a one pin difference in 
total team scoring, and with 
identical 25-11 records, the 
Montclair Men's Club and the 
Rep. Joseph E. Brett teams are 
in a tight race for first place in 
the Quincy bowling Little Loop. 

The Men's Club total is 
10,939 pins, the Brett team 
10,938. 



The top 10 bowlers in the 
Loop are Mike Regan, 97.8; Dan 
Finn, 96.19; Brian Connolly, 
95.23; Nick Anastas, 95.17; 
Larry McGrath, 92.2; John 
Andrews, 91.19; Kev Mulvaney, 
91.16; Ken Allman, 91.7; Jim 
McAllister, 91.4; and Ken 
Brodie, 89.0. 

The Brett team scored the 



team high three [1,299] and the 
team high single [465] without 
having a leader in the individual 
scoring. 

Dan Finn of the Burke club 
scored the individual high three 
[332], and Brian Connolly of 
Local 1451 scored the high 
single [134]. 



QJC Set For Worcester 



The Quincy Junior College 
basketball team, which has been 
enjoying the holiday vacation, 
will return to action Tuesday 
night when it meets Worcester 
Junior College at the Worcester 
YMCA. 

The Collejuns will be home to 
Mass. Bay Wednesday at 7:30 
p.m. at. Quincy Vo-Tech and 



then will be idle until Jan. 19 
and 20 when they play in the 
Johnstown, N.Y., tourney at 
Fulton-Montgomery Junior 
College. 

Although owning only a 3-5 
overall record, Coach Earl 
Vermillion's team is 2-1 in the 
Mass. Junior College Conference. 



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Sports Section 



• Track 

Quincy Faces Everett; 
Raiders Meet Chelsea 



At the start of the season 
Coach Tom Hall was looking for 
a .500 season from his Quincy 
track team. 

However, with the Presidents 
sporting a 3-1 record, Hall is 
now hoping for at least a Greater 
Boston League co-championship. 
To achieve this, Quincy must 
defeat Everett, Chelsea and 
North Qiitncy while someone 
upsets unbeaten Maiden. 

The Presidents face Everett 
Saturday at 10:45 a.m. at the 
Medford Cage while Lou Tozzi's 
North Quincy team meets 
Chelsea. 

Last Saturday Quincy 
defeated Somerville, 50-36, 
while North lost to Revere, 
47-39, to drop its record to 2-2. 

In Quincy's win Gary Delorio 
remained undefeated in the 
1000 and Steve Nolan placed 
third. Al Vachon won the 
50-yard dash with Steve Oriola 
third, Steve Burke and Art 
DiLoreto were 1-2 in the hurdles 
[Quincy has won this event in 
every meet with. either Burke or 
DiLoreto on top], Mike 
Varrasso won the shot put with 
his younger brother Bob third, 
DiLoreto won the high jump 
with Sam Gravina third, Dave 
DiBona won the 600, Ken 
O'Brien was second in the 
two-mile, Arnie Vorrosso second 
and Tim Kant third in the mile, 
Brad Kimball second and Harry 
Williams third in the 300. 

DiLoreto, winning the high 
jump for the third time, jumped 
only 5-8. In previous meets he 
did six feet, 5-11 and 5-11 again 
when placing second. 

North's Mark Canavan 
continued to stand out as he 
again was a double winner 
against Revere, staying unbeaten 
in the 1000 and also copping the 
high jump, where he has lost 
only once. Geoff Hennessey also 
remained undefeated in the high 
hurdles. John Flynn, also a 
football and basketball starter, is 
still unbeaten in the 50-yard 
dash. 



John Mackey won the 600 
with Chris Cordeiro third, Art 
Barrett was second in the mile, 
Phil Robinson second and Mike 
Nee and Dennis McGuire tied for 
third in the 300, Sophomore star 
Bart Petracca second in the 
two-mile, Bill Lapsley third in 
the 1000, Brett McGrath third in 
the high jump and Paul Doherty 
third in the shot put. 

In last week's NEAAU-Navy 
meet at the Fargo Building 
Canavan was third overall in the 
half-mile with » good timing of 
1:59.3 and received a trophy. 
Finishing among the top six in 
overall competition were 
Hennessey, Doherty, Cordeiro 
and Petracca. 

Earlier in the week the teams 
reversed opponents and each 
came up with a big win, Quincy 
defeating Revere, 49-37, and 
North rolling over Somerville, 
54-32. 

In Quincy's second win Al 
Vachon won the 50 with Steve 
Oriola third, Dave Pibona took 
the 600 with Brad Kimball 
second. Gary Delorio won the 
1000 with Steve Nolan third. 
Arnie Vorrosso was the two-mile 
winner with Kevin O'Brien third. 
Art DiLoreto took the high 
hurdles with Steve Burke third. 
Mike Varrasso won the shot put 
with Dave Sten third. The relay 
team of Pete Ramponi, Oriola, 
Delorio and DiBona won, 
Ramponi was second in the 300, 
Chip Coletta third in the mile 
and DiLoreto second in the high 
jump. 

For North, Canavan was a 
double winner in the 600 and 
high jump with John Mackey 
second in the 600. Hennessey 
remained unbeaten in the 
hurdles, Flynn won his second 
straight 50-yard dash with Paul 
Doherty second, Chris Cordeiro 
took the 1000, Petracca won the 
mile with Ken O'Brien third, 
Dan Minton won the shot put 
with Doherty second and Brett 
McGrath third to complete a 
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Page 18 Quincy Sun Thursday, January 3, 1974 

• Hockey 

Quincy Wins 4 In Row; Raiders Drop 4 Straight 



Like the basketball team, the 
Quincy High hockey team is 
rolling along with four wins in a 
row following a close opening 
night defeat and Friday night 
will meet Somerville at Boston 
Arena. 

North Quincy, which has lost 
four straight after an impressive 
opening night win, will meet 
Revere. The games get underway 
at 6:30. 

Monday night at 6:30 the 
Presidents will face Maiden while 
North is idle. Maiden handed 
Quincy its only loss to date. 



Next Wednesday North will 
meet Medford at 5 o'clock. 

Bob Sylvia's Quincy team, 
which apparently has solved its 
scoring problems, had a letdown 
in this department last Friday 
but edged Everett, 2-1. 

Frank Guest, having a 
sensational sophomore season, 
put Quincy ahead at 11:15 of 
the opening period but Everett 
tied it in the second session. 
Quincy's winning goal in the 
final period was scored by Pete 
Jan is on a pass from Ted 
Wiedemann. 



O'Brien Club 
Seeks 10th Straight 



The undefeated O'Brien Club 
basketball team of Quincy will 
seek its 10th win in a row, ninth 
in the Cranberry League, Sunday 
night at 7:30 when it hosts the 
Wholey Club of Hull at North 
Quincy High School. 

There is no admission charge. 

The O'Brien Club had one of 
its best games of the year last 
Sunday when it bombed the 
Bristol County Cavaliers of Fall 
River, 134-96. The win gave the 
Quincy powerhouse a two-game 
lead over Roxbury Stars, who 
were upset by the Cavaliers. 
They also lost to Quincy. 

Al Dalton and Ron Bradley, 
who had missed the previous 
game, scored 30 and 26 points 



respectively for the O'Briens, 
followed by Rich Sprague with 
22, Bob McNamara with 16, 
Mike Dunn with 1 2, Eddie Miller 
and Marty Schoeper with 10 
each. 

In its previous game the 
O'Brien Club, with Dalton and 
Bradley missing, had to go into 
overtime to edge Bruce 
Saunders' Weymouth Recreation 
Alphas, 97-93, at Weymouth. 

Pete Schmid scored 33 points, 
Mike Greenlaw 22, Dunn 16, 
Miller 12, Sprague eight and 
McNamara six. 

The O'Brien Club is one of 
the strongest semi-pro teams 
ever to represent Quincy. 



New Red Sox Film 
Available To Groups 



Quincy youth groups, schools 
and sports clubs can obtain free 
of charge the new Red Sox film, 
"Baseball-The Now Career", 
now available through the club's 
public relations office. 

The 26-minute movie is 
narrated by Chuck Connors, 
who went from the Brooklyn 
Dodgers and Chicago Cubs to 
television stardom as 'The 
Rifelman". It contains many 
memorable moments from 
recent years, featuring current 
stars including Hank Aaron, 
Johnny Bench, Nolan Ryan, Tug 



McGraw and Jim Palmer. 

Congressman Vinegar Bend 
Mizell, Dr. Bobby Brown and 
sportscasters Joe Garagiola, Phil 
Rizzutto and Bill White talk 
about the game which gave them 
their start. Ted Williams and 
Casey Stengel are also 
represented with their comments 
about baseball as a career. 

The film can be obtained by 
writing the Red Sox Public 
Relations Dept., Fenway Park, 
Boston 0221 5, or calling the PR 
Dept. at 267-9440. 



Small Captain North Adams 



Jim Small, former North 
Quincy High star and Greater 
Boston League all-star, is captain 
of the North Adams State 
College basketball team. 



North Adams, rated 10th 
among New England small 
colleges, is enjoying another 
outstanding season. 



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Health 
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By Jack Silverstein 

FIREPLACE DANGER 



Normally, the safest place for a 
fire in the home is in the 
fireplace. But, unfortunately, it 
doesn't always stay inside like it 
should. 

A few years back, a 
Massachusetts family of six 
perished in a twenty-one room 
mansion when a smoldering piece 
of wood was flown from a 
fireplace onto a rug during the 
night. Ironically, screens had been 
ordered for all fireplaces in the 
house, but had not arrived. Never i 
- but never - operate a fireplace 
without a screen, regardless of 
how romantic it may be. It's your 
best protection from blowing 
sparks or coals. 

Do you need a chimney sweep? 
Soot bums heartily, and if not 



removed annually, you're likely 
to have a chimney fire that can 
creep through cracks in the 
chimney wall or send a shower of 
sparks onto the roof. If the roof is 
of combustible wood shingles, for 
example, or if the chimney is 
unlined, the danger increases. 

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Ron Erikson's North team, 
which has had trouble getting 
untracked after opening with a 
4-3 upset win over Medford, 
dropped a 4-1 decision to 
Chelsea. 

Earlier in the week the 
Presidents exploded for a 7-3 
win over rival North Quincy, the 
game being quite a contrast to 
the three nip and tuck contests 
between the two last year. 

Guest gave Quincy first blood 
when he soloed at 5:21 of the 



opening period. Andy Colleran 
tied it at 7:39 with Ed Santry 
and Mark Hurley assisting. 

Al Lancione converted passes 
from Guest and John Scott to 
put Quincy ahead again at 0:53 
of the second period, Guest 
scored his second goal with an 
assist by Bob Boyle at 1 :49. Rob 
Henderson scored for North at 
6:37 with assists by Mike 
McLean and Paul O'Donnell, 
Wiedemann made it 4-2 at 8:23 
on a pass from Boyle and he 
scored again unassisted a few 



minutes later. 

In the final session McLean 
scored for . North with Jim 
Mullaney assisting at 0:29 and 
Pete Janis scored Quincy's two 
final goals, the first with 
Wiedemann assisting and the last 
unassisted. 

"Our first two lines finally 
equalized," Sylvia said. "We felt 
all along we had two lines 
capable of being equal." 

The Presidents' coach had 
good words for North. "They 
are aggressive and never give 
up," he said. 



• St. Ann's Hockey 

Northstars, Detroit, Bruins Win 



In St. Ann's Hockey League 
Pee Wee games played last week 
at Shea Rink, the Northstars 
defeated the Flyers, 3-1. 

Scoring for Northstars were 
John Keller, Ed Novack and 
Chris Clark with assists going to 
George LaPointe, Clark and Paul 
Marino. Steve Webb scored an 
unassisted goal for the Flyers. 

Detroit rolled over the 
Flames, 6-2. Andy Gillis scored 
twice for the winners with Frank 
Hogan, Bob Biagini, Steve Hogan 



and Dan Rowley scoring the 
others. Assisting were Kevin 
O'Hanley, Gillis, Hogan, Rowley 
and Ron Puzalte. Joe Crifo had a 
goal and assist and Rich Pierre 
the same for the Flames. 

The Bruins blanked New 
York, 3-0, with Mark Kintogas 
excelling in goal. Mike Millin, 
Greg Kelly and Larry Morton 
had the goals with Al Vasale, 
Bruce Ayers, Millin, Kelly and 
Morton assisting. 

The Pee Wee all-stars played 



their first game Saturday and 
defeated Winthrop, 3-0, at 
Porazzo Rink in East Boston. 
Chris Clark scored with assists 
by Frank LaPierre, Steve Olson 
and Kelly. O'Hanley scored the 
second goal with Eric Olson, 
Gary Stokes and Paul Gagnon 
assisting, and the final goal was 
scored by Rich LaPierre with an 
assist for Biagini. Brian Condon 
and Brian O'Hanley played 
outstanding games in goal. 



ENC Returns To Action Friday 



The Eastern Nazarene College 
basketball team, with a 2-2 
record, has been enjoying its 
annual holiday vacation but 
returns to action Friday and 
Saturday nights in the annual 
Gordon College Tournament. 

ENC will join host Gordon, 
Barrington and Grace College of 
Winoa Lake, Indiana, m the 
event. 

The Crusaders will be home to 
Roger Williams Jan. 1 1 at their 
new Lahue Physical Education 
Center on campus. 

ENC defeated Barrington, 
78-60, to even its record after 
splitting even with Mt. Vernon 
College and losing to 
Southeastern Mass. 

Earlier in the week the 
Crusaders had bowed to 
Southeastern Mass., 96-78, 
despite a 25-point performance 
by Quincy's Rick Reyenger and 
18 points by Gerry Whetstone. 



ENC had opened its season 
and officially opened its new 
gym but was foiled by its former 
coach, Carroll Bradley, who first 
led it to prominence. 

Bradley, who had retired but 
returned to coach at a 
comparatively new college, Mt. 
Vernon Nazarene of Mt. Vernon, 
Ohio, brought a team of 
freshmen to Quincy and, playing 
an outstanding possession game, 
shocked the Crusaders, 37-33. 

A year ago Jim Smith led the 
Crusaders to another 
outstanding season to run his 
three-year record to 71-22, but 
lost five of his standouts, the 
brilliant Ron Bradley, Don 
Constantine, Dave Eads, Steve 
Shoff and Ray Shannon. 

Bradley, one of the finest 
small college players in the 
country, led last year's club with 
a 24.6 game average, followed 
by Eads, 16.7, and Constantine, 



10.2. Bradley and Constantine 
are former North Quincy High 
captains. 

The only returnees with 
varsity experience are Rick 
Reyenger {6-7], former Quincy 
High star; Howie Briggs [6-61, 
and Gerry Whetstone [6-01 . 

Other members of this year's 
inexperienced squad are Dan 
Zink [6-4J, ex-North Quincy 
stickouf, Mike Cox [6-1 1, Tom 
Gunsalus [6-0], Dave Hespell 
[5-10], Doug Lay [6-1], Frank 
Osgood [6-3] of Dorchester, 
Bob Peters [6-0], Mark Sanford 
[6-0] and Gordon Wetmore 
[6-4]. 

Hespell, Osgood and Wetmore 
are only freshmen. 

ENC's cheerleaders this year 
are Capt. Vicki LaLone, Donna 
Chappell, Brenda Derbyshire, 
Agar Espada, Kathy Rhule and 
Diana Schaeffer. Team manager 
is Eben Hedman. 



Middlesex School Trounces Marina Club 



The Middlesex School 
trounced the Harbor Marina 
Tennis Club, 5 matches to 1, 
Saturday in New England Lawn 

Tennis Association Junior 
Indoor Tennis League 
competition for 16-year-olds and 



under. 

The matches: 

Dennis McCarthy [BH] def. 
Tom Garat [Ml 

Eric Berman [M] def. David 
Humburger [BH] 

David Wright and Hugh Kent 
[M] def. Tony Sullivan and 



Peter Kenny [BH] 

Pam Esserian [M] def. Mo 
Higgins [BH] 

Melanie Esserian [M] def. 
Heather Underhill [BH] 

Ursula Pennell and Sheila 
Daiale [M] def. Colleen Cheney 
and Julie Sullivan [BH]. 



Joe McManus Tenns Prizewinner 



Joe McManus of 71 
Presidential Drive, Quincy, is a 
prize winner in a "Name The 
Team" contest recently 



conducted by Boston's franchise 
in the new professional World 
Team Tennis League. 

The winning entry was 'The 



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Thuriday, January 3, 1974 Quincy Sun Page 19 



• Quincy Youth Hockey 

Quincy Wins 12 Of 14 Games Against Canadians 



The Quincy Youth Hockey 
League teams dominated 
weekend games against teams 
from Nashwaakis, New 
Brunswick, Canada, winning 12 
of the 14 games played at the 
Quincy Youth Rink. 

Quincy's Pee Wee "B" teams 
won Saturday, 6-3, and Sunday, 
5-2. Scoring in the Saturday 
game were Brian Sullivan with 
two goals, Timmy Ryan, Danny 
Boyle, Kevin Ryan and Richie 
Stevens. Assists went to Johnny 
Cummings, Sullivan, John 
Toland, Boyle, Mike McNiece, 
Ryan and Chris Corman. 

In the Sunday game McNiece 
and Cummings each had two 
goals and Paul McCabe one. 
Assisting were Mike Sullivan, 
Kevin Ryan; Bobby Kelley, 
Boyle and Stevens. 

The Squirt "A" team sw.pt 
both games, 5-1 on Saturday and 
4-1 Sunday. 

Saturday's scorers were 
Chuckie Marshall with two goals, 
Mark Boussy, Bobby Beniers and 
Robbie Zanardelli. Joey 
Rathgeb, Neil Shea, Tommy 
Heffernan and Beniers had 
assists. 

Sunday Shea had two goals, 
Rathgeb and Kevin Craig one 
each, with Marshall and 
Zanardelli having assists. 

The Pee Wee "B" team 
romped Saturday, 8-0, and won 
again on Sunday, 3-1. 

In the Saturday breeze Billy 
Deitsch had three goals, Lerinie 
Micelli two, John Jackson, Jeff 
Giordani and George Mackey 
one apiece. Assists went to 
Tommy Gerry with two, 
Mackey, John Keaney, Danny 
Sullivan, Len Micelli; Danny 
Cronin and Kenny Halloran. 

In the second game Micelli 
scored twice and Deitsch once. 
Cronin had two assists and Gerry 
one. 

Also sweeping its games was 
the Pee Wee "A" team with a 
5-1 win Saturday and 6-3 
decision Sunday. 

Eddie Kane scored two goals 
Saturday, with Johnny Mullin, 
Paul McDermott and Robbie 
Craig having the others, while 
Bobby Hayes had three assists, 
Brian McGilvray, Craig, Tommy 
Brennan, Scott Richardson and 
Mark Messina one each. 



In the second game Kane had 
two goals, McDermott, Mullin, 
Richardson and Brennan one 
apiece. Assists went to Brennan, 
two, Messina, Brian Norton, 
Hayes, Kevin McGrath and 
Kane. 

The Bantam "B" team 
walloped the Canadian visitors, 
9-4, on Saturday and won a 3-2 
squeaker Sunday. 

In the first game Mike Marks, 
John Fitzgerald and Dave Peters 
all had two goals, with Mark 
Paolucci, Dave Lewis and Mark 
Kelly also scoring. Assisting were 
Kelly with three, Paolucci and 
Peters two each, Marks, Lewis 
and Jeff Gavin. 

In the second game Don 
Perdios, Jim Moore and Marks 
scored while Norton, Fitzgerald, 
Lewis and Paul Higgins had 
assists. 

The Bantam "A" team 
romped, 8-2, Saturday but lost, 
2-1, on Sunday. 

In the easy win Dave Previte, 
Brian Bertoni, Mike McGrath, 
Mark Giordani, Jim Shea, Paul 
Barry, Matt Schaeffer and Mike 
Smith scored with Previte having 
two assists, Tom Cahill, Rick 
Denmar, John Cooney, Shea, 
Rich Troy and Schaeffer having 
assists. 

McGrath scored the goal 
Sunday with Shea having an 
assist. 

The Midget "B" teams also 

broke even, winning, 4-3, 

Saturday, but losing 7-4, 
Sunday. 

In the win John Storer, Joe 
McConville, Bob Page and Walter 
Pimental scored with Bob Page 
and Jeff Murphy assisting. 
Sunday Joe Pistorino had two 
goals, McConville and Larry 
Curtis scored and Mike Conti 
had two assists, Storer, Page, 
Jackie Powers and Steve Neville 
one each. 

The Midget "A" team won 
both games, 4-2 and 5-1. 

In the first game Rick Avery, 
Jack McHugh and Paul Radzie 
scored and McHugh, Mike 
McCauley, Dennis Lynch and 
Brian Nevins had assists. 

Sunday Mike Faherty and 
Nevins scored once each. Avery 
had two assists, Nevins and 
McHugh one apiece. 




■■■■ | 




BUDDY CONALLY [No. 11] fires at the New Brunswick net while Dennis Bertoni [left] ties up a 
visiting defenseman in Midget "B" hockey action Sunday at Quincy Youth Hockey Arena. The Midget 
"B" team bowed to the Canadian, 7-4, after winning, 4-3, on Saturday. 

[Quincy Sun Photo by Laban Whittaker] 

Mite A's Lose Pair; Mite B's In Split 



In weekend of non-league 
games the Mite A team lost to 
Medford, 4-0, and to Pembroke, 
3-2. 

Scoring for Quincy were Paul 
Egan and Rick Reardori with an 
assist by Dwayne Wilcoxin. 



The Mite B team also played 
the same rivals in non-league 
games, defeating Pembroke, 5-2, 
but losing to Medford, 2-1 . 

Joe Harte had three goals, 
Scott Messina and John Burm 
one each against Pembroke, with 



Kevin Greene having two assists, 
Paul Ryan and Messina, Dennis 
Cronin and Mark Masse one 
apiece. 

Against Medford the lone goal 
was scored by Messina with 
Burm and Jack Gabriel assisting. 



Bantam A's Drop Pair, 2-1, 3-1 



The Quincy Bantam "A" 
team dropped a pair of Bay 
Colony Hockey Association 
decisions last week. 

Mike McGrath scored the only 
Quincy goal in a 2-1 loss to 
Weymouth. Rick Dannar and 
Tom Cahill had assists. 

Matt Schaeffer was the goal 
scorer in a 3-1 defeat at the 



hands of Brockton. Brian 
Bertoni assisted. 

The Bantam "B" team fared 
better, beating Braintree, 5-2, 
and walloping Scituate, 7-1, in a 
non-league encounter. 

Mark Kelly had a pair of goals 
and Dave Peters, John Fitzgerald 
and Dave Lewis one each in the 
Braintree game. Mike Marks and 
John Andrews had assists. 



Mark Paolucci scored a goal 
and assisted on three others and 
Kelly had two goals in the 
Scituate contest. 

Fitzgerald, Lewis, Jim 
McConville and Jimmy Moore 
had the other goals with assists 
going to Peters [2], John 
Norton [2], Lewis, Moore and 
Mike Wilson. 



UCT, Keohane's Tie; Davis Edges Harold 



In Pee Wee House League, 
UCT and Keohane's battled to a 
scoreless tie and Davis Insurance 
edged Harold Club, 3-2. 



Scoring for Davis were John 
Lyons with two goals and Bob 
Molloy. Assisting were Ed 
Powers and Mike Hayhurst. 



Tony Kraunelis ?nd John 
McConville scored for Harold 
with assists by Mike Brewster 
and Bob Currier. 



Squirt A's Trounce Weymouth 



Fire Dept., Suburban Tie 



In the Midget House League 
the Fire Dept. and Suburban 
Disposal tied, 2-2. 

Bob Crews and Charlie 
McLean scored for Fire and the 



Suburban goals were scored by 
Paul Vlasakis and Jerry Smith 
with assists by Kevin O'Neil and 
Dan Cetlin. 



Robbie Zanardelli, Chuckie 
Marshall and Kevin Craig did the 
heavy scoring and goalies Kenny 
Mann and Tommy Corliss 
divided the shutout as the 
Quincy Squirt "A" team 
trounced Weymouth, 9-0, in a 
Bay Colony Hockey Association 
game. 

Zanardelli had three goals and 
two assists, Marshall had two 



goals and three assists and Craig 
had two goals and one assist in 
the rout that extended Quincy's 
league record to 1 wins, a loss 
and two ties. 

Mike Quigg and Karl Nord 
had the other goals while Joey 
Rathgeb and Bobby Beniers each 
had two assists and John Carty 
and Kevin Chase had one apiece. 



In a non-league contest, 
Quincy blanked Brookline, 5-0, 
with Marshall collecting a pair of 
goals. 

Beniers had a goal and an 
assist and Rathgeb and Craig 
each had two assists. Singles 
goals were scored by Zanardelli 
and Nord and Tommy Heffernan 
and Carty had assists. 



THE HOCKEY 




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QUINCY 

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PLENTY OF 
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Page 20 Quincy Sun Thursday, January 3, 1974 



I 

i 



HOLLYWOOD HOTLINE 

Energy plentiful 
on Ebsen ranch 



By NANCY ANDERSON 
Copley News Service 

HOLLYWOOD - Buddy 
Ebsen reports there's no sign 
of an energy shortage yet on 
his 35-acre ranch in the Santa 
Monica mountains. At least 
his energy isn't in short sup- 
ply. He spent his recent hiatus 
from "Barnaby Jones" cut- 
ting firewood for his huge, 
stone fireplace. 

Meanwhile, his 22-year-old 
daughter, Bonnie, who made 
her film debut in a segment of 
"Barnaby Jones" is forging 
ahead professionally with a 
role in "Marctis Welby." 

+ + + 
Perhaps you saw Jimmy 
Stewart and Lew Ayres work- 
ing together in a segment of 
"Hawkins." But did you real- 
ize their last mutual assign- 
ment prior to that was "The 
Ice Follies of 1939" in which 
they played the two ends of a 
waltzing horse? No, I don't 
know which actor was which 
end. 

+ + + 
Burt Sugarman always 
hoped he'd become the richest 
kid on the block, but not even 
he predicted 15 years ago that 
he'd eventually own the block 
where he, at that time, rented 
parking spaces for a couple of 
used cars he was trying to sell 
to help pay his way through 
USC. Now Burt, a TV pro- 
ducer, not only owns the 
block, but a number of car 
agencies and a finance com- 
pany. Still his most consum- 
ing interest, is his television 
output, "The Midnight Spe- 
cial" and "The Wizard of 
Odds." 



"Rosemary's Baby" pro- 
ducer William Castle will turn 
actor for a role in "The Sex 
Symbol," an ABC-TV "Movie 
of The Week." ... Former Los 
Angeles Police Chief Tom 
Reddin is playing a dramatic 
role in "Whiplash," an epi- 
sode of "Police Story." ... 
And Brig. Gen. James 
McDevitt, the astronaut who 
reported seeing an unidenti- 
fied flying object during a 
manned space flight, is mak- 
ing his acting debut in "Out Of 
This World," a segment of 
"The Brady Bunch." 

+ + + 
More casting news: 
Gary Crosby will get star 
billing as a new regular in 
"Chase." This will be 
Crosby's first series as a 
regular since "The Bill Dana 
Show;" although he has been 
appearing on a semi-regular 
basis on "Adam-12" and 
"Emergency." 

Though some members of 
the "Chase" cast were axed 
recently, Wayne Maunder and 
Mitchell Ryan will continue 
and will share star status with 
Crosby. 

+ + + 

I talked with Jim Stacy the 
day after he got his new arm, 
and his courage was high. Jim 
is surviving terrible tragedy 
with such fortitude, I predict 
he will become one of the 
great men of the entertain- 
ment industry. He used to say 
he'd like to write some day. 
Maybe one day he'll win an 
Oscar for a screenplay or 
even a Pulitzer prize for 
something heavier. 



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* Assorted Hot and Cold Dishes 

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* Cheeses - Coffee or Tea 

All this for only $3.00 



WALSH'S 
RESTAURANT 



A Sun Review 



Alice Faye, John Payne Bring Back 
Fond Memories In 'Good News' 



By WILLIAM JEROME 

With the increase in college 
tuitions let me give you some 
good news. Tait offers you a full 
academic year for less than 
$10. 

You can stroll the quadrangle, 
live it up at the "Sweet Shoppe" 
with your date, root your heart 
out at the stadium and ready 
yourself for the Prom at the 
Boat House. 

By enrolling now at the 
Colonial Theatre in Boston you 
become a "Viking". You'll sing 
and dance and cavort with 32 
wonderful college pals. The 
prettiest co-eds this side of 
Vassar and the most dashing and 
stylish college boys this side of 
Skidmore. 

Your repertoire includes 17 
songs - with almost as many 
dances. Such favorites as 
"Happy Days", "The Best 
Things in Life Are Free", 
"Button Up Your Overcoat", 
"You're the Cream in My 
Coffee", "Varsity Drag", "Keep 
Your Sunny Side Up" and the 
title song, "Good News." 

Alice Faye - the 30's and 40's 
film sweetheart - brings a patina 
of mellowness and warmth to 
her role. 

She is librarian-like, but her 
trim figure moves well in dance 



and she is an attractive woman 
despite the years. There is a 
special qualify to her low 
voice-she is "miked" for 
the show-sings naturally and 
effortlessly. 

John Payne, romantic lead to 
Miss Faye on the movie screen, 
is just Mr. Nice Guy, back with 
us from the side-lines (or wings). 
He is dapper in his pin stripe 
double breasted suit, cuts a 
handsome figure and let me say 
while he is no Gene Kelly, he 
dances well. Alice and John 
re-united on the Boston 
stage-it's a heart-throb and 
brings down the house. Kudos to 
them both-they are "Good 
News". 

Harry Rigby believes in this 
nostalgia bit. College back in the 
"thirties." Carefree and cute. 
You sit back and relax for two 
and a half hours. Rigby has a 
way of re-threading the time 
spool. As a producer he has 
already given us revivals of "No 
No Nanette" and "Irene." 

This is a brand new package. 
Dec. 17 was the opening. The 
play remains four weeks then 
begins its seven month tour of 
the U.S. Philadelphia, Detroit, 
Toronto, of course, Los Angeles, 
San Francisco, assorted cities 
across the continent and 
possibly back to Boston and 
then on to New York City. 



By that time half the country 
should be toe tapping, warbling 
the happy, catchy old tunes, 
wearing belt-backed coats, 
pork-pie hats, wild plaids and 
marvelous shawl, wool cardigans. 
And with pipes of course. 

The gals have their long 
pleated skirts, smart sweater 
sets, cloche hats, and Prom 
gowns. 

Abe Burrows, is the 
chancellor, so to speak. He 
adapted and directed this 
original by Lawrence Schwab, B. 
G. DeSylva and Frank Mandel. 
Every nuance is perfect. No 
trouble-talk. Funny sequences 
and repetition amongst the 
co-eds. Slap! "I needed that" or 
"You're stepping on my toes." 
The plot is simple. You all get 
"A" without any research. 

The play is a clergyman's 
dream. No one i% after anything 
they shouldn't be, no one loses 
anything they shouldn't. The 
college patter is palatable. Cast is 
handsome, agreeable and 
talented. The young stars are 
mothered so to speak by the 
elder ones, Alice Faye, John 
Payne and Stubby Kaye. 

It's really a place you'd like to 
visit and maybe live. Enroll now, 
at the Colonial Theatre-be a 
"Viking." 



Sandblom Resigns As City Tourism Director 



R. Joseph Sandblom has 
resigned Saturday from his 
$7,782 a year job as director of 
tourism in the Hannon 
Administration to accept a job 
as New England Regional 
manager for a South Shore-based 
insurance agency. 

Sandblom concluded his tour 
of municipal duty with a ringing 



endorsement of Mayor Walter J. 
Hannon and an attack on his 
detractors. His letter of 
resignation to the Mayor said: 

"I am confident that your 
second term as mayor will prove 
to be as successful as your first 
term and that the small radical 
fringe groups in Quincy will 
come to realize that government 



is set up to serve all citizens, not 
just a select few. 

"I know that you will 
continue to make 
straight- forward decisions for 
the good of all the residents of 
Quincy and that you will not .he 
affected by the slurs and 
inuendos that have been 
prevalent during the past few 
months." 



Pasquale DiStefano Elected QCA President 



Pasquale S. DiStefano of 38 
Payne St., Quincy, has been 
elected president of the Quincy 
Citizens Association. 

DiStefano, a social service 
worker at the South Shore 
Community Service Center, 
pledged that he would make the 
association's proposed 10-story 



height limit on Quincy building 
the paramount goal of his 
administration. 

Richard P. Ward of 120 
Putnam St. was elected vice 

president; J. Thomas Mullaney 
of 115 Standish Ave. was 
re-elected treasurer; and Miss 



Dorothy C. Kelly of 108 Davis 
St. was chosen for another term 
as secretary. 

Dr. Lawrence Creedon, 
Quincy's superintendent of 
schools, spoke to the group on 
the subject of open campus and 
the Quincy Method of 
Education. 



Senator Kennedy To Speak At Chamber Forum 



Senator Edward M. Kennedy 
will make his first South Shore 
appearance in a year at a special 
South Shore Chamber of 
Commerce luncheon Tuesday, 
Jan. 8. 



The Public Affairs Forum, to 
be held at 12:15 p.m. at Lantana 
in Randolph, will include 
remarks by the Senator on 
Congressional action affecting 
the South Shore. Kennedy will 



answer questions posed by 
attendees. 

Reservations for the luncheon 
meeting may be made by 
contacting the Chamber at 
479-1111. 



Sterling Advisory Council Meeting Tonight 



An organizational meeting of 
all parents who indicated 
interest in being elected to the 
Sterling Junior High Parents' 
Advisory Council will be held 



tonight [Thursday] at 7:30 p.m. 
in the Sterling Junior High 
Cafeteria. 

Purpose of the meeting will be 
to identify nominees to the 



IN THE 
FIRESIDE LOUNGE 



125 SEA ST. .QUINCY 471-1623 



•30 J 



9 BILLINGS RD. NORTH QUINCY 773 5508 



Council by grade prior to an 
election. The Council will 
consist of two parents at each 
grade level [total 6] , one parent 
chairman, the principal, assistant 
principal and a teacher 
representative-at-large for a total 
of 10 members. 

YMCA Guitar 

The Quincy YMCA will offer 
a 1 0-week beginner guitar course 
for youth and adults beginning 
Tuesday, Jan. 8. 

The following classes are 
available: 

Youth - Tuesday 1:30 - 2:30 
p.m. - 8 to 10 year olds; 2:30 - 
3:30 p.m. - 8 to 10 year olds; 
3:30 - 4:30 p.m. - 8 to 12 year 
olds; 4:30- 5:30 p.m. - 13 to 15 
year olds; 5:30 - 6:30 p.m. - 
continuing Beginners. 

Adults - Tuesday evening 7 - 8 
p.m. - continuing beginners; 8 - 9 
p.m. - beginners; 9-10 p.m. - 
beginners. 



I DEATHS 

Mrs. Jane [Fields] Pinel, 80, 
of 1000 Southern Artery, at the 
Elihu White Nursing Home, Dec 
24. 

Mrs. Mary H. [Huse] Allen, 
52, of 25 Morton St., at'Quincy 
City Hospital, Dec. 23. 

Ernest F. Barker, 58, of 100 
Cross Road, Braintree, formerly 
ofQuincy, at his home, Dec. 25. 

Mrs. Janette [Bowie] 
Graham, 75, ofEnglewood, N.J., 
formerly of Quincy, at 
Englewood Hospital, Dec. 23. 

Mrs. Mary D. [Herbert] 
Finch, 89, of 267 North St., 
North Weymouth, formerly of 
Quincy, at South Shore 
Hospital, Weymouth, Dec. 24. 

William Knowles, 76, of 114 
Curtis Ave., unexpectedly at 
Quincy City Hospital, Dec. 23. 

Mrs. Irene [Sitler] Hanigan, 

77, of 20 Wollaston Ave., at 
Quincy City Hospital, Dec. 25. 

Mrs. Diane L. [Thibodeau] 
Hernandez, 28, of 1722 Crab tree 
Road, Hixson, Tenn., formerly 
of Quincy, at Erlanger Hospital, 
Chattanooga, Tenn., Dec. 24. 

Mrs. Anna M. [Regan] Shea, 

78, of 809 Hancock St., at the 
Quincy Nursing Home, Dec. 26. 

Mrs. Martha [Woodward] 
Arey of 71 Robertson St., at her 
home, Dec. 25. 

Col. Andrew L. Baker, 52, of 
99 Knollwood Circle, Weymouth 
Landing, formerly of Quincy, 
unexpectedly at South Shore 
Hospital, Weymouth, Dec. 26. 



MEMORIAL 
GIFTS 

EVERYTHING THAT IS 

WORTHWHILE & 

APPRECIATED BY 

YOUR CHURCH 

A.E.GOODHUE 

COMPANY 
VESTMENT MANUFACTURERS 
500 IN STOCK 
1163 HANCOCK ST. 
QUINCY 472-3090 



Thursday, January 3, 1974 Quincy Sun Page 21 



Mrs. Florence E. [Schwartz] 
Remick, 74, of 576 Quarry St., 
at Parker Hill Medical Center, 
Boston, Dec. 23. 

Mrs. Grace E. [Duffy] 
McCormack, 80, of 16 Hovey 
St., on arrival at Quincy City 
Hospital, Dec. 23. 

Ernest J. Forsberg, 76, of 37 
Veronica Lane, East Weymouth, 
formerly of Quincy, at Colonial 
Nursing Home, Weymouth, Dec. 
24. 

Mrs. Evellyn [Usher] Clough, 
73 Bicknell St., at her home, 
Dec. 22. 

Samuel J. McCullough, 73, of 
89 Gerard Road, Norwell, 
formerly of Quincy, at an 
out-of-town hospital, Dec. 22. 

George L. Lancy, 74, of 6620 
NW 24th Court, Ft. Lauderdale, 
Fla., formerly of Quincy, at his 
home, Dec. 22. 

Norman Rosenthal, 73, of 
105 Alstead St., at Quincy City 
Hospital, Dec. 22. 

John P. Bevis, 64, of 39 
Vershire St., at Quincy City 
Hospital, Dec. 22. 

George S. Leavitt, 23, of 362 
Center St., at South Shore 
Hospital, Dec. 22. 

Mrs. Margaret [McA voy] 
McConville, 67, of 116 
Farrington St., at Quincy City 
Hospital, Dec. 26. 

Mrs. Nicoletta [Sacchetti] 
Quintiliani, 95, of 148 Liberty 
St., at Rest Haven Nursing 
Home, Braintree, Dec. 25. 

Mrs. Delia C. [McDermott] 
Moore, 82, of 9 Burnham St., 
Somerville, formerly of Quincy, 
at Otis Hospital, Cambridge, 
Dec. 24. 

Joseph Cardarell, 68, of 15 
Oak Lawn Road, North 
Smithfield, R.I., formerly of 
Quincy, at Fogarty Hospital, 
North Smithfield, Dec. 24. 

Richard F. Morrison, 53, of 
52 Chickatabut Road, at a local 
nursing home, Dec. 24. 



■ As one of the leading funeral directors in more 
than 850 cities affiliated with National Selected 
Morticians, we place family interests first. 

■ ■ To us that means helping families 

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KEOHANE FUNERAL HOME 

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773-3551 




Mrs. Jane [MacLennan] 
Phillips, 81, of New Hartford, 
Conn., formerly of Quincy, at 
Bolleswood Hospital, Avon, 
Conn., Dec. 27. 

Miss Mary Louise Logan, 50, 
of 173 Highland Ave., at New 
England Deaconness Hospital, 
Boston, Dec. 26. 

Mrs. Doris E. [Whit taker] 
Nylen, 55, of 25 Meadow Lane, 
Weymouth, formerly of Quincy, 
at Massachusetts General 
Hospital, Boston, Dec. 26. 

Angelo DiGiusto, 91, of 31 
Dysart St., at the Quincy 
Nursing Home, Dec. 27. 

Harold L. Hardy, 54, of 44 
Staten Rd, Braintree, formerly 
of Quincy, on arrival at Quincy 
City Hospital, Dec. 27. 

Mrs. Flora May [Raymond] 
Handy, 98, of Abington, 
formerly of Quincy, at the 
Mildred Alford Nursing Home, 
Dec. 27. 

William M. Babcock, 76, of 36 
Edward St., at a Weymouth 
nursing home, Dec. 27. 

Russell F. Nord of Randolph, 
formerly of Quincy, at Milton 
Hospital, Dec. 26. 

Augustus P. Devaney, 81, of 
29 Glenview Rd, at the VA 
Hospital, Brockton, Dec. 27. 

Edward D. Veno, 68, of 290 
E St., South Boston, formerly of 
Quincy, at New England Medical 
Center, Dec. 27. 

William C. Todd, 83, of 30 
Gladstone St., at Quincy City 
Hospital, Dec. 29. 

F. Lester Sprague, 80, of 17 
Muster Field Rd, Plymouth, 
formerly of Quincy, at a 
Plymouth nursing home, Dec. 
27. 

Mrs. Olga [Lindquist] 
Carlson, 82, of 47 Kidder St., at 
Quincy City Hospital, Dec. 28. 

John E. Hennessy, 58, of 163 
Darrow St., at Quincy City 
Hospital, Dec. 27. 



'Survival Sunday' 
To Be Observed Feb. 3 



"Survival Sunday" will be 
held in the churches and temples 
of Quincy Feb. 3 in support of 
the work of Survival Inc., the 
Quincy-based drug and youth 
program. 

The concept, the idea of Rev. 
John Graham, Survival 
President, and Robert Hassey, 
Survival Executive Director, has 
been approved by the Quincy 
Clergy Association. It is planned 
to bring more information 
regarding the many services of 
the agency to Quincy residents 
as well as to provide funds to aid 
the continuing activity of the 
non-profit agency. 

Survival, whose activities have 
expanded since the May hiring 
of Hassey, continues to serve not 
only young persons with 
problems but parents as well. Its 
Walk-In Center offers help in 
times of crisis as well as on a 
long term basis. The hotline 
offers instant help 24 hours a 
day. 

The Joseph H. Whiteman 
House is taking in young people 
who can benefit from a halfway 
house living situation. The 
agency is active within court and 
prison systems in order to more 
properly treat persons involved 
in these institutions. In addition, 
the agency provides a wide range 
of education information, and 
referral to individuals and 
organizations on the South 
Shore. Although drugs continue 
to be a problem, young people 
experiencing a wide range of 
difficulties are now helped by 
Survival. 

A planning committee 
consisting of Rev. Graham, 
Hassey, Rev. Edward Flaherty of 
St. Ann's Church, Rev. William 
Underhill of St. Chrysostom's 
Church, and Rabbi Jacob Mann 
of Beth Israel Synagogue has 
been meeting to coordinate the 
arrangements of the event. 

Present plans for the event are 
two-fold: First, members of 
Survival's Board of Directors, 
staff, and volunteers will be 
made available on the Sunday to 
speak for a moment or two 
during the service, meet with 
members of the congregation at 
a social hour, or talk with any 
other group. Second, to help 
raise funds for the Survival 



operation, religious groups will 

St. John's To Present 
Talent Show, Musical Revue 



St. John's Parish Centennial 
Committee will present a parish 
talent show and musical revue 
March 8 and 9 at the Archbishop 
Williams High School under the 
direction of Carl Pitaro. 



•:«K»>jj*jj£jvg 



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ROY'S YL0WERS 

H WASHINGTON ST 
QUINCY 

472-1900 

Major credit cards 
accepted by phone. 



WmiMmMMM 




Rehearsals for the show will 
begin Sunday Jan. 6 from 3 to 5 
p.m. in the lower part of St. 
John's convent. All parishioners 
are invited to participate and 
attend the rehearsals. All types 
of musical talents are sought. 
Persons desirous of participating 
should contact the show 
co-chairmen, Mr. and Mrs. 
William E. Donnelly. 

James Duggan and Putnam 
Borden are co-chairmen of the 
show program book. Paul 
Beatrice is in charge of props 
and Mrs. Daniel Shea and Mrs. 
John Hanratty will be in charge 
of the tickets. 




be encouraged to make a 
contribution to Survival, take a 
special offering during the 
services, or make an offering 
plate available at the door so 
that people may donate as they 
leave the services. 

The event, according to Rev. 
Graham and Hassey, has the 
potential to benefit many 
persons. The agency anxiously 
awaits the expected large 
response from Quincy churches 
and temples. 

LEGAL NOTICES 

COMMONWEALTH OF 
MASSACHUSETTS 

Norfolk, ss. Probate Court 

No. 199,421 

To all persons interested in the 
estate of DEBORAH HOFFMAN late 
of Quincy in said County, deceased. 

A petition has been presented to 
said Court praying that ALFRED S. 
SWANSON of Weymouth in the 
County of Norfolk be appointed 
administrator of said estate without 
giving a surety on his bond. 

If you desire to object thereto you 
or your attorney should file a written 
appearance in said Court at Dedham 
before ten o'clock in the forenoon on 
the twenty-third day of January 
1974, the return day of this citation. 

Witness, ROBERT M. FORD, 
Esquire, First Judge of said Court, t 
this nineteenth day of December 
1973. 

PAUL C. GAY, 
Register. 
1/3-10-17/74 

COMMONWEALTH OF 

MASSACHUSETTS 

Norfolk, ss. Probate Court 

No. 196,726 

To all persons interested in the 
estate of LEO E. MULLIN late of 
Quincy in said County, deceased. 
And to the Attorney General of said 
Commonwealth, if required. 

A petition has been presented to 
said Court, praying that STEPHEN T. 
KEEFE, JR. ofQuincy in the County 
of Norfolk be appointed 
administrator with the will annexed 
of said estate not already 
administered, without giving a surety 
on his bond. 

If you desire to object thereto you 
or your attorney should file a written 
appearance in said Court at Dedham 
before ten o'clock in the forenoon on 
the thirtieth day of January 1974, 
the return day of this citation. 

Witness, ROBERT M. FORD 
Esquire, First Judge of said Court' 
tins twenty-first day of December 
1973. 

PAUL C. GAY, 
1/3-10-17/74 RCgiSter - 



COMMONWEALTH OF 

MASSACHUSETTS 

Norfolk, ss. Probate Court 

No. 114,954 

To all persons interested in the 
estate of TERESA DiPRISCO late of 
Quincy in said County, deceased, and 
to JOHN A. HUTCHINS of 
Weymouth in the County of Norfolk, 
trustee, who has not resigned. And to 
the Attorney General of said 
Commonwealth, if required. 

A petition has been presented to 
said Court praying that JOHN A. 
HUTCHINS be removed from his 
office as trustee, and that WILLIAM 
B. LAMPREY of Braintree in the 
County of Norfolk or some other 
suitable person, be appointed his 
successor. 

If you desire to object thereto you 
or your attorney should file a written 
appearance in said Court at Dedham 
before ten o'clock in the forenoon on 
the twenty-third day of January 
1974, the return day of this citation 
and you said JOHN A. HUTCHINS 
are cited to appear in said Court at 
10:00 a.m. on said return day to 
resign. 

Witness, ROBERT M. FORD, 
Esquire, First Judge of said Court, 
this nineteenth day of December 
1973. 

PAUL C. GAY, 

Register. 
1/3-10-17/74 



I 



Page 22 Quincy Sun Thursday, January 3, 1974 



LEGAL NOTICE 



LEGAL NOTICES 



LEGAL NOTICES 



LEGAL NOTICES 



LEGAL NOTICES 



COMMONWEALTH OF 

MASSACHUSETTS 

Norfolk, ss. Probate Court 

No. 175,274 

To all persons interested in the 
estate of JAMES J. McDONALD late 
of Quincy in said County, deceased. 
And to the Attorney General of said 
Commonwealth, if required. 

The executrix of the will of said 
deceased has presented to said Court 
for allowance her first and final 
account. 

If you desire to object thereto you 
or your attorney should file a written 
appearance in said Court at Dedham 
before ten o'clock in the forenoon on 
the twenty-third day of January 
1974, the return day of this citation. 

Witness, ROBERT M. FORD, 
Esquire, First Judge of said Court, 
this nineteenth day of December 
1973. 

PAUL C. GAY, 
Register. 
1/3-10-17/74 



COMMONWEALTH OF 

MASSACHUSETTS 

Norfolk, ss. Probate Court 

No. 199,300 

To all persons interested in the 
estate of GIUSEPPE MARINELLI 
late of Quincy in said County, 
deceased. And to the Attorney 
General of said Commonwealth, if 
required. 

A petition has been presented to 
said Court for probate of a certain 
instrument purporting to be the last 
will of said deceased by PETER 
MACDONALD of Quincy in the 
County of Norfolk and JOHN 
HENDERSON LINSLEY of Cohasset 
in the County of Norfolk praying 
that they be appointed executors 
thereof without giving a surety on 
their bonds. 

If you desire to object thereto you 
or your attorney should file a written 
appea^nce in said Court at Dedham 
before ten o'clock in the forenoon on 
the twenty-third day of January 
1974, the return day of this citation. 

Witness, ROBERT M. FORD, 
Esquire, First Judge of said Court, 
this seventeenth day of December 
1973. 

PAUL C. GAY, 
Register. 
12/27 1/3-10/74. 



ANNUAL MEETING 

The Annual Meeting of the 
Members of Colonial Federal Savings 
and Loan Association of Quincy, will 
be held on January 16,1974 at 4:30 
P.M. at the office of the Association, 
15 Beach Street, in Quincy, 
Massachusetts, for the election of 
directors, for receiving reports of the 
officers and for the transaction of 
any business that legally may come 
before the meeting. 

Colonial Federal Savings and 

Loan Association of Quincy 

Roy L. Sidelinger, 

Secretary. 

1/3-10/74 



mk 



MUSCULAR 
DYSTROPHY 



FILL OUT THIS SUBSCRIPTION BLANK AND MAIL 

TO THE QUINCY SUN 1101 HANCOCK ST.; QUINCY 02108 

52 ISSUES FOR $3.60 




COMMONWEALTH OF 

MASSACHUSETTS 

Norfolk, ss. Probate Court 

No. 199,428 

To all persons interested in the 
estate of JOHN GOULD late of 
Quincy in said County, deceased. 
And to the Attorney General of said 
Commonwealth, if required. 

A petition has been presented to 
said Court for probate of a certain 
instrument purporting to be the last 
will of said deceased by MARJORIE 
G. HUNTINGTON of Quincy in the 
County of Norfolk praying that she 
be appointed executrix thereof 
without giving a surety on her bond. 

If you desire to object thereto you 
or your attorney should file a written 
appearance in said Court at Dedham 
before ten o'clock in the forenoon on 
the twenty-third day of January 
1974, the return day of this citation. 

Witness, ROBERT M. FORD, 
Esquire, First Judge of said Court, 
this seventeenth day of December 
1973. 

PAUL C. GAY, 
Register. 
12/27 1/3-10/74 

COMMONWEALTH OF 

MASSACHUSETTS 

Norfolk, ss. Probate Court 

No. D-33565 

To HERBERT J. PILKINGTON of 
Parts Unknown. 

A libel has been presented to said 
Court by your wife ROSEMARY A. 
PILKINGTON of Quincy in the 
County of Norfolk praying that a 
divorce from the bond of matrimony 
between herself and you be decreed 
for the cause of cruel and abusive 
treatment and further praying that 
she be allowed to resume her maiden 
name, to wit: ROSEMARY A. 
NORCOTT. 

If you desire to object thereto, 
you or your attorney should file a 
written appearance in said Court at 
Dedham within twenty-one days 
from the thirteenth day of March 
1974, the return day of this citation. 

Witness, ROBERT M. FORD, 
Esquire, First Judge of said Court, 
this thirteenth day of December 
1973. 

PAUL C. GAY, 
Register. 
12/27 1/3-10/74. 

COMMONWEALTH OF 

MASSACHUSETTS 
Norfolk, ss. Probate Court 

No. 199,244 

To all persons interested in the 
estate of MORRIS SILVERMAN late 
of Quincy in said County, deceased. 

A petition has been presented to 
said Court for probate of a certain 
instrument purporting to be the last 
will of said deceased by MORTON 
SILVERMAN of Denver in the State 
of Colorado and RENA A. 
SILVERMAN of Quincy in the 
County of Norfolk praying that they 
be appointed executors thereof 
without giving a surety on their 
bonds. 

If you desire to object thereto you 
or your attorney should file a written 
appearance in said Court at Dedham 
before ten o'clock in the forenoon on 
the ninth day of January 1974, the 
return day of this citation. 

Witness, ROBERT M. FORD, 
Esquire, First Judge of said Court, 
this third day of December 1973. 

PAUL C. GAY, 
Register. 
12/13-20 1/3/74 



SUBSCRIPTION FORM 



COMMONWEALTH OF 

MASSACHUSETTS 

Norfolk, ss. Probate Court 

No. 199,426 

To all persons interested in the 
estate of FLORENCE KING COPE 
also known as FLORENCE K. COPE 
late of Quincy in said County, 
deceased. And to the Attorney 
General of said Commonwealth, if 
required. 

A petition has been presented to 
said Court for probate of a certain 
instrument purporting to be the last 
will of said deceased by THE FIRST 
NATIONAL BANK OF BOSTON, 
successor in title to OLD COLONY 
TRUST COMPANY, of Boston in the 
County of Suffolk praying that it be 
appointed executor thereof without 
giving a surety on its bond. 

If you desire to object thereto you 
or your attorney should file a written 
appearance in said Court at Dedham 
before ten o'clock in the forenoon on 
the twenty-third day of January 
1974, the return day of this citation. 

Witness, ROBERT M. FORD, 
Esquire, First Judge of said Court, 
this seventeenth day of December 
1973. 

PAUL C. GAY, 
Register. 
12/27 1/3-10/74 

COMMONWEALTH OF 
MASSACHUSETTS 

Norfolk, ss. Probate Court 

No. 199,140 

To all persons interested in the 
estate of HILARY T. MELLYN late 
of Quincy in said County, deceased. 

A petition has been presented to 
said Court praying that ARTHUR R. 
MELLYN of Quincy in the County 
of Norfolk be appointed 
administrator of said estate without 
giving a surety on his bond. 

If you desire to object thereto you 
or your attorney should file a written 
appearance in said Court at Dedham 
before ten o'clock in the forenoon on 
the sixteenth day of January 1974, 
the return day of this citation. 

Witness, ROBERT M. FORD, 
Esquire, First Judge of said Court, 
this twenty-ninth day of November 
1973. 

PAUL C. GAY, 
Register. 
12/27 1/3-10/74 

COMMONWEALTH OF 

MASSACHUSETTS 

Norfolk, ss. Probate Court 

No. 199,332 

To all persons interested in the 
estate of CLYDE W. HASKINS late 
of Quincy in said County, deceased. 
And to the Attorney General of said 
Commonwealth, if required. 

A petition has been presented to 
said Court for probate of a certain 
instrument purporting to be the last 
will of said deceased by SOUTH 
SHORE NATIONAL BANK, of 
Quincy in the County of Norfolk 
praying that it be appointed executor 
thereof without giving a surety on its 
bond. 

If you desire to object thereto you 
or your attorney should file a written 
appearance in said Court at Dedham 
before ten o'clock in the forenoon on 
the sixteenth day of January 1974, 
the return day of this citation. 

Witness, ROBERT M. FORD, 
Esquire, First Judge of said Court, 
this thirteenth day of December 
1973. 

PAUL C. GAY, 
Register. 
12/20-27 1/3/74 




STATE 



CHECK ONE OF TWO BOXES BELOW 

[ ] ENCLOSED IS MY CHECK FOR $3.50 
[ ] PLEASE BILL ME FOR $3.50 
OUT OF STATE $450 





COMMONWEALTH OF 

MASSACHUSETTS 

Norfolk, ss. Probate Court 

No. 199,255 

To all persons interested in the 
estate of COSTANZO STRACCO' 
late of Quincy in said County, 
deceased. 

A petition has been presented to 
said Court for probate of a certain 
instrument purporting to be the last 
will of said deceased by GINO J. 
STRACCO of Quincy in the County 
of Norfolk praying that he be 
appointed executor thereof without 
giving a surety on his bond. 

If you desire to object thereto you 
or your attorney should file a written 
appearance in said Court at Dedham 
before ten o'clock in the forenoon on 
the ninth day of January 1974, the 
return day of this citation. 

Witness, ROBERT M. FORD, 
Esquire, First Judge of said Court, 
this third day of December 1973. 

PAUL C. GAY, 
Register. 
12/20-27 1/3/74 

COMMONWEALTH OF 

MASSACHUSETTS 

Norfolk, ss. Probate Court 

No. D-33600 

To JOHN P. BARTER of 600 
Lindell Boulevard, Delray in the 
State of Florida. 

A- libel has been presented to said 
Court by your wife JEANINE D. 
BARTER of Quincy in the County of 
Norfolk praying that a divorce from 
the bond of matrimony between 
herself and you be decreed for the 
cause of cruel and abusive treatment 
and praying for alimony and for 
custody of and allowance for minor 
children. 

If you desire to object thereto, 
you or your attorney should file a 
written appearance in said Court at 
Dedham within twenty-one days 
from the sixth day of March 1974, 
the return day of this citation. 

Witness, ROBERT M. FORD, 
Esquire, First Judge of said Court, 
this thirteenth day of December 
1973. 

PAUL C. GAY, 
Register. 
12/27 1/3-10/74 

COMMONWEALTH OF 

MASSACHUSETTS 

Norfolk, ss. Probate Court 

No. 199,376 

To all persons interested in the 
estate of MYLES A. McDONOUGH 
late of Quincy in said County, 
deceased. And to the Attorney 
General of said Commonwealth, if 
required. 

A petition has been presented to 
said Court for probate of a certain 
instrument purporting to be the last 
will of said deceased by ELSIE K. 
McDONOUGH of Quincy in the 
County of Norfolk praying that she 
be appointed executrix thereof 
without giving a surety on her bond. 

If you desire to object thereto you 
or your attorney should file a written 
appearance in said Court at Dedham 
before ten o'clock in the forenoon on 
the sixteenth day of January 1974, 
the return day of this citation. 

Witness, ROBERT M. FORD, 

Esquire, First Judge of said Court, 

this eleventh day of December 1973. 

PAUL C. GAYJ 

Register. 

12/27 1/3-10/74 



LOST PASSBOOK 

The following Passbook No. 3116-3 
has been lost, destroyed or stolen and 
application for payment has been 
made in accordance with Section 20, 
Chapter 167, General Laws. The 
finder will please return to the 
Granite Co-operative Bank, 440 
Hancock St., North Quincy, Mass. 
02171. 
12/27 1/3/74 



For Home 
Delivery 

Cmtt 
471-3100 



COMMONWEALTH OF 

MASSACHUSETTS 

Norfolk, ss. Probate Court 

No. 199,253 

To the Attorney General of said 
Commonwealth, if required, and to 
all persons interested in the estate of 
DOMENIC DiTULLIO late of Quincy 
in said County, deceased. 

A petition has been presented to 
said Court for probate of a certain 
instrument purporting to be the last 
will of said deceased by ANGELINA 
M. DiTULLIO of Quincy in the 
County of Norfolk praying that she 
be appointed executrix thereof. 

If you desire to object thereto you 
or your attorney should file a written 
appearance in said Court at Dedham 
before ten o'clock in the forenoon on 
the ninth day of January, 1974, the 
return day of this citation. 

Witness, ROBERT M. FORD, 
Esquire, First Judge of said Court, 
this fifth day of Decembert 1973. 

PAUL C. GAY, 
Register. 
12/20-27 1/3/74 

COMMONWEALTH OF 

MASSACHUSETTS 

Norfolk, ss. Probate Court 



No 



199\342 



To all persons interested in the 
estate of ALICE E. WHALEN late of 
Quincy in said County, deceased. 

A petition has been presented to 
said Court praying that GERTRUDE 
T. CICCONI of Milton in the County 
of Norfolk be appointed 
administratrix of said estate without 
giving a surety on her bond, and 
further praying that the will dated 
May 3, 1949 and codicil dated 
December 12, 1950 be disallowed. 

If you desire to object thereto you 
or your attorney should file a written 
appearance in said Court at Dedham 
before ten o'clock in the forenoon on 
the sixteenth day of January 1974, 
the return day of this citation. 

Witness, ROBERT M. FORD, 
Esquire, First Judge of said Court, 
this thirteenth day of December 
1973. 

PAUL C. GAY, 
Register. 
12/20-27 1/3/74 

COMMONWEALTH OF 

MASSACHUSETTS 

Norfolk, ss. Probate Court 

No. 199,309 

To all persons interested in the 
estate of STEPHEN L. CONROY late 
of Quincy in said County, deceased. 

A petition has been presented to 
said Court praying that MYRTLE 
CONROY of Quincy in the County 
•of Norfolk be appointed 
administratrix of said estate without 
giving a surety on her bond. 

If you desire to object thereto you 
or your attorney should file a written 
appearance in said Court at Dedham 
before ten o'clock in the forenoon on 
the sixteenth day of January 1974, 
the return day of this citation. 

Witness, ROBERT M. FORD, 
Esquire, First Judge of said Court, 
this thirteenth day of December 
1973. 

PAUL C GAY, 
Register. 
12/20-27 1/3/74 

COMMONWEALTH OF 

MASSACHUSETTS 

Norfolk, ss. Probate Court 

No. 199,355 

To all persons interested in the 
estate of JAMES H. ROGERS late of 
Quincy in said County, deceased. 
And to the Attorney General of said 
Commonwealth, if required. 

A petition has been presented to 
said Court for probate of a certain 
instrument purporting to be the last 
will of said deceased by FRANCIS A. 
ROGERS of Weymouth in the 
County of Norfolk praying that he be 
appointed executor thereof without 
giving a surety on his bond. 

If you desire to object thereto you 
or your attorney should file a written 
appearance in said Court at Dedham 
before ten o'clock in the forenoon on 
the sixteenth day of January 1974, 
the return day of this citation. 

Witness, ROBERT M. FORD, 

Esquire, First Judge of said Court, 

this eleventh day of December 1973. 

PAUL C. GAY, 

Register. 

12/27 1/3-10/74 



Thursday, January 3, 1974 Quincy Sun Page 23 




LEGAL NOTICES 

COMMONWEALTH OF 

MASSACHUSETTS 

Norfolk, ss. Probate Court 

No. 199,252 

To all persons interested in the 
estate of MARY SHANGOLD 
GROSSMAN also known as MARY 
S. GROSSMAN late of Quincy in said 
County, deceased. And to the 
Attorney General of said 
Commonwealth, if required. 

A petition, as amended, has been 
presented to said Court for probate 
of a certain instrument purporting to 
be the last will of said deceased by 
BEATRICE PEMSLER of Yonkers in 
the State of New York praying that 
she be appointed executrix thereof 
without giving a surety on her bond. 

If you desire to object thereto you 
or your attorney should file a written 
appearance in said Court at Dedham 
before ten o'clock in the forenoon on 
the sixteenth day of January 1974, 
the return day of this citation. 

Witness, ROBERT M. FORD, 

Esquire, First Judge of said Court, 

this tenth day of December 1973. 

PAUL C. GAY, 

Register 
12/20-27 1/3/74 

COMMONWEALTH OF 

MASSACHUSETTS 

Norfolk, ss. Probate Court 

No. 199,375 

To all persons interested in the 
estate of ISABELLA M. McLEAN 
late of .Quincy in said County, 
deceased. And to the Attorney 
General of said Commonwealth, if 
required. 

A petition has been presented to 
said Court for probate of a certain 
instrument purporting to be the last 
will of said deceased by DAVID B. 
McLEAN of Quincy in the County of 
Norfolk and ROBERT J. McLEAN of 
Braintree in the County of Norfolk 
praying that they be appointed 
executors thereof without giving a 
surety on their bonds. 

If you desire to object thereto you 
or your attorney should file a written 
appearance in said Court at Dedham 
before ten o'clock in the forenoon on 
the sixteenth day of January 1974, 
the return day of this citation. 

Witness, ROBERT M. FORD, 

Esquire, First Judge of said Court, 

this eleventh day of December 1973. 

PAUL C. GAY, 

Register. 

12/20-27 1/3/74 

COMMONWEALTH OF 

MASSACHUSETTS 

Norfolk, ss. Probate Court 

No. 199,437 

To ANNIE M. RIZZI of Quincy in 
the County of Norfolk, and to her 
heirs apparent or presumptive and to 
the Massachusetts Department of 
Mental Health. And to the Attorney 
General of said Commonwealth, if 
required. 

A petition has been presented to 
said Court alleging that said ANNIE 
M. RIZZI has become incapacitated 
by reason of advanced age, mental 
weakness, to properly care for her 
property and praying that NORMAN 
J. RIZZI of San Francisco in the 
State of California, or some other 
suitable person, be appointed 
conservator of her property. 

If you desire to object thereto, 
you or your attorney should file a 
written appearance in said Court at 
Dedham before ten o'clock in the 
forenoon on the thirtieth day of 
January 1974, the return day of this 
citation. 

Witness, ROBERT M. FORD, 
Esquire, First Judge of said Court, 
this twenty-first day of December 
1973. 

PAUL C. GAY, 
Register. 
1/3-10-17/74 



Save Gas and Money 
shop locally. 



HELP WANTED 



HELP WANTED 



SERVICES OFFERED 



SERVICES OFFERED 



CIRCULATION 
DRIVER 

Part-time Driver, Male or Female wanted to Deliver 
Quincy Sun to newsstands and newsboys Wednesday 
afternoons. Must have car. 



Call 
471-3100 



SERVICES 



CHILD CARE 

Rent-A-Parent Young married 
South Shore couples will care 
for your home and children 
while you enjoy your 
vacation. Interviews and 
References available. 

UNIVERSITY 

HOME SERVICES 

961-1616 RANDOLPH 
449-3590 NEEDHAM 



SERVICES 



GENERAL CARPENTRY 

Remodelling, Repairs, Additions. 
Bathrooms, Kitchens, Playrooms, 
etc. Call evenings. 

John D. Mignosa 
479-4865 2 /7 



FOR SALE 



MATTRESSES 



CARPENTRY 



Licensed builder, 26 years 
experience. Repairs, remodeling & 
additions. No job too small, hree 
estimates. Charles J. Ross, 

479-3755. 



WEAVER 
FOREIGN AUTO 

Service Certified Jaguar-Rolls 
technician. 26 yrs experience 
servicing all foreign cars. 
Quality work guaranteed 

843-8663 T - F - 



KEYS MADE 

Locksmith on Duty 

GRANITE CITY 

HARDWARE 

1617 Hancock St., Quincy 

479-5454 



MATTRESSES - -Immediate 
Delivery. Can you use 
exceptionally good buys on 
king, queen, full or twin 
mattresses, beds, trundles, 
bunks at discount. Brand 
names, Sealy, Eclipse, 
Slumberland, Englander, etc. 
Bedding has been our only 
business for over 20 years. 
Open eves., Siesta Sleep 
Shops, 221 Parkingway, 
Quincy, Corner of School 
Street. 

T.F. 



BOATS 



Clearance prices on all boats. 
Storage & reconditioning of 
motors for winter. President 
Marine, 666 Southern Artery, 
Quincy. 773-5058. T.F. 



FUEL OIL 



T.F. 



INSURANCE 



HOME OWNERS RATES ARE 
LOWER: If you have a .basic 
Homeowner's policy for $20,000 
and are paying more than $62.00 
a year, call 2824412 at once. 
Rutstein Insurance Agency. 



DOYLE & LONG 
FUEL OIL 

& 
HEATING EQUIPMENT 
624 Hancock St., Wollaston 
Tel: 472-4800 T.F. 



HALL FOR RENT 

North Quincy K. of C. Building, 5 
Hollis Ave. For information 
please call, 

328-5552-328-0087- 
328-9822 

T.F. 



FLOORS & WALLS 

Linoleum, ceramic tile, formica, sold & installed. Hardwood 
floors laid, sanded and finished. Many specials in our store. 
Wall Tile, carpeting, Armstrong floor coverings of all types 
at reduced prices. 

ART FLOOR COMPANY 

1 1 5 Sagamore St., North Quincy 

328-6970 

Open 8:00 -5:00 Daily 
Closed Sat. 




SOUTH SHQRI roiroiM.imi«i 

FACTORY SERVICE 



FOR 



RCA-M'OTROLA-SYLVANIA ZENITH 
ADMIRAL-MASTERWORKS 



Call 479-1350 
i 



Newsboys 

(And, Newsgirls, Too) 

WANTED 




1601 Hancock St. 

471-3100 



i 
i 

i 



wt/, __. j 



c t 



Index for W » tul jo. j 

MAIL TO: QUINCY SUN 1601 Hancock St., Quincy 02169 

C laSSIT led WANT ADS PAYABLE IN ADVANCE...cash must accompany order | 

Enclosed is lor the following ad to run____t imes 

A Services 

B For Sale mpY . I 

C Autos 

D BOatS m—-mmmmm—mmmm.^^m.mmmi^-mmm—m~m.—^——-mmm—Bm—mmmm-mmm—m.m-mmmmmm~ 

E For Rent 

F Help Wanted ^mmmmmmmmmmmmm—mmmmmmmmmm—mmmmmmmmmmmm—mmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmm——^ 

G Pets, Livestock 

H Lost and Found w ™""" -"-—■^ ^— — — - mmmmmm—mmmmm — — — — — — r™— ^_ 

I Real Estate for Sale K*tes: $2.25 for one week, up to 20 words, 5^ each additional word. 

J Real Estate Wanted Contract rate: $2.00 per week, up to 20 words for three or more insertions of 

K .Miscellaneous the same ad. 

h* J K2 Want6d No refund will be made at this contract rate in the event of 

M .Antiques „ _, 

N Coin, and Stamps cancellation. 

O Rest Homes Deadline: Friday 5 P.M. for the following weeks publication. 

Instruction Please include your phone number in ad. 

— — —————————————— — — — —.——.———.——.—. — —-.«»-_ — - — — — — -.__ w—4^ 



) 



Page 24 Quincy Sun Thursday, January 3, 1974 



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SAL ES 1570 HANCOCK STREET. QUINCY. 479-1350. SERVICE 




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Thomas Crane Public Library 
Box 379 

Quincy, Mass. 02169 Would Soften Economic Blow In Quincy Area 

Kennedy Sees More Shipyard Work 
A Beneficial Impact Of Energy Crisis 



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Thursday, J 


inuary 


10, 1974 














INAUGURAL SCENE - Mayor Walter J. Hannon delivers his second inaugural address to throng in the 
gymnasium of Quincy Vocational Technical School. Seated behind him are three former Quincy mayors 
[left to right] Amelio Delia Chiesa, Thomas Burgin and James R. Mclntyre. 

[Quincy Sun Photo by Laban Whittaker] 

Asks Citizens' Help 

Hannon Cites Need For More 
State Street South Projects 



Mayor Walter J. Hannon 
began his second term Monday 
with a ringing call for the help of 
all citizens to make Quincy 
economically sound and improve 
the quality of its life. 

He listed as goals of his new 
administration: 

• An attack on the 
unemployment problem. 

• More projects like Kemper 
Insurance and State Street South 
to add to the tax base and 
employ local people. 

• Development of downtown 
Quincy into "one of the most 
attractive and inviting shopping 
centers" on the South Shore. 

• Federal funds to carry out 
neighborhood improvement 
programs. 

And he appealed to the 
citizens of Quincy to play a 
greater role in the improvement 
of their city. 

The ceremonies were 
marked~or marred-by an 
apparent historic "first": one of 
the incoming councillors-James 
A. Sheets of Ward 4-declined to 
take his oath. 

Sheets asked that his 
installation be temporarily 
delayed pending a threatened 
taxpayers' suit. Ten taxpayers 
allege Sheets would be in 
conflict if he serves as a city 
councillor while a professor at 
the city-operated Quincy Junior 
College. 



Arthur H. Tobin was 
re-elected council president for a 
precedent-setting fifth time. The 
vote was 7-0 with Councillor 
Joseph LaRaia abstaining and 
Sheets unable to vote. 

Mrs. Josephine Carnali was 
re-elected to her fifth one-year 
term as clerk of council 
committees. 

New School Committeeman 
John J. Sullivan was sworn in by 
Mayor Hannon in an unusual 
move during the inauguration 
ceremonies. Ordinarily, Sullivan 
would have takenhis oath at the 
school committee's 
organizational meeting that 
night. 

Nearly 1,000 persons 
including three former 
mayors-Thomas S. Burgin, 
Amelio Delia Chiesa, James R. 
Mclntyre-attended the inaugural 
ceremonies. There were a large 
number of students present. 

The Library Services 
Department of the school 
system filmed the proceedings 
on videotape for showing at a 
later date and to be placed in the 
school department's historical 
file. 

"You and I may not be able 
to control what happens in the 
rest of the country," he said in 
his inaugural address in the 
Quincy Voc-Tech gym, "but we 
can control our city. 

"You have the responsibility 



of deciding its direction." 

But progressive citizens, he 
said, too often abdicate that 
responsibility by choosing the 
Monday night football game 
over a. City Council meeting and 
the Thursday night movie over a 
public hearing. 

"Every time there's a meeting 
or a hearing at City Hall, I can 
tell you exactly who will be 
there," he said. "All too often, 
it's those who oppose any degree 
of progress. 

"We are not against 
constructive criticism and 
reasonable thought, but far too 
often we only hear from the 
complainers. 

"We can't continueto improve 
our city with only the so-called 
'wise counsel' of the 
obstructionists." 

Full citizen participation is 
particularly important right now 
because, he said, "in all honesty, 
we have some problems. 

"If we see unemployment as a 
problem, then we must do 
something about it. 

"We need more of the 
Kemper and State Street 
projects that add to our tax base 
and employ our people. 

"The future of General 
Dynamics is improving every day 
with the largest ship contracts in 
the world. 

"Witlj 5,000 people employed 
ICont'donPageS) 



By HENRY BOSWORTH and 
TOM HENSHAW 

Sen. Kdward M. Kennedy says he has high hopes for the 
future of the General Dynamics Quincy shipyard and feels 
that its resurgence will soften the impact on the South 
Shore of any future economic recession. 

"I'm more hopeful about the future of the yard than 
I've been in a number of years." said Kennedy. Tuesday 
during a visit to the offices of The Quincy Sun. 

"I feel this country is going to be involved in a major 
shipbuilding program to meet the problems of the energy 
crisis. 



"We see it already in the 
contracts for the liquified 
natural gas tankers which are a 
tribute to the workmanship and 
management of the yard. 

"It will be necessary to build 
a very si/able quantity of those 
because natural gas will be one 
of the key sources of energy in 
the tut ure. 

"Also the movement of coal 
and other energy sources will 
require a very significant 
increase in the building of ships. 

"True, these particular LNGs 
are being built to transport 
Algerian gas and Algeria is an 
Arab country that is strongly 
committed to the Arab cause. 

"But even so. the Algerians 
have shown a great interest in 
the shipment of natural gas. 

"I'm very hopeful that the 
Middle fast conference will 
work out a satisfactory solution 
to the Middle East question and 

Says Sheets: 



we'll begin to see some freeing 
up of oil resources. 

"1 think even with the freeing 
up of oil and natural gas we'll 
still have important energy 
problems over a period of time. 

"We are going to need to ship, 
not only oil and natural gas, but 
coal as well. 

"This country lias about 750 
years of coal resources, There's 
going to be a demand for that in 
Europe and other parts of the 
world. 

"Movement over water is one 
of the most efficient ways to 
transport goods. I think there'll 
be a revival of the maritime 
fleet. 

"I believe there are a lot of 
countries around the world who 
will want ships, and many of 
those ships can be built in the 
Quincy yard." 

Kennedy said expansion of 
| Cont'd on Page 3| 



They Have To Live 
With Their Motives' 



Just when it appears that the 
great Quincy election of 1973 is 
finally over, someone new jumps 
into the ring firing writs from 
both hips. 

The new City Council was 
sworn into office Monday - all 
except James A. Sheets, 
councillor-elect from Ward 4. 

Sheets, who ousted Councillor 
Albert R. Barilaro in the 
December election, just sat on 
the podium and watched while 
the other eight Councillors took 
their oaths of office. 

He. explained that the threat 
of a conflict of interest suit from 
a mystery band of 10 taxpayers 
forced him out of the ceremony. 

The taxpayers, fronted by 
North Quincy Attorney Frank 
W. Cormack, question the 
legality of his serving on the City 
Council for $3,000 while 
drawing a salary as head of the 
government department at 
Quincy Junior College. 

City Clerk John Gillis who 
administered the oath to the 
councillors said: "I'm sorry this 



has happened. If I were Jim 
Sheets, 1 would have raised my 
hand. (To take his oath] . 

"Our counsel. Kevin Keating 
of Boston, feels that if Jim were 
sworn in, his pay as a teacher 
could be attached and his job 
endangered," said Ron Kaufman 
of Quincy, Sheets' spokesman. 
Instead of taking the oath, 
Sheets delivered a statement to 
the near 1000 persons, including 
some 200 students, who 
attended the inaugural 
ceremonies in the Quincy 
Vocational Technical gym: 

"Less than a week ago," he 
said, "I was made aware that a 
group of 10 anonymous people 
was challenging my right to serve 
on the Council so long as I 
continued to teach the young 
people at Quincy Junior College. 

"Had this challenge been 
issued three months ago, the 
problem would have been 
resolved and no shadow cast 
over this memorable occasion. 
[Cont'd on Page 17| 



Quinn Oversight Chairman; 
Cemetery Probe To Continue 



The City Council's probe of 
the Cemetery Department is 
going to continue. 

Among the first appointments 
by Council President Arthur H. 
Tobin Monday was that of 
Councillor John J. Quinn as 
chairman of the oversight 
committee, which has been 
conducting the investigation. 

Others named by Tobin to the 
committee are: Councillors 
Dennis E. Harrington, vice 
chairman; Clifford H. Marshall, 
Joseph J. LaRaia and Warren A. 
Powers. 



The outgoing chairman of the 
oversight committee, former 
Councillor Edward Graham, said 
Friday that his investigation is 
complete since "we've heard 
from all the witnesses who were 
willing to come forward." 

The probe was begun Dec. 27 
at the insistence of Councillor 
LaRaia after the resignation of 
Cemetery Superintendent 
Anthony Famigletti, who was 
charged with burying two 
relatives in graves he did not 
purchase. 

(Cont'd on Page 17] 



Page 2 Quincy Sun Thursday, January 10, 1974 

Over 200 In Historic Tribute 



Harry Pavan: 'Man Of Dedication, Honor, Integrity 



• • • 



4 




CITY COUNCIL CHAMBER took on the appearance of a courtroom Sunday as 
black-robed judges, city officials, lawyers, friends and associates paid tribute to late 
City Solicitor Harry Pavan. Judge Robert Prince [center background] presiding justice 
of Quincy District Court, presides over ceremonies. Standing at center right is Quincy 
Court Clerk Dennis F. Ryan who was master of ceremonies. 

[Quincy Sun Photo by Laban H. Whittaker] 



By HENRY BOSWORTH 

A man of dedication . . . 
honor . . . integrity . . . courage . 
. . humility ... a man named 
Harry Pavan. 

That was how men who knew 
him best fondly remembered 
him during special memorial 
ceremonies at the City Council 
Chamber Sunday, which, if he 
had lived, would have been his 
63rd birthday. 

Ha rry --as he was 
affectionately known to just 
about every one of the 200 or so 
persons from all faiths and walks 
of life who attended-had served 
seven years as city solicitor 
during Quincy's "great growth" 
periods. He died Nov. 2, 1972, 
after a long illness. 

The council chamber, where 
he frequently stood to render a 
legal decision-sometimes under 
fire-took on the appearance of a 
courtroom for the rare tribute, 
the first ever to a city solicitor in 
Quincy's history. 



Fourteen black-robed judges, 
lawyers, city and state officials, 
and just plain friends-some of 
them not so well known--were 
on hand to remember Harry, and 
witness the unveiling of a 
handsome bronze plucque in his 
memory. 

Each had his or her own 
special remembrance of him. But 
each, to himself, seconded the 
words of praise from those 
selected to speak. 

Superior Court Judge Henry 
H. Chmielinski Jr., a close 
personal friend, and keynote 
speaker said: 

"In a sense we are paying 
tribute to an ideal rather than a 
man," noting that "Harry 
remained a man of virtues" in a 
day when virtues, values and 
qualities are scorned. 

"Harry was the type of a man 
who had no enemies and that is 
unusual. Everyone has someone 
who doesn't like him. But I have 
yet to meet a soul who didn't 



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like Harry. 

"He was not a headline 
hunter. He did not seek glory. 

"He was a devoted husband 
and father-a fine member of the 
bar. He epitomized the virtues of 
dedication, honor and integrity. 

"His word was his bond-he 
was a man of his word. If he told 
you something, it was so." 

Former Mayor James R. 
Mcintyre who appointed Mr. 
Pavan solicitor in 1966 recalled 
he served during a great growth 
period in Quincy's history 
including the coming of the 
MBTA and its many legal 
problems involving landtakings 
and other matters. 

There were fewer lawsuits 
because of him, Mcintyre said. 
And during the turbulent 
mid-60's, he credited his 
compassion with helping to keep 
riots away from Quincy. 

"Harry Pavan had a significant 
positive affect on me while I was 
mayor," Mcintyre said. "He had 
great love and compassion for 
his fellow citizen. 

Mcintyre urged today's public 
officials "to keep this in mind 
and face problems the same 
way." 

Mayor Walter J. Hannon, 
noting that Mr. Pavan died on 
the anniversary of his own 
father's death, said: "I looked 
upon him as more a father than 
a city solicitor. He gave me 



PRINCIPALS IN CEREMONIES honoring late City Solicitor Harry Pavan in City Hali 
Council Chamber Sunday included, from left, former Mayor James R. Mcintyre, 
Mayor Walter J. Hannon, Mr. Pavan's daughter. Dr. Deborah Langston, 
Senator-Council President Arthur H. Tobin and Superior Court Judge Henry H. 
Chmielinski Jr., keynote speaker. They are shown in front of memorial placque 
unveiled by Dr. Langston and Senator Tobin. 

[Quincy Sun Photo by Laban H. Whittaker] 



sound advice. It was not difficult 
to re-appoint him." 

City Solicitor Richard J. 
McCormick and former assistant 
Solicitors Stephen T. Keefe and 
John W. Sharry-all of whom 
served with Mr. Pavan, had 
special tributes for him. 
McCormick remembered him as 
"a man of great patience and 
consideration." To Keefe, he 
was, "A man of honor, humility, 
humor." And to Sharry, "In 
every sense of the word a 
gentleman and a man of 
courage." 

Sharry noted that although 
Mr. Pavan was in pain and tired 
during his long illness, he never 
complained and always attended 
the council meetings. 

Quincy District Court Clerk 
Dennis F. Ryan who served as 
master of ceremonies, noted that 
"Harry Pavan shared of himself 
and of his legal talent with the 
people of Quincy." 

He singled out 
Senator-Council President 
Arthur H. Tobin, Mr. Pavan's 
law associate; Miss Violet Pace 
and Mrs. Muriel Chandler, his 
city and private secretaries, for 
bringing about the tribute. 

Dr. Deborah Langston, Mr. 
Pavan's daughter, and Senator 
Tobin unveiled a bronze 
memorial placque with this 
inscription: 

"A brilliant lawyer and friend 




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to all who knew him. His 
common sense, compassion and 
legal scholarship guided and 
enriched the city he loved." 

Dr. Langston thanked all who 
had helped make the tribute 
possible. And she remembered 
her father like this: 

"No matter how frustrating or 
vexing things became for him, I 
never saw him angry." 

Judge Robert S. Prince, 
presiding justice of Quincy 
District Court, presided over the 
ceremonies. Other judges 
participating were: 

James A. Mulhall and 
Gertrude R. Halloran, retired 
justices of Quincy District 
Court; Alvin C. Tamkin, 
presiding justice Hingham 
District Court; Alfred L. 
Podolski, chief justice and 
Robert M. Ford, justice Norfolk 
Probate Court; James R. 
Law ton, presiding justice 
Plymouth Probate Court; 
Superior Court Justices John J. 
McNaught and James Lynch. 

Joseph F. Feeney, South 
Boston District Court; Bernard 
Cohen, and George N. Hurd Jr.. 
Brockton District Court and 
Lewis T. Whitman, special 
justice Quincy District Court. 

City and state officials present 
included City Clerk John M. 
Gillis, Rep. William Delahunt, 
Rep. Thomas Brownell, 
Councillor-Rep. Clifford 
Marshall, Councillors John J. 
Quinn, James Lydon, Dennis 
Harrington, Fire Chief Edward 
Barry, and Richard J. Koch, 
executive secretary Quincy 
Park-Recreation Board. 

Rabbi David Jacobs of 
Temple Beth El likened Mr. 
Pavan's life to a tree that bears 
good fruit. Rabbi Jacob Ma nn t° f 
Beth Israel Synagogue said: 

"Harry Pavan worked hard. 
He came up the hard way. He 
did honor to his people, his faith 
and his country. 

'.. And gesturing around the 
council chamber, he added: "He 
loved this place and he came 
back. He is here to stay." 



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Delivery 

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Thursday .January 10, 1974 Quincy $un Page 3 



Kennedy Sees More 
Shipyard Work Here 



(Cont'd from Page 1 1 

activities at the yard will boost 
the economic picture on the 
whole South Shore. 

"Unfortunately," he said, "we 
are one of the states with the 
highest unemployment rate in 
the country, 6.9 per cent. 

"The best current estimates, 
based on the energy crisis, is that 
this can go up to 8 per cent or 
higher. 

"This will have a serious 
adverse impact on every phase of 
the economy all over the state. 

"But, with the expansion of 
shipyard activities, the impact 
on the South Shore will be 
somewhat diminished." 

On other subjects in a wide 
ranging conversation with the 
Quincy Sun, Kennedy said: 

* "1 have no plans to run for 
the presidency at this time. Of 
course, I'm aware that there is 
speculation about it. I realize 
that sometime before the end of 
1975 I will have to make my 
plans known to the people of 
this state. I will do so then." 

* "I think there is a good 
opportunity for the Democratic 
Party in 1976. I don't think the 
mere fact of Watergate 
necessarily means there will be a 
sweep toward Democrats but if 
we are able to come up with an 
effective candidate and program 
the American people are willing 
to consider an alternative." 

* "Teddy [his son who lost a 
leg to cancer] is making some 
progress. He returned to school 
yesterday. I'm sure that the 
prayers and good wishes of the 
people of the South Shore and 
Massachusetts . had a positive 
impact. h 

"He got hotkey sticks from 



Bobby Orr, a football from the 
Patriots, a baseball from the Red 
Sox, a basketball from the 
Celtics. In fact . he's so well 
outfitted that he said to me the 
other day: 

" i know I'm going to have to 
get back to playing sports -- but 
do I have to play them all?' " 

Kennedy was escorted in his 
Quincy area tour by Richard J. 
Koch, executive secretary of the 
Quincy Park-Recreation Board 
who headed Jorjn F. Kennedy's 
senatorial and Presidential 
campaign in Quincy. 

Capt. Paul Nestor of the 
Quincy Police Department was 
in charge of security during 
Kennedy's Quincy tour. 

Earlier, the Senator spoke at a 
luncheon meeting of the South 
Shore Chamber of Commerce in 
Randolph. 

He also made a number of 
coffee hour stops in the Quincy 
area. 

He was asked if this might be 
the kickoff to a Presidential 
campaign but he laughed and 
said that he was merely visiting 
the area to meet and talk with 
the people. 

During his visit at The Quincy 
Sun he was twice asked about a 
Presidential run but in both 
instances said that "at this time" 
he had no such plans. But he did 
not rule himself out as a 
candidate. 

He declined to name others he 
thought would be strong 
candidates. 

"I can think of a few," he 
said. "But I'm not going to name 
them." 

During his trip to The Sun, he 
was accompanied by his nephew. 
Joseph Kennedy, son of the late 
Senator, Ro.hertiF. Kennedy/ 




SUN VISIT - Senator Edward M. Kennedy listens intently as reporter Tom Henshaw [left] poses 
question during visit Tuesday to Quincy Sun office. In center is Publisher Henry Bosworth who teamed 
on the interview with Henshaw. 

[Quincy Sun Photo by Laban H. Whittaker] 

Sweeny Elected School Committee Vice-Chairman 






le 



'•• 




Charles T. Sweeny, veteran 
member of the Quincy School 
Committee, was elected that 
board's chairman by a 4-3 vote 
Monday night. 

Sweeny, now in his fifth term 
as a member of the board, edged 
Frank Anselmo in the secret 
balloting at the organizational 
meeting. The latter is starting his 
fourth term. 

Although the balloting was 
secret reliable sources informed 
The Quincy Sun that the vote 
lineup was this: 

Sweeny was supported by 
■Mayor; Walter J. Hannonwho : by 



• ■••• 



virtue of office is chairman; 
Harold Davis, John J. Sullivan 
and received his own vote. 

Voting for Anselmo were 
Daniel Raymondi, Frank 



McCauley and Anselmo. 

Sweeny previously served as 
vice-chairman in 1964 and 1965. 
He was first elected to the board 
in 1955. 




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Page 4 Quincy Sun Thursday, January 10, 1974 

• Editorial 

The Cemetery Probe And 
The District Attorney 

We don't usually go around picking on fellow newsmen or other 
newspapers but we just cannot let this one go by without comment. 
We refer to a recent article in The Boston Globe about the Quincy 
cemetery department matter still under investigation. 

Columnist Dave Farrell, a pretty savvy newsman and a good 
writer, for some reason or other seems to take special delight in 
zinging Dist. Atty. George Burke. 

In this particular column he starts it all off by stating Mr. Burke's 
"apparent disinterest in the Quincy cemetery department is worthy 
of scrutiny." 

He then notes in contrast, that Mr. Burke is •'quick to call a 
self-serving press conference whenever trouble erupts at Walpolc 
State Prison". 

The w;iy Mr. Farrell tells it, the district attorney, to put it 
politely, is shirking his duty and all that kind of stuff for political 
reasons as far as the cemetery department case is concerned. 

But he seems to overlook one major point that even a green cub 
police reporter knows. And that is that a district attorney doesn't go 
butting into everybody else's business. He steps in at the appropriate 
time and usually upon request by a police department 
or municipal official. 

If you follow Mr. Farrcll's reasoning, then Mr. Burke should be 
involved in the investigation of every housebreak, traffic accident, 
assault, theft, etc., in every community in Norfolk County. 

In the case of the Quincy cemetery department, one investigation 
has been made and another is still being carried out by the Quincy 
police department. No one has asked Mr. Burke to step in. 

The director of the Bureau of Accounts, according to Mr. Farrell. 
"is expediting a report on the results of his audit". But the director, 
at this writing had not referred any thing to the district attorney or 
requested him to move in. 

The City Council's Oversight Committee has just about wrapped 
up its public probe with this observation from Chairman bdward 
Graham: "We have heard from all the witnesses who were willing to 
come forward." He said the committee will submit a summary 
report . 

And, at this point, the City Council has made no request to Mr. 
Burke to move in to investigate or prosecute. 

The case itself was discovered by Quincy City Auditor Alexander 
Smith and brought to Mayor Walter Hannon's attention. He 
immediately launched a police investigation. 

And, just for the record, Mr. Burke did discuss the case with 
Mayor Hannon three or four weeks ago. He obviously is watching it. 

As far as the Walpole State Prison is concerncd--ves~Mr. Burke has 
called press conferences about incidents there. But it's usually after a 
dead body turns up there or someone has found a hidden arsenal, or 
a riot is underway or someone tries to bum the place down. 

We do not know what the cemetery department investigation will 
produce before it is all over. But as developments occur, there 
doesn't seem to be any attempted coverup. 

We don't think Mr. Burke deserves the raking over he got in The 
Globe. He's been a good district attorney --who can be both fair and 
tough. And he has said "no" to even friends when he felt he had to. 

Postage Rate Hikes 
Delayed Until March 

Postage rate hikes scheduled 
to go into effect Jan. 5, have 
been postponed until March 2, 
the U.S. Postal Service 
announces. 

The new rates will raise first 
class postage from 8 to 10 cents 

LANSKY'S LOOK 



and airmail from 11 to 1 3 cents. 
There will be increases in other 
classes of mail. The delayed 
increases are in compliance with 
a Cost of Living Council 
decision. 





SENATOR ARTHUR TOBIN acknowledges his election to a precedent setting fifth term as Quincy city 
council president during Monday's inaugural ceremonies. Seated are Mrs. Josephine Carnali, reelected 
clerk of committees. City Clerk John Gillis, City Auditor Alexander Smith and [left rear] former Mayor 
Amelio Delia Chiesa. 

[Quincy Sun Photo by Laban Whittaker] 

Tobin Re-elected To Historic 5th Term 



Arthur H. Tobin wrote 
another paragraph in Quincy's 
history book Monday when he 
was elected to an unprecedented 
fifth consecutive term as City 
Council president. 

No other man has been 
elected to more than two 
one-year terms as council 
president in Quincy's history. 

Tobin was given seven of his 
colleague's nine votes with 
Councillor Joseph J. LaRaia 
abstaining and new Ward 4 



councillor James A. Sheets 
unable to vote after declining to 
take his oath pending a 
threatened taxpayer's suit. 

The taxpayers, still 
unidentified, raise the point that 
Sheets, a professor at the city 
operated Quincy Junior College 
would be in conflict if he also 
served the city as a councillor. 

Councillor John J. Quinn, the 
only man who could possibly 
have wrested the gavel from 
Tobin, nominated him instead 



and paid tribute to Tobin's 
leadership qualities." 

LaRaia, who earlier was a 
candidate for ' the council 
p re sidency , responded . . : *i 
abstain" when City Clerk John 
M. Gillis polled the councillors^ 

Tobin's nomination was. 
seconded by new Ward 1 
Councillor Leo J. Kelly. 

After LaRaia 'abstained from 
voting, he stood up, tapped 
Tobin on the shoulder and 
shook hands with him. 



•Youth Speaks Out 

•America, the land of equal opportunity - everybody has an equal 
opportunity to run out of oil, meat, paper and gasoline. 

•Possible Classified Ad: A brand new Cadillac with only 100 miles 
on it for SI ,000. It was formerly owned by the man who could only 
afford to drive back and forth to the gas station. 

• Daylight Savings Time is supposed to conserve energy. We hope its 
not another administration trick to "keep us in the dark". 

• Usually around this time of year everybody writes last years date 
on checks and papers, but not this time because we're so happy 
1973 is over. 

• Comet Kahoutek hasn't shone as brightly - either its conserving 
energy or its out of gas. 

•A loaded revolver was found hidden in the wall plaster at Walpole 
State Prison. We wonder who the interior decorator is. 

Quincy High School Journalism Class 

• Historic Moments 




PANCHO VILLA 

Mexican revolutionary 
leader Pancho Villa killed 18 
American mining engineers 
at Santa Ysabel, Mexico, on 
Jan. 10, 1916. 

EARHART SOLOS 
On Jan. 12, 1935, Amelia 
Earhart became the first 
woman to fly solo from Ha- 
waii to California. 

HEALTH HAZARD 

On Jan. 11, 1964, Luther L. 
Terry, U.S. surgeon general, 
released a report that de- 
scribed cigarette smoking as 
a "health hazard." 



LUZON INVASION 

American troops under 
Gen. of the Army Douglas 
Mac Arthur invaded Luzon, 
Philippine Islands, on Jan 9* 
1945. 



JOHN HANCOCK 

John Hancock, American 
Revolutionary leader, was 
born in Quincy, on Jan. 12, 1737. 



A Tribute 
To Councillor 
McLelland 

Editor, Quincy Sun; '•'•.' 

I think it most fitting and 
proper to express many thanks 
of a job well done as Councillor 
of Ward 3, Ted McLelland. . 

Here is a good family man 
who gave more of himself 
without expecting anything in 
return. His voice would echo, 
within the walls of the council, 
not loud in tone, but wisdom of 
his interest to serve his city to 
the best interests of all. 

From the many friends and 
voters of the City of Quincy 
Ted, "a job well done, and your 
record speaks for itself. Let the 
seasons pass by in the calm, and 
bring your tide back to the city 
as a wave in the ocean. 

. Bob McCarthy 
4 Morgan Rd, Quincy 




Published weekly on Thursday by 

The Quincy Sun Publishing Company 

1601 Hancock St., Quincy, Massachusetts 02169 

Publisher and Editor 

Henry W. Bosworth, Jr. 

Advertising Director 

John B. Powers 

10a 7 Per Copy - $3.50 Per Year - Out of State $4.50 Per Year 

Telephone: 471-3100 471-3101 471-3102 

Second-Class Postage Paid at Boston, Mass. 

MEMBER NEW ENGLAND PRESS ASSOCIATION 

The Quincy Sun assumes no financial responsibility for 

typographical errors in advertisements but will reprint that part of 

an advertisement in which the typographical error occurs. 



Thursday, January 10, 1974 Quincy Sun Page 5 



Sunbeams 



By HENRY BOSWORTH 

Quinn Launches 'Grass Roots 9 
Gubernatorial Campaign Here 

Atty. Gen. Robert Quinn was in Quincy the other night to launch 
a "grass roots" campaign for governor. 

He didn't officially say he was running for governor. "All I can 
say " said he, "is that I am not a candidate for re-election but expect 
to be a candidate for state office." 

But you can be sure as Westinghouse that he is a candidate. Look 
for him to make it official sometime in March. 

Quinn stopped off at the law office of Atty. Richard Barry in 
North Quincy who will be his Quincy campaign coordinator. He was 
greeted there by Richard Koch, executive, secretary Quincy 
Park-Recreation Board whose daughter, Linda, will be his North 
Quincy chairman. Dist. Atty. George ..Burke dropped in to say hello. 

After chatting with newsmcn--but half-heartedly ducking his 
candidacy-'Quin'n "met with" ward'ehairmeif aiYd "worRefs at Several 
Quincy homes. 

Ch^fles Shea, former city councillor and state representative, will 
be Quinn's Ward I chairman. The ward meeting was held at the 
Moreland Rd. home of Rep. Thomas Brownell. 

Another meeting was at the home of Robert Ccrasolia.of Whiton 
Ave.. Quincy Point-Ward 2 chairman. 

Joseph Gildea and former School Committee Vice-chairman Paul 
Keljy ,arefWard 3- and Ward j chairmen inspect iyely! They and 
woiier? of those two wards met *dtthe home of* Dr. Donald 
MacLeod of Dixwell Ave. ..„..-, 

Other meetings were held at the homes of Richard Mmiissey, Jr.. 
Buckingham Rd.. Ward 5 chairman; Miss Koch and 1 Atty. Gregory 
Galvin of Wedgewood Rd., Squantum area chairman. 

Reportedly up to 30 or more workers were at each home Waiting 
to meet- With Quinn and to start rolling up their sleeves to work for 
his electron as governor. 

.:.-■ *♦* 

QUINCES TWO CONTENDERS for Norfolk County sheriff may 
find themselves, with a surprise candidate to reckon with: incumbent 
Charles Hedges. 

Although; Hedges several months ago confided to' close friends 
that he would not seek re-election, word out of Dedhain now is that 
he appears to be changing his mind and might just make one more 

run. a fcjTi i 

County^ Commissioner Gtorge McDonald and CoJfcS&llor-RiJp.. ;• i 

Cliftortl': Marshall are" candidates now. John Brownell is thinking of 

it, but would not run against Hedges. , 

McDonald, Marshall and Hedges would make quite a battle. 

INCIDENTALLY, McDonald spikes rumors now circulating that 
he. writ how out of the ryJe and take an important appointment 
instead. 

'Tvedreard the rumors," he says. "But there's nothing to them. 
I'm definitely in the sheriff's race to stay. And you can quote. me." 

WELL, .YOU CAN bet who Nick Trifonc, Jr. will be rooting for in 
the Super. Bowl Jan. 13. Nick's dad, probation officer at Quincy , 
District Court and the Miami Dolphins' Nick Buoniconti went to 
Boston University together and have remained good friends. 

Young Nick who is 15, recently underwent surgery. Ron Van 
Dam of the Bargain Center was in Miami, met Buoniconti and 
mentioned that the youngster was in the hospital. 

Buoniconti sent him a get well message and followed it up with a 
special delivery package containing a set of earphones for radio or 

stereo. 

*** 
SPEAKING OF THE Super Bowl, at least four members of the 
Adam's Heights Men's Club, will be flying to the big game. All set to 
go are 'Ken 'Baldueci, 'former- 'Qfuincy High grid star; Harold Merril], 
Ed Vickery and Rav Marcucci. -j ' S * ** '■ >■ - 

ONE CONTENDER for the City Council- presidency reportedly 
lost any possibility when he asked a third party to help him line up 
two votes. It boomeranged. 

..YOU CAN HELP DEPT: The Quincy Detoxification Center's 
Faxon House needs used bathrobes, pajamas .and men's sport jackets 
for residents. If you have anything along that 'line you don't need, 
contact Frank Martinson at 472-1484; or 'Sabina Stenberg, 
472-9687. The clothing may be left at the center or at Sabina's 
Beauty Shop, 660 Hancock St., Wollaston. 

eaded up Mayor Hannon's inaugural 
committee, is expected to be named city Director of Tourism, 
succeeding Joseph Sandblom who resigned last week. The job pays 

$7,782. 

MOMENTS TO REMEMBER Dept: Arthur Tobin would have 
been unanimously re-elected council president Monday except for 
Councillor Joseph LaRaia. [James Sheets who didn't take his oath 
was unable to vote.] LaRaia abstained making the vote 7 in favor 
instead of 8. But then, in an apparent gesture to show there were 
really no hard feelings, LaRaia stood up and shook hands with 

Tobin. 

Councillor John Quinn, the only man who could have wrested the 
gavel away from Tobin, nominated him instead. Ward 1 Councillor 
Leo Kelly seconded the motion. 




MAYOR WALTER HANNON takes second-term oath from City Clerk John M. Gillis at Monday's 
inaugural ceremonies at Quincy Vocational Technical School gymnasium. 

[Quincy Sun Photo by Laban Whittaker] 




INAUGURAL BALL -- Mayor Walter J. Hannon, his wife, Patricia, Council President Arthur Tobin and 
his wife, Shirley, receive well wishes at Inaugural Ball Monday night. 

[Quincy Sun Photo by Laban H. Whittaker] 

Hannon Seeks Tax Revenue Projects 



[Cont'd from Page 1] ; 

at the shipyard, the payroll will 
pump millions' of dollars into 
Quincy's economy. 

"In the months ahead, 1 will 
seek ~out the . proper developers, 
the^best v type of Businesses for. 
our city. 

"Citizens groups, business and 
government must work with 
great zeal and dedication for the 
revitalization of our central 
business district. 

"This will provide job 
opportunities for the 
unemployed, as well as for our 
young people so that they live in 
Quincy as have their parents and 
grandparents. 

"We must transform our 
downtown into one of the most 
attractive and inviting shopping 
centers in the region. For 
Quincy is not just the gateway 
to the South Shore, it's the Hub. 

"In times like this, 
management, labor and 
government must work together 
in an atmosphere of optimism 
and cooperation. 

"With these three ingredients, 
we can successfully face our 
challenges." 

Quincy, he said, is becoming 
increasingly more attractive as a 
"bedroom community" for 



people who work in Boston. 

"But we must never let 
anyone forget that we are 
basically a city of 
neighborhoods," he warned. 

"Our neighborhoods are our 
strongest asset. 

"Because of this, we have 
spent millions of dollars in the 
improvement of private property 
in North Quincy, Wollaston and, 
most recently, Quincy Point. 

"We know now that this can 
be done with minimum 
inconvenienceand wholehearted 
acceptance by area residents. 

"But there are still areas of 
Quincy that need improvement 
and I will continue to seek 
federal funds to carry on these 
programs." 

Hannon said he feels that he 
has lived up to his first inaugural 
pledge of January, 1972, to 
bring economy to the city 
government, even though some 
of his cost-cutting moves might 
prove unpopular. 



"I have repeatedly said that 
the job of Mayor was one of 
decision-making," he said. 

"I have made decisions, 
painfully and politically unwise 
as they may have seemed r 

"But, I win^c^finUfe'fOhiake 
hard decisions in the next two 
years, because that's my jori." 



The invocation at • the 
inaugural ceremonies was given 
by Rev. Edward B. Flaherty, St. 
Ann's Church, Wollaston. A 
special prayer was given by Rev. 
John R. Graham of First Parish 
Church and benediction was by 
Rabbi Jacob Mann of Beth Israel 
Synagogue.. 

The Quincy High School 
Concert Choir, directed by' Gale 
Harrison, sang the "Star 
Spangled Banner" and "O, Clap 
Your Hands". The North Quincy 
High School band, directed by 
David Watson, played a number 
of selections including "Masque" 
and "God Bless America". 



Marie Hanlon Reappointed Notary 



Marie L. Hanlon, of 69 Centre 
St., Quincy has been 
reappointed a Notary Public, 
State Secretary John F. X. 
Davoren announces. 

Confirmation of the 



reappointed Notary was made at 
a meeting of the Executive 
Council following submission of 
the name by Governor Francis 
W. Sargent. The term will expire 
in seven years. 



Page 6 Quincy Sun Thursday, January 10, 1974 




ENJOYING the annual Freshman Mothers' Tea sponsored by the 
Archbishop Williams Guild are Nancy Moreschi, Mary Cleary and 
Lucille McAllister, all of Quincy. 

Diet Workshop Plans 
Free Open House Week 



The Quincy Diet Workshop 
announces it will hold a free 
Open House week starting 
Monday, Jan. 14 in all its classes 
at Bethany Congregational 
Church, Temple Adas Shalom, 
the Quincy YMCA and Atlantic 
Memorial Congregational 
Church, North Quincy. The 
theme will be "The Whole 
Family", a new approach to 
weight control. The public is 
welcome to attend without 
obligation. 

There is a need for the entire 
family to learn sensible eating 
habits based on sound nutrition, 
according to workshop officials. 
Therefore, the Diet Workshop 
has now trained its staff to not 
only help its group members, 
but every member of the family. 
[All members of the family need 



not attend class]. 

"The Whole Family Cook 
Book" will be offered at a 
nominal charge in all classes. It 
will incorporate recipes everyone 
will enjoy - young or old, thin 
or overweight. In addition, a free 
guide to family meal planning 
will be distributed to all in 
attendance during the week of 
Jan. 14. It will now be possible 
for the dieter to cook for the 
enjoyment of the whole family, 
and at. the same time help the 
children avoid future weight 
problems. 

Free low-calorie recipes are 
available upon request by 
sending a self-addressed, 
stamped envelope to Lea Allen, 
118 Canton St., Randolph, MA 
02368. More information may 
be obtained by calling 986-6160. 



Ward 2 Civic Association 
To Install Saturday 



Theodore Harrington will be 
installed as president of the 
Ward 2 Civic Association at 
ceremonies Saturday at 7:30 
p.m. at the Fore River 
Clubhouse. 

He succeeds Mrs. Phyllis 
Bagen, who moves onto the 
board of directors. 

Other officers for the new 
year will include: Thomas 
Williams, vice president; Mrs. 
Pamela Coressella, treasurer; 



Mrs. Mary Lyons, corresponding 
secretary; Mrs. Nina Mayo, 
recording secretary. 

The board of directors will 
include: Mrs. Bagen, Owen 
Eaton, Kenneth Wilson, Ted 
DeCristofaro, Angelo DiGravio, 
Joseph Ericson, Clifford 
Marshall. 

There will be a buffet and 
dancing to the music of Guy 
Olivere and his band. 



Bryan Auxiliary To Hold Las Vegas Night 



C4R 



MARTS 
JEWilERS 

1422 Hancock St.1^>*ff 
Quincy, Mast ^•■"^ 
773-2170 

• DIAMOND APPRAISING 

• ESTAT£ APPRAISING 

• GEMSTONE 

IDENTIFICATION 

• FREE CONSULTATION 

ROBERTS. FREEMAN 
CERTIFIED GEMOLQGIST 



The George F. Bryan VFW 
Ladies Auxiliary will sponsor a 
Las Vegas Night at the Post 
home, 24 Broad St., Saturday 
Jan. 19, from 8 p.m. to 
midnight. 

Tillie Delancy is the chairman. 



DERRINGER 

THE FLORIST 
Plants Arrangements llowers 

3»9 Haococh St. 7 73 0959 



■J! 



nir 





m 




1 




Marriage 
Intentions 



Laurent P. Frechette, 118 
Franklin Ave., Quincy, material 
handler; Margaret Rudolph, 26 
Wingate Road, East Weymouth, 
teletype operator. 

Stephen J. Walsh, 1 Whiton 
Ave., Qinricy, student; Judy A. 
Nazzaro, 68 Marine Road, South 
Boston, secretary. 

George J. Elder, 16 Bates 
Ave., Quincy, electrician; 
Michele Y. Delcourt, 83 Quincy 
St., Quincy, food handler. 

Woodward 

Students See 

Kohoutek 

The entire student body of 
Woodward School for Girls 
visited the Science Museum in 
Boston, last week, where they 
attended a showing of the 
Comet Kohoutek at the Hayden 
Planetarium and visited museum 
exhibits relating to their 
respective science class 
assignments. 

Mrs. Ruth Golden was in 
charge of arrangements and was 
assisted by other faculty 
members, Mrs. Henry Duggan, 
Miss Ruth Hurlbert and Mr. 
Lawrence Yerdon. Mrs. 
Alexandra Moriarty and Mrs. 
Edward Krause', mothers of 
Woodward students, also 
accompanied the group. 

Yesterday, all members of 
grades 7 through 1 1 attended a 
matinee performance of Romeo 
and Juliet presented by the 
Oxford and Cambridge 
(England) Shakespeare 
Company, at the Loeb Theater, 
Cambridge. Miss Ruth Hurlbert 
and Mr. Lawrence Yerdon of the 
English Department were in 
charge of this trip and were 
assisted by Mrs. Henry Duggan, 
Mrs. Ruth Golden, Mrs. Clifford 
Millard and Mrs. Kenneth 
Whiting, faculty members; and 
by Mrs. Martin Kelly, Mrs. 
Andrew Mantineo, Mrs. 
Alexandra Moriarty and Mrs. 
Uno O'Jennos, mothers of 
students. 

Day trips which provide 
curriculum enrichment are an 
integral part of the Woodward 
School program and continue 
despite current gas shortage. The 
MBTA is used in lieu of bus 
transportation. 




PHOTO COURTESY OF THOMAS CRANE PUBLIC LIBRARY 



...Wollaston or Squantum 
Yacht Club [which one is it?] 
looked like this? There were 
no seawalls, no docks and no 
boats in this Fall Scene along 
Wollaston Beach. 



Do you remember when your 
last property valuation took 
place? Do you know who your, 
insurance company is? Talk 
with us at Burgin-Platner. 

BURGIN 

PLATNER 

INS. 

1357 Hancock Street. 
Quincy, 472-3000 




ENGAGED - Mr. and Mrs. Victor Ricciardi of 596 Willard St., 
Quincy, announce the engagement of their daughter Lynne-Marie to 
Charles Henry MacKay. He is the son of Mr. and Mrs. Alexander 
James MacKay of 132 Rockland St., Houghs Neck. Miss Ricciardi is 
a graduate of Quincy High School and is attending Massasoit 
Community College School of Nursing. Mr. MacKay is a graduate of 
Quincy Vocational-Technicla High School and is employed by the 
Star Market Co., Auburndale as a meatcutter. A Jan. 12, 1975 
wedding is planned. 

[Blackwell Studio] 

Seniors Planning Spring 
Cruise To West Indies 



The 1000 Southern Artery 
Senior Citizens Center is 
planning a week's spring cruise 
to the West Indies March 30. 

To date, 32 residents have 
signed up. There are 48 more 
spaces available to anyone. 

Passengers for the cruise will 
leave for New York City from 
1000 Southern Artery March 30 



by chartered bus, and leave New 
York at 5 p.m. on the SS 
Rotterdam. During the one-week 
cruise the ship will stop at San 
Juan, Puerto Rico; Philipsburg, 
St. Maarten; and Charlotte 
Amalie, St. Thomas. 

Passengers will return to 
Quincy April 8. 



Paula Piraino Exhibit 



At Main 



Paula Lisa Piraino of 
Somerville is exhibiting her 
watercolors in the Thomas Crane 
Public Library, Main Hall, 
Quincy through January. 

Miss Piraino graduated from 
Massachusetts College of Art in 
1963. After teaching for a year 
in Braintree she studied in 
Florence, Italy. She has done 
portrait work in Hyannis, Cape 
Cod, in Wellesley, Belmont, in 
Braintree at the South Shore 
Plaza, and also at the Sheraton 



Aquinas 

Junior 

College 

for 
women 



Library 

Boston Hotel. 

Miss Piraino is a member of 
the Copley Society of Boston 
where she has exhibited. She is 
also a member of the Braintree 
Art Association. She has 
exhibited at the Scituate Art 
Association Fair, at the Fuller 
Art Museum in Brockton, and at 
the South Shore Plaza Art Fair, 
where she received Second Prize 
in, 1972, and First Prize in 1973 
in the Braintree Exhibit. 




Accredited by Accrediting Commission ! Washington, D.C 



Confers Associate Degree 

FIELDS OF CONCENTRATION 



Fashion Medical 

Merchandising Assistant 

MILTON, 02186 

303 Adams Street 

(617 J 698-7511 
WlUTE : Director of Admission s at above address 
Resident Facilities Available in neafty private homes. 



Secretarial 
Science 

- Executive 
-- Legal 

- Medical 
- Therapeutic 



Thursday, January 10, 1974 Quincy Sun Page 7 




ENGAGED - Mr. and Mrs. Stephen R Cook of 10 Bradford St., 
Quincy, announce the engagement of their daughter Stephanie Ann 
to Donald Paul Minchello. He is the son of the late Mr. and Mrs. 
Vincent Minchello of 53 Marshall St., Medford. Miss Cook is a 
graduate of Fontbonne Academy and Tufts Dental School, and is 
employed by the Dental Associates of Quincy, Inc. Mr. Marshall is a 
graduate of Bentley College. He is attending Bentley's Graduate 
School and is a senior staff accountant for the Reece Corporation of 
Waltham. A Sept. 21 wedding is planned. 

[Ciro's] 

QHS Class Of 1954 
Planning 20th Reunion 



The Quincy High School class 
of 1954 is planning its 20th 
anniversary reunion to be held 
Sept. 21. 

The reunion committee is 
presently mailing out 
notifications and 47 class 
members cannot be located. 
Anyone with information 
regarding their current addresses 
is asked to contact Mario 
Marinilli of 41 Cotton Ave., 
Braintree [848-3605] or Mrs. 
Bernice Sage Walsh of 191 Beach 
St., Wollaston [471-0091]. 



The 
are: 



'missing" class members 



Arlene Annan Sherman, 
Ernest Armburg, Marelyn Arthur 
Gregorio, Eugene Arnold, 
Robert Barry, Kenneth Black, 
Eleanor Brackett Robbins, Joan 
Burgess Carvell, Robert Cambull, 
Robert Carter, Nancy Collins 
Dupont, Lawrence Crawford, 
Geraldine Devine McDonnell, 
Thomas Ducia, Jean Fryar 
Dowling. 



'ERMANENT 



David Ghiglio, Marie Gravina 
Tauras, William Greene, Barbara 
Hartnett Rand, Janet Hartrey 
Salvucci, Bruce Harvester, 
Ronald Hatcher, Dorothy 
Helender Kraynack, Virginia 
Hodkinson Sylvester, Richard 
Hyland, Carl Johnson, Philip and 
Joyce Benn Kimball, Paul Koski, 

Bernard Matterazzo, Inez 
MacPhee Selipo, Joan Mahoney, 
William Mattson. 

Roberta Mattson Rowell, 
James McGonnigal, Richard 
Miller, Charles Moore, Maire 
Mula Connolly, James Murray, 
John Nicholas, Robert Norton, 

June Nutting Vespeziani, George 
Reid, Shirley Reburn Pool, Paul 
Rioux Sey fried, Paul Roach, 
Richard , Talbot, Donald 
Whittemore. 




At Quincy City Hospital 
December 29 

Mr. and Mrs. Kenneth 
Newton, 15 Prospect Ave., a 
daughter. 

Mr. and Mrs. Kostas 
Papadopoulos, 79 Suomi Rd, a 
son, 

Mr. and Mrs. John Davidson, 
249 South Central Ave., a 
daughter. 

Mr. and Mrs. Robert Weikel, 
121 Edwin St., a son. 

December 30 . 

Mr. and Mrs. William Sponer, 
213 Presidents Lane, a daughter. 

January 1 

Mr. and Mrs. Robert M. Koch, 
99 Nightingale Ave., a daughter. 

January 2 

Mr. and Mrs. Ralph Cedrone, 
300 Centre St., a son. 

January 3 

Mr. and Mrs. Paul Vickers, 
1453 Furnace Brook Parkway, a 
daughter. 

January 4 

Mr. and Mrs. Shek Chan, 41 
Woodward Ave., a son. 

At St. Margaret's Hospital 

December 29 

Mr. and Mrs. John Falcone, 
23 Atherton St., a son. 

At South Shore Hospital 

December 28 

Mr. and Mrs. Norman A. 
Edminster, 6 Division St., a son. 

December 29 

Mr. and Mrs. David P. 
Connolly, 19 Nelson St., a 
daughter. 

December 3 1 

Mr. and Mrs. Frank W. Fogal, 
116 Phillips St., a daugher. 



ragg) 

MJg, 



MUSCULAR 
DYSTROPHY 



REMOVAL 



UNWANTED 




Quincy Sons Of Italy 
Social Center 

120 Quarry St., Quincy 

Newest function hall now available for weddings, showers, dinner, 
dances. Main [Golden Lion] Suite has cathedral ceiling. Brides 
room - ultra modem sound system. Completely air conditioned. 

BOR RESERVATION CALL 
773-2687 AFTER 2 P.M. 



MARLENE 
MELAMED RE. 

Registered and Licensed 
Electrologist 
1151 Hancock St. 
Quincy 
By Aopointment only 
Call 773-1330 



W&3&*?- U On* of the hioit REASONAB 

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ENGAGED - Mr. and Mrs. Clifton E. Sommers of 86 Sachem St., 
Wollaston, announce the engagement of their daughter, Kathleen 
Rita to Eugene W. Creedon of 52 Kendall St., North Quincy. He is 
the son of the late Deputy Fire Chief and Mrs. Peter J. Creedon. Miss 
Sommers is a graduate of Fontbonne Academy and Boston State 
College. She is a teacher in the Quincy Public Schools. Mr. Creedon 
attended the Quincy public schools. He is a graduate of St. Mary's, 
Techny, III., and received his master's degree from Boston State 
College. He is the principal of the Francis W. Parker School, North 
Quincy. A June 29 wedding is planned. 

[Miller Studio] 

Morrisette Post 
To Mark 'Italian Night' 



The Morrisette Legion Post, 
will observe 'Italian Night' Jan. 
15 at 7:30 p.m. at the post 
home, Miller St., West Quincy. 

The post Christmas Charity 
Fund donated $4,150 to the 
following: 

Paul A. Dever School, 
Wrentham State School, Quincy 



City Hospital, St. ColettaV 
School, Association for Brain 
Damaged Children, Weymouth 
Memorial School, Finnish 
Gospel Hour, Rabbi Jacob Mann 
and the Salvation Army. 

The Women's Auxiliary ran a 
cake sale at the recent business 
meeting. 



S.S. Secretaries Hear 
Peace Corps Volunteer 



The South Shore Chapter of 
The National Secretaries 
Association [International] held 
its monthly meeting Tuesday, at 
Valle's Steak House, Braintree. 

Mrs. Linda Raiss, a former 
Peace Corps Volunteer who 



served in Tunisia, was the 
featured speaker. 

Membership in The National 
Secretaries Association 
[International] is open to any 
secretary with two years of 
secretarial experience. 



TIMEX 



® 



Factory authorized Service Center 

In and Out-of Warranty Watches Repaired 

Genuine TIMEX Energy Cells available 



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Jewelers 



1 402 HANCOCK STREET QUINCY 
773-6340 



SAVE 20% 

TO 50% 

Dresses • Pantsuits 
Sportswear - Sizes 8 To 20 

FASHION SH0PF 

1538 Hancock St., Quincy 

Mori. thruSat. 10 to 5 Thurs. & Fri. til 
7734748 




Page 8 Quincy Sun Thursday, January 10, 1974 

STRICTLY PERSONAL 

Eden is only place 
for perfectionist 



By PAT and 

MARILYN DAVIS 

Copley News Service 

Dear Pat and Marilyn: 

I have a problem — my hus- 
band. This man wants every- 
thing perfect. He will go to 
any length to make even the 
smallest detail just right for 
himself, and I am getting 
truly upset trying to please 
him. 

Last week he complained 
about the way I ironed his 
shirts, about the brand of pa- 
per towels I purchased, about 
the length of time it took me to 
scrub the kitchen floor, and 
the final comment was that I 
did not have enough variety in 
the meals I prepared. He has 
suggestions about everything 
— the way I should wear my 
hair, the dress I should or 
should not purchase, the 
amount of makeup to wear, 
and the job to apply for. 

This perfectionist is 30 
years old. I am 25, work 8 
hours a day, and keep house 
and prepare balanced meals. 
What else can I do? 

Beth 

Dear Beth: 

Send your husband to the 



Garden of Eden! That is the 
only place he can find perfec- 
tion. Certainly not on this 
planet. 

Dear Pat and Marilyn: 

My mother-in-law is a 
prodder, prober, and pusher. 
Yet, this woman has a heart of 
gold She is kind and I don't 
want to hurt her but she has to 
stop her constant surveil- 
lance. 

She insists on knowing 
where my husband and I are 
every waking moment. If we 
go on a weekend trip, she 
wants to know where we in- 
tend to go, when we intend to 
leave, and when we will re- 
turn. She calls every day and 
asks what I'm cooking. If we 
buy a new piece ot furniture, 
she insists on knowing the 
price. I could go on and on but 
the point is — how can I han- 
dle this without hurting her? 

Sissy 

Dear Sissy: 

A pushy, probing person has 
to be handled with the same 
lack of understanding and 
tact that they employ. In 
other words, tell Mom to stop 
tampering. She will meddle as 
much as you allow. 



Alcohol and pills are a lethal mix 



Everyone knows gasoline 
and alcohol don't mix, but The 
Travelers Insurance Compa- 
nies reports that alcohol and 



pills are perhaps as volatile. 
Even cold pills and a cock- 
tail can make the sane driver 
act like the town drunk. — 



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NOW ACCEPTING APPLICATIONS 



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DAY OR EVENING CLASSES 
FULL OR PART TIME 



CALL OR COME IN FOR BROCHURE 
24 COTTAGE AVE., QUINCY - 471-1673 






To-da^ Women 



COOKING CORNER 



These recipes are easy 
on post-holiday budget 



By SUSAN DELIGHT 
Copley News Service 

After the holidays comes 
the reckoning. The budget has 
been strained by holiday 
merrymaking and gift giving, 
bills are coming in, and in- 
come tax time is in the offing. 

It is now that the homemak- 
er must use her most canny 
knowledge to save on the food 
dollar, and yet keep her fam- 
ily well nourished and 
pleased. 

Recipes given today are the 
easy-on-the-budget variety. 
What's more, they are differ- 
ent enough to interest family 
members into partaking. 

QUICK AND EASY 
MUFFINBURGERS 

1 pound ground beef 
M» pound sausage meat 
1 cup seasoned prepared 

bread stuffing mix 
1 cup canned apple sauce 
V4 cup sweet pickle relish 
1 tablespoon instant minced 

onion 

1 teaspoon salt 
Vz teaspoon pepper 
1 egg, beaten 

Combine all ingredients in 
large mixing bowl, mixing 
well. Let stand Ms hour. Spoon 
meat mixture into 12 lightly 
greased muffin tins. Bake at 
350 degrees for 20 to 25 min- 
utes. Serve hot with buttered 
carrots and boiled potatoes. 
Accompany with a tossed 
salad. Makes 6 servings. 

GOURMET CHICKEN 
WRAP-UPS 

4 boned and skinned half 

chicken breasts 
V4 cup butter or margarine 
1 can (8 oz.) refrigerated 

quick crescent dinner rolls 
1 can (2V* 02.) or Vi cup 

deviled ham 
Milk 
Sesame seed 



Our Building Is Ris 
Your Interest Is Ris 



ing 
ing 




TEMPORARY QUARTERS 
WHILE OUR NEW BUILDING IS 
UNDER CONSTRUCTION 
440 HANCOCK ST., NORTH QUINCY 
FULL SERVICES AS USUAL 



HOURS: 
DAILY 9-3, FRIDAY 9-5:30 
479-6040 



BRANCH OFFICE 
100 GRANITE ST., DOWNTOWN 
DAILY 11-6, FRIDAY 11-8 
SATURDAY 10-2 
471-3900 





cooperative 




LOW-COST DISH -- Quick and Easy Muff inburgers require less than 
a half hour of baking time. Unusual ingredients are applesauce, 
pickle relish and stuffing mix. 



Filling: 

Two-thirds cup finely 
chopped tart apples 

2 tablespoons chopped pig- 
nolia nuts or almonds 

2 tablespoons raisins, if de- 
sired 

1 teaspoon instant minced 
onion 

1 teaspoon chopped chives 

l 4 to V2 teaspoon sweet basil 

Sauce: 

1 package (% oz.) chicken 
gravy mix 
Ms cup water 
Mi cup dairy sour cream 
Oven 375 degrees. 4 serv- 
ings. 

Place chicken breasts, 
boned-side up, between two 
pieces of plastic wrap. Start- 
ing at center, pound with a 
smooth, heavy object until 
pieces are about ft inch thick. 
Peel off plastic wrap. Divide 
filling equally among the 4 
breasts. Fold up each so fill- 
ing is enclosed and fasten with 
wooden picks. Brown chicken 
rolls in butter over medium 
heat until golden brown and 



meat is cooked. Cool enough 
to handle; remove picks. 

Separate crescents into 4 
rectangles. Press perfora- 
tions of each to seal; spread 
with deviled ham. Place 1 
chicken roll on each rectan- 
gle; fold up dough to enclose 
chicken and seal completely. 
Place seam-side down on un- 
greased cookie sheet. Brush 
with milk and sprinkle with 
sesame seed. Bake at 375 de- 
crees for 12 to 18 minutes or 
until golden brown. Serve hot 
with sauce. 

Filling: Combine all ingre- 
dients; mix well. 

Sauce: In small sauce pan, 
combine gravy mix and wa- 
ter. Bring to a boil; boil 1 min- 
ute. Blend in sour cream. 
Heat through, but do not boil. 
Serve hot. 

Tip: Wrap-Ups may be pre- 
pared, covered and refriger- 
ated 2 to 3 hours before bak- 
ing. Increase baking time 5 
minutes. 

Generic Term: 1 can (8 oz.) 
refrigerated quick crescent 
dinner rolls. 



Some are allergic to cheap jewelry 



About 11 per cent of the pop- 
ulace is allergic to cheap jew- 
elry. 

The offending ingredient is 



usually nickel sulfate, found 
often in low-priced nickel- 
plated costume jewelry. — 
CNS 




HUTCHINSON Oil CO. el QUINCY, INC 



261 Quincy Av... Quincy, 472-1131 




'""'plumber? 

PLUMBING 
HEATING 



Complete Bathroom Remodeling 
RALPH J. MAHER CORP. 

339 SOUTHERN ARTETtYTQUINW 
MASTER UC. NO. 7596 




Your Horoscope Guide 



For The Week Of 
Jan. 13 to 19 

By GINA 
Copley News Service 

ARIES: (March 21 to April 

19 — Also Aries Ascendant) — 

Lay your cards on the table 
regarding problem with mate 
or partner — you may discov- 
er that it is not as big as you 
thought. Concentrate on one 
project at a time and see it 
through. Be helpful to loyal 
friends. 

TAURUS: (April 20 to May 

20 — Also Taurus Ascendant) 

— Work quietly in the back- 
ground now laying the 
groundwork for future proj- 
ects. Artistic talents are ac- 
tive — use them. Opportunity 
to form a partnership should 
be investigated. Speculation 
not favored now. 

GEMINI: (May 21 to June 
20 — Also Gemini Ascendant) 
— Take time out for leisure — 
attend a theatrical event. 
Give special attention to 
household pets, adjusting diet 
if necessary. Spend the week- 
end in a private kind of way 
with your mate or partner — 
alone, together. 

CANCER: (June 21 to July 
22 — Also Cancer Ascendant) 

— Things are looking up and 
you feel more optimistic. 
Good time to remodel, redec- 
orate, refurnish your home. 
Do the work yourself so as not 
to strain budget. Resist im- 



pulsive reactions to work irri- 
tations. 

LEO: (July 23 to August 22 

— Also Leo Ascendant) — Be 
objective about family prob- 
lem. Short trips to visit rela- 
tives are a possibility and 
may clear up some anxieties. 
Use care in wording corre- 
spondence so that the mean- 
ing is crystal clear. Use your 
charm to get results. 

VIRGO: (August 23 to Sept. 
22 —Also Virgo Ascendant) — 

Your intuition is razor sharp 
and you can see through other 
people's motives. Work goes 
well as you use your ingenuity 
to complete difficult tasks. 
Stick close to your budget and 
resist extravagant impulses. 

LIBRA: (Sept. 23 to Oct. 22 

— Also Libra Ascendant) — 

Enjoy social whirl but don't 
neglect areas of intellectual 
growth. This is a good time to 
start a study program or re- 
fresher course. Resist extrav- 
agant spending for luxury 
items. Work first — then play. 

SCORPIO: (Oct. 23 to Nov. 
21 — Also Scorpio Ascendant) 

— All signals are "go" in your 
career. Present plans to those 
in authority. You appear to 
have much personal support 
now. Guard your temper at 
home. Think before you 
speak. Catch up on bookkeep- 
ing chores. 

SAGITTARIUS: (Nov. 22 to 
Dec. 21 — Also Sagittarius As- 



Energy-saving tips for electric stoves 



When cooking on top of an 
electric range, be sure pots 
and pans fit the surface units, 
advises Commonwealth Edi- 
son Co. — a pan smaller than 
the unit lets heat go up the 



sides and wastes electricity. 
Other tips: Use utensils 
with flat bottoms and tightly 
fitting covers and cook vege- 
tables in small amounts of 
water. — CNS 



cendant) — Tremendous op- 
portunity now to develop a 
new talent. Community ser- 
vice activities are favored 
too. Use strength of character 
in carrying out plans to solve 
a family situation. Launch 
new plans later. 

CAPRICORN: (Dec. 22 to 
Jan. 19 — Also Capricorn As- 
cendant) — You have a sec- 
ond chance to launch a project 
or idea which didn't quite 
come off before. It could bring 
you honors as well as finan- 
cial increase. Listen to friends 
with constructive ideas. 

AQUARIUS: (Jan. 20 to 
Feb. 18 — Also Aquarius As- 
cendant) — Use your ingenu- 
ity and originality to make 
great progress in business or 
through an organization. Jea- 
lousies may surround you — 
stay calm and steady. Be 
logical and initiate effeciency 
operational methods. 

PISCES: (Feb. 19 to March 
20 — Also Pisces Ascendant) 

— Resist impulse to spend 
over your budget or run up 
charge accounts. A jealous 
person may be working 
against you in secret. Ro- 
mance could bloom most dra- 
matically now. Be charming, 
romantic and kind. 

A Home Study Course in Be- 
ginners Astrology is now 
available. For information, 
write: Your Horoscope Guide, 
Copley News Service, in care 
of this newspaper. 



CHAMPAGNE 
INVENTOR 

Dom Perignon, a monk with 
the Hautvillers Abbey, is gen- 
erally credited with the inven- 
tion of champagne around 
1700. - CNS 



General Electrics 





20.8 CU. FT. NO-FROST 
REFRIGERATOR- FREEZER 
Only 30'*" Wide, 66* High.. 

GIANT 6.96 CU. FT. FREEZER... 
BIGGEST AVAILABLE IN A 
TOP-FREEZER MODEL... 
HOLDS UP 70 243 POUNDS 
OF FROZEN FOOD 

FREEZFR FEATURES: 

• Jet Fr- •■-./<» ice compartment 

• Ice n £jsy Service (or, add an 
Auton atic Icemaker, available at 
extra cost) 

REFRIGERATOR FEATURES: 

• Adjustable Meat Pan-attaches 
to any Adjustable Cantilever Shelf 

e Generous door storage 

• Rolls out on Big Wheels 



sooosima 

Another tetso* 
why St is 
Amend % *l 
ms/ot 
tfplilKt like 




HANCOCK 

TIRE & APPLIANCE CO. 

115 FRANKLIN ST. 
SOUTH QUINCY 472 1710 
Next To The Adim's Birthplace 



BRAINTREE 

TV & APPLIANCE CO. 

17 HANCOCK ST. 
BRAINTREE SQ. 843 4250 



Thursday, January 10, 1974 Quincy Sun Page 9 

Use ironing board 
for quick mending 



By BETTY W. KINSER 
Copley News Service 

Each week, somewhere be- 
tween Monday and Friday, I 
iron an average of 35 shirts. 
And each week, somewhere 
between Monday and Friday, 
at least three of those shirts 
are going to need mending. 

Since mending isn't my fa- 
vorite pastime, I try to sneak 
up on it. So, sitting on my 
ironing board is a small pin 
cushion that holds six or seven 
needles, each threaded with a 
different color thread. 

When I come across a but- 
ton that's loose or a small 
tear, I whip out the proper 
needle and thread and do a 



quick fix-it. Keeps the mend- 
ing from piling up, and some 
times I don't even notice I've 
done it. 

PS : Save the big jobs for the 
machine. 



QUICK STITCH: From 
Mrs. Gary Agler, Poison, 
Montana — The handiest 
cleaning tool one can have 
around the sewing machine is 
one of those tiny brushes that 
come with electric shavers. 
They reach down around the 
bobbin case and remove all 
lint. Too bad manufacturers 
don't include one in the kit 
that comes with a sewing ma- 
chine. 



Open Fm. Eves TNI 9' 




JOIN THE FAMILY 

When You Diet 



Dinner for all, diet for one — all out of the 
same pot. Here's how the dieter can join the 
family round the table for soundly nutritious, 
roundly delicious high-protein meals. Losers 
lose and non-losers gain the benefits of good 
eating. The family cook relaxes. Learn how at 
Diet Workshop classes week of January 14. For 
further information call: 986-6161 

THE DIET WORKSHOP 
OPEN HOUSE WEEK 

MONDAY, Jan. 14 -7:30 p.m. 

TUESDAY, Jan. 15 - 9:30 a.m. 

TEMPLE ADAS SHALOM 

435 Adams St., Quincy 

TUESDAY, Jan. 15 7:30 p.m. 

ATLANTIC MEMORIAL CONG. CHURCH 
136 Sagamore St., No. Quincy 

WEDNESDAY, Jan. 16 9:30 a.m. 
WEDNESDAY, Jan. 16 - 7:30 p.m. 
QUINCY Y.M.C.A. 
79 Coddington St., Quincy 

THURSDAY, Jan. 17 - 9:30 a.m. i 

THURSDAY, Jan. 17 - 7:30 p.m. 

BETHANY CONG. CHURCH 

18 Spear St., Quincy Center 



No obligation for attending. First meeting 
will be held at conclusion of Open House. 



FREE meal-planning guides and 
recipes available at meeting. 

NEW MEMBERS 
WELCOME ANYTIME 

$6.00 1st visit - $2.00 weekly 
For more information rail: 986-6161 [Randolph] 



% m i ■ • a a • m •>• i 



«■«*•«•«■"• i 



i •• • • »• * 



»■•■■• • • • * • 






■'■'■ I I 
• • • . • • I i • ■ 



r 



Page lOQuincy Sun Thursday, January 10, 1974 



New Books Topic For Wollaston Women 



WINTER CLEARANCE 
10to50%OFF 



SALE 



Suits Sweaters Hats & Caps 

Sportcoats Spt. & Knit Shirts All Weather Coats 

Dress Trousers Casual Slacks Ties & Gloves 



ENTIRE STOCK 25 to 50% OFF 
Jackets - Carcoats - Topcoats 



stom HOUKS 

Mon.-Thurl.-rrl. 
9A.M.-9.00P.M. 

Tuts. -W.d. Sol. 
9 00 A.M. -5 30 P.M. 




Since 1919 



• Donotier'»Chorj» 

• CAP. 

• IANKAME»!CA»D 

• MASTER CHAKO*/ 



Clolhing for Men, Quincy 



EASY PARKING... .Enter Via 1 564 Hancock St. or J. Hancock Parking Area 
In the FORMAL DEN-TUXEDOS FOR WEDDINGS & SOCIALS 



WINTER SALE 

of SHOES 
and BOOTS 

YOU SAVE AN ADDITIONAL 

FAMOUS BRANDS 




OFF 



OUR REGULAR LOW PRICES 

MILTON 
Factory Shoe Outlet 

564 ADAMS ST., 
EAST MILTON SQUARE 

Open Daily 'til 6 P.M. - Thurs. & Fri. 'til 9 P.M. 





Betty Nelson, dramatist and 
book-reviewer, will select and 
highlight the best of the new 
books at a meeting of the 
Wollaston Woman's Club 
Tuesday, Jan. 15, at 'Wollaston 
Lutheran Church Hall. 

Mrs. Nelson, a graduate of the 
Prescott Radio and TV School in 
Boston, has featured some of the 
world's great authors on her 
popular radio program "Book 
Studio" over Station WTAG in 
Worcester. 

She will be introduced by 
Miss Helen A. Mowry. 

Hostesses for the 1 p.m. social 
hour will be Mrs. Gilbert M> Fox 
and members of the Preservation 
of Antiques Committee. They 
are: 

Mrs. Ralph M. Eastman, Mrs. 
Clyde W. Haskins, Mrs. Harold P. 
Hilstrom, Mrs. E. Fr*anklin 
Holland, Mrs. John F. Kenney, 
Mrs. Charles Lamb, Mrs. John F. 
Raymond, Mrs. Richard D. 
Schiavo and Mrs. William B. 
Vaughn. 

Mrs. Stewart Berry and Mrs. 
John E. Wright will pour. 

Mrs. Harold M. Knowles will 
preside at the 2 p.m. business 
meeting at which the honor 
guest will be Mrs. Anthony 
Losordo, second district 
director, and special guest will 
be Mrs. Agnes Ford, librarian at 
the Wollaston branch of the 
Thomas Crane Public Library. 

The program, "The Museum 
Comes to You", originally 
scheduled for Jan. 15,- has been 
postponed until March. 

Montclair Senior 

Citizens To 
Install Jafd4 

Mrs, Rena Howard will ; be 

installed as the president of the 

Modtclair Senior Citizens 

'Association : at ceremonies Jan. 

14 at the Montclair Men's Club. 

Other officers include Emma 
Harris, vice president; Mary 
O'Donnell, treasurer; and Kay 
Bamford, secretary. 



wey-bANkl 



Join Our 

GARDEN 
CLUB 



Start Saving today for your Spring 
Garden with a Garden Club Savings 
Account from Weymouth Savings 
Bank. 



NAME YOUR OWN CLUB- SAVE FOR 

YOUR DREAM NOW Here's a few ideas 

Christmas Club - Tax Club - Automobile Club 
Vacation Club - Dinner Club - Furniture Club 
Use your imagination - start your own club 
and watch your savings grow at C 0/ 

0% /O 




WEyiMOUTh 
SAV.NGS 

bAIMK 




47 WASHINGTON ST. 
WEYMOUTH LANDING 
337-2700 

383 BRIDGE STREET 
[Rte.3Al NORTH WEYMOUTH 
337-3838 

Branch Office 
Open Saturday 
9:00 A.M. to 1:00 P.M. 




MILESTONE - Mr. and Mrs. Frank L. Bates of 109 Curtis Ave., 
Quincy, were honored Sunday in observance of their 65th wedding 
anniversary. 

Mr., Mrs. Frank Bates 
Celebrate 65th Anniversary 



Mr. and Mrs. Frank Bates of 
109 Curtis Ave., Quincy Point 
were guests of honor Sunday at 
a family dinner party in 
observance of their 65th 
wedding anniversary, at the 
Hearthside Restaurant, Hanover. 

The party was given by their 
children Mrs. Kenneth 
MacDonald [Mildred Bates], 
John, Harold and Russell of 
Quincy and Lester Bates of New 



Hampshire. They have nine 
grand children and 10 great 
grandchildren. 

Mrs. Bates is the former 
Leona Rizzi of Quincy. Mr. and 
Mrs. Bates have lived in Quincy 
since their marriage. Before his 
retirement, Mr. Bates worked at 
New England Confectionary of 
Cambridge. 

The couple are members of 
the Senior Citizens of Quincy. 



Seniors To See 



Ice Follies Feb. 22 



sm 



The Quincy Park and 
Recreation Board announces 
that a Senior Citizens trip to the 
Boston Garden has been 
scheduled for Friday, Feb. 22, 
to see a 1:30 matinee 
performance of the Ice Follies 
starring Janet Lynn. 

Charles L. Alongi Jr., assistant 
Director of Recreation reports a 
limited number of reserved seats 
at the Garden will be issued on a 
first come first serve basis at a 
reduced price. Ticket sales began 
today [Thursday] in the 



Recreation Office located on the 
second Tioo'r in the 1 SoftrV*F. 
Kennedy Health Center. 

Free bus transportation will 
be provided from the regular 10 
locations for those who purchase 
a reduced price ticket. The event 
is for all senior citizens of 
Quincy in the 60 years of age or 
over bracket. The Recreation 
Office will be open Monday 
through Friday from 8:30 a.m. 
to 4:30 p.m. No telephone 
reservations will be accepted. 



Broad Meadows Parents 
Board Meeting Jan. 21 



The regular Broad Meadows 
Parent Board meeting will be 
postponed until Monday, Jan. 
21, at 8 p.m., in the school's 
Media Center. 

Also postponed to the same 
date will be the counselors' 
monthly evening "open house" 




[Grade 7; Grade 9]. The regular 
schedule of the second Monday 
of the month will resume in 
February for both counselors 
and the Board. 

A counselor will also be 
available at the Board meeting 
Jan. 21 to explain the steps that 
will be taken for planning 
program in grade nine and high 
school. AH parents who have 
students in grades eight or nine 
are invited to attend this 
information session. 



Storewide Clearance 

on all 
merchandise 



FASHION 



LILLIAN'S "Z 

532 ADAMS STREET, EAST MILTON SO. 
#Q 698-9761 BsSl 






'Well Baby Clinic' At 
Southwegt Community Center 



Thursday, January 10, 1974 Quincy Sun Page 1 1 

38 Pints Of Blood 
Donated At Viking Club 



The Southwest Community 
Center is operating a "Well Baby 
Clinic'-' in cooperation with the 
City Health Department at 
which Quincy children from ages 
two months to five years, may 
receive free immunization shots. 

Physicians from the health 
department will administer 
polio, measles, and other 
vaccines at the Southwest 
Community Center the first 
Monday of every month, from 
10 to 1 1 a.m. The program 
began Monday. 

Adults who are in need of 
booster or immunizations shots 
may also, receive them then. 
Physicians also offer advice and 



answer questions for parents, 
and will weigh and measure 
babies and administer free 
vitamins. 

On Thursday, from 2 to 8 
p.m., the Southwest Community 
Center runs a "Community 
Food Coop". 

Each week 50 householders 
place orders at the Community 
Center for fresh fruits, 
vegetables, eggs, cheese, and 
meats, which are bought at the 
New England Food Produce 
Center in Chelsea, through the 
Boston Food Coop, at reduced 
prices. 

"The basic premise of the 
Community Food Coop," said 



one Community Center official, 
"is that by combining a number 
of households' food orders into 
one large order, food can be 
bought at wholesale prices." 
Food items are offered at 1 per 
cent above wholesale to cover 
transportation costs. 

Initial membership in the 
"food coop" is $1 and is open to 
any family, regardless of income 
or place of residence. Each 
household is required to work in 
distributing the food at the 
Community Center once every 
two weeks. 

For more information call the 
Southwest Community Center at 
471-0796. 



1974 S.S. Economy Chamber Topic Jan. 16 



The South Shore economy in 
.1974 will be the panel topic of 
the Jan. 16 7:44 breakfast 
meeting of the South Shore 
Chamber of Commerce at 
Valle's, Braintree. 

The theme is entitled 
"1974...one hell of a year?". 
Moderator will be Charles A. 
Pearce, president, Quincy 
Savings Bank. Panelists will be 
representatives of the banking, 
development, retail and 
industrial areas. 

Francis E. Hassey, economist, 
The Schofield Companies; 
Nathan Shulman, President, Best 
Chevrolet; and P. Takis Veliotis, 
President, Quincy Shipbuilding 
Division of General Dynamics. 

The panel will look to the 
economic indicators of the past 
year and forecast the year ahead. 

New Pottery 
Classes At 

Qumey YMCA 

■ New classes in pottery began 
Monday arid Tuesday at the 

Quincy YMCA. 

Class' times are '9 a.m., 1 p.m., 
.3:30. p.m.., .and 7 p.m. Each class 
is. two hours in length. The 
: course consists Of 10 lessons. 
..Instructor is Eileen Jacobs, a 
graduate of Adelphi University. 
Eileen spent her junior year 
studying at the Baring Crafts 
School in Asperup, Denmark. 
She continued her study of 
Ceramics at the Charles Street 
Potters, in Boston. During the 
past several years, Eileen's work 
has been exhibited at the 
Swirbul Library, New York, the 
Ruth S. Harley University 
Center, and the Adelphi Art 
Department. 

Pre^registration is required. 
For further information, contact 
the Quincy YMCA, 79 
Coddington St;, Quincy 
[479-8500], 



WOODWARD'S 

EXPERT 

FRONT END 

WORK 

AND 

ALIGNMENT 

111 Mayor McGrath Highway 
Quincy, Mass. 

TELEPHONE: 773-1200 



The discussion will include the 
stock market, the trends [if 
any] in the business community, 
the money situation, the 
employment picture, "Simon 
says...," and the toll of the 



energy crisis. 

Reservations for the meeting 
can be made by contacting the 
Chamber at 479-1 111 or by 
writing 36 Miller Stile Rd, 
Quincy. 



Mrs. Mildred Ambrosia, 
Volunteer Blood Donor 
Chairman for the Greater 
Quincy Red Cross Chapter, 
announces that 38 pints of 
blood were donated at a recent 
bloodmobile visit at the Viking 
Club, Braintree, sponsored by 
Stenkil Lodge 92. 

Frank Jacobson was blood 
chairman and Walter Swanson 
co-chairman. Mrs. Lars Johnson 
recruited donors for the visit. 

Those giving were: 

Stenkil Lodge 92 - Clifford W. 
Anderson, Maureen P. Berggren, 
Carl H. Boman Jr., Bertel L. 
Carlson, Warren G. Clarke, 
Charles H. Collins, Elaine E. 
Cook, Roger W. Cook, John R. 
Elander Jr., Arthur B. Erikson, 
Frederick J. Fitzgerald, Karlyn 
M. Hanson, Harold M. Allonden, 
Doris F. Johnson, John J. Kelly, 
Evelyn T. Kyller, Kenneth 
Littlewood, David F. Lundin, 
Karen L. Lundin, Roy J. McRae, 
Ronald E. Nelson, Jerry S. 



Peterson, Hans G. Rousayne, 
Beril E. Rousayne, H. Margareta 
Rundquist, Donald F. Smith, 
Linda K. Swanson and Robert 
W. Swanson. 

Boston Gas Co. - Walter S. 
Brown, Joseph H. Leary, Gerald 

A. McClusky, Emmet P. Meehan, 
Edward F. O'Gara, T. Robert 
Reynolds and Ruth M. Swain. 

Norfolk Union Lodge - Lance 

B. Heaton. 

Replacement - Robert 
Simpson. 

Mrs. Ambrosia, in charge of 
volunteers, was assisted by Miss 
Catherine Osborne and Mrs. 
Nello Ottaviani, Red Cross 
volunteers. 

Members of the Stenkil Lodge 
92 who volunteered their ■ 
services were Mrs. Lars Johnson, 
Mrs. Robert Johnson, Mrs. Philip 
Westar, Mrs. Arthur Erikson, 
Mrs. James Thorpe, Mrs. Warren 
Swanson, Mrs. Edwin Hanson 
and Mrs. Frank Jacobson. 




I 
I 
I 
I 
I 
I 
1 
I 



1 
■ 
I 



everybody who gets a government 
check through the mail 

Government Employees, 

Federal Retirees, Service Personnel, 

Disabled Veterans, 

Social Security Recipients 

If you look to the mail for your government check, we can offer you a thief-proof, 
time-saving way to do your banking. It's a banking plan that lets your check be sent 
directly from the government to your bank. Your check is automatically deposited 
in your account on the same day you'd normally receive your check. We guarantee 
that your check will be credited to your account on that date, even though we may 
receive your check at a later date. No more checks stolen from your mailbox. No 
more time-consuming trips to the bank. It's a nice, easy, and safe way to 
do your banking. 

If you're interested in our Government Check Banking Plan, please fill out the 
coupon and return it to us. We'll send you a Treasury Department form which, 
when completed and submitted by you to the agency that issues your check, will 
enable you to participate in our Government Check Banking Plan. Or, come in 
and ask us for a Treasury Department form (No. 1 189). We'll show you how simple 
it is to protect your government allotments. 



Please send Treasury Department form (No. 1189) so I can participate in your 

Government Check Banking Plan. £ 

Name R 

Address B 



City 



State. 



Zip. 



1 
1 



□ I now have a checking account at the Hancock Bank. (No ) 

□ I now have a savings account at the Hancock Bank. (No. _) 

D I am interested in opening a checking and/or savings account at the B 
Hancock Bank. 1 

Mail back to: Government Check Banking Plan, Hancock Bank and Trust Company 
1495 Hancock Street, Quincy, MA 02169 



KMSr^Q^ The Money Tree Bank 

$0 HANCOCK BANK 

Main office in Quincy Center, with 14 branches south and west of Boston 
Quincy 773-0500. Norwood 769-1300 

Member F D.I.C 



Page 12 Quincy Sun Thursday, January 10, 1974 



Young Ideas 

Unedited selections from the writings 
of Quincy's elementary school children. 



WINTER 

Winter Cold , windy tumbling, 
skating, coasting tun and very 
exciting season 

By Trisha Doherty 
Wollaston School 

A CAN OF PFAS 

Once upon a time there was a 
can of Peas. No Body Bought 
him. Then one day someone did. 
He was so Happy. But then 
when the people tried to pick 
him up he gasped with fright. 
But they were only going to 
name him. His new name was 
Wilber. He liked the children 
very much. But then one day 
they ate him for supper. There 
stomaches were full but his 
was nt. It was empty and dry, no 
water or anything. They threw 
him away and he got filled again. 
This same thing went on and on. 
on. on. The End. 

Vicki Ann Price 

Wollaston School 

Grade 4 

THE RULER 

Once upon a time there was a 
ruler. It was up in heaven. It 
came down and measured 
Everything. He was a good ruler. 
He did everything right. It rode a 
round in its car. It ate a lot and 
went out too. 

Robert Flynn 

Wollaston School 

Grade 4 

A TOOTH BRUSH 

When I was a tooth brush I 
was getting a bath in tooth 
paste. When one of my bristles 
fell out. 1 was shocked. 1 went 
on and on until one day my last 
bristles fell out. My last pal 
threw me away. So I went to 
tooth brush heaven. 

Deirdre Simmons 

Wollaston School 

Grade 4 



SOUTH SHORE 
SEWING MACHINE CO. 

We Service AH Makes Sewing 
Machines and Vacuum Cleaners 
665A Hancock St., Wollaston 
471-5982 



HOT CHOCOLATE HEAVEN? 

When I was hot chocolate, I 
was in a package. Some kid 
wanted some to drink. So he 
poured me in to a cup and put 
the water on the burner. The 
water boiled and he poured it all 
over me. I screamed but no one 
heard me. It was the end of me. 
All I remember is that he stirred 
me and drank me all up. I was 
dead. After that he had a funeral 
for me, Then | said good-bye 
and went to hot Chocolate 
heaven. He cried and he cried. In 
a way I felt bad for him. Then 
he had another cup of hot 
chocolate? 

Janet O'Mara 

Wollaston School 

Grade 4 

A HAMMER 

I am a hammer. I hammer a 
lot. I sit in the cellar too. I bang 
and I bang. I bang things 
together too. I break things too. 
What would you do with me? 

Scott Price 

Wollaston School 

Grade 4 

THE DESK 

I am a desk. I like the person 
who sits on my chair. She is a 
girl, her name is Stacey. She is a 
very nice girl. She feeds me in 
the morning, in the afternoon, 
and at night. 

Maureen Monagle 

Wollaston School 

Grade 4 

I AMTOOTHEY 

I was born in a mouth. I get a 
rub down with a hard tooth 
brush. I hurts. Every day I get all 
dirty with food. Today I am in a 
sack, the toothfairy's sack that 
is! The End. 

Bridget Feeney 
Wollaston School 
Grade 4 
PAINT 

Once a can of paint died. He 

came alive and everybody was 

happy. Then it worked again. 

What a surprise it was. The End. 

Nicola Carbone 

Wollaston School 

Grade 4 




WOLLASTON 
CREDIT UNION 

PERSONAL & AUTO LOANS 
NO NOTICE SAVINGS ACCTS. 
EARN5 1 /2%PCrt ANNUM 



SPECIAL 
NOTICE 



60/ P*R 
/o ANNUM 



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REAL ESTATE-MORTGAGES 
HOME IMPROVEMENTS 

ALL ACCOUNTS FULLY INSURED 
UNDER LAW BY MASS.C.U. 
SHARE INSURANCE CORP. 

651 HANCOCK ST., 
WOLLASTON 

773-3500 773-8600 

OPEN MON.-THURS. 9-8 TUES., WED., FRI.9-5 



ALLAN'S 

NEW YEAR SALE 

SPECIALS ON TAPE DECKS 
STEREO'S - RADIOS - TAPES 

OFF ALL 
% STEREOS 
OR CAR DECKS 

ALLAN'S TAPE & STEREO CENTER 

16 BcaleSt. 

Wollaston 

Next to Wollaston Theatre 

OPEN: 10 to 6 Mon. Tues. SaL 

10to9Wed.Thurs.Fri. 



WOLLASTON 



200-Unit Senior Complex 



Sargent H 
Agreement 

Gov. Francis Sargent is 
coming to Quincy Friday to sign 
the agreements that will clear 
the way for construction of the 
controversial $4.4 million Clay 
St. Senior Citizens Housing 
Project. 

The Governor will be 
welcomed at a noon luncheon at 
the Wollaston Golf Club and the 
signing ceremonies will be held 
at I p.m. at Fenno House, a 
senior citizens' facility at 540 
Hancock St., Wollaston. 

The contract to build the 
12-story, 200-unit apartment 
complex was finally awarded 
Dec. 20 after an eight-month- 
-long zoning dispute with 
abuttors and a brief controversy 
over bids for construction. 

Abuttors obtained a court 
injunction against the project 
while they challenged in court a 



ere Friday To Sign 
s For Clay St. Project 



Zoning Board of Appeals 
variance from a regulation that 
calls for one parking space per 
apartment unit. 

The appellate board's decision 
was based on the fact that the 
project would be located within 
walking distance of the 
Wollaston MBTA station and 
thus autos would not be a 
necessity for residents of the 
building. 

Legislation permitting the 
City Building Inspector, Alan 
Macdonald, to issue a building 
permit in spite of the injunction 
was filed by Sen. Arthur H. 
Tobin [D-Quincy) and passed in 
October, just before the deadline 
on federal financing expired. 

The project was originally 
figured to cost $4 million but 
inflation during the eight-month 
delay raised the price so much 
that the lowest bid obtained was 



$364,000 over that figure. 

Even after the contract was 
awarded, there were problems. 

The low bidder, DiLibero 
Brothers of Boston, backed out, 
saying that it would be unable to 
meet the terms of the contract. 

The second lowest bidder, 
James J. Welch Construction Co. 
of Salem, was awarded the 
contract after the State 
Department of Community 
Affairs ruled that the contract 
did not have to be readvertised 
for new bids. 

The Quincy Housing 
Authority claimed that calling 
for new bids would have boosted 
the cost even more since the 
whole complex would have had 
to be redesigned. 

The Housing Authority's 
waiting list for elderly housing 
has reached more than 1,500 
names. 



Delahunt Would Require Utilities 
To Give 10-Day Notice On Cut-Offs 



Rep. William D. Delahunt 
[D-Quincy] is co-sponsor of a 
bill that would require gas, 
electric and telephone 
companies _ to give delinquent 
customers 10 days notice before 
terminating services. 

The bill also provides that 
such notice be sent to the 
customer by certified mail and 
that Saturdays and Sundays be 
excluded from the 10-day grace 
period. 



"Under present law," said 
Delahunt, "critical gas, electric 
and telephone service can be 
terminated by a utility for 
non-payment or for various 
other reasons upon extremely 
short notice to the customer." 

Current law, he said, "permits 
a gas or electric company to 
send by regular mail a notice 
only three days prior to the time 
that the company intends to 
terminate service. 



"Termination of telephone 
service is unregulated by statute 
but the telephone companies 
have customarily . . . provided 
for extremely short notice of 
termination of telephone service. 

"Not only is it very difficult 
for a number of customers to 
raise enough money to pay a 
back bill on such short notice, 
but the notice itself sometimes 
goes astray because of the 
vagaries of the mails." 



Jewish Youth Enjoy Winter Vacation Program 



During the December school 
vacation, youths from Quincy 
and surrounding areas 
participated in three day-long 
programs sponsored by the 
South Area Jewish Community 
Center, 10 Merrymount Rd., 
Quincy. 



Forty elementary school age 
children took part in "Fun 
Day," including ice skating, 
games and films, and spent the 
day at the Stoneham Zoo. 

Youths from Canton, Sharon, 
Quincy, Randolph, Norwood 
and Westwood attended a 



Chanukah party at Grossman 
Camp in Westwood. The 
children were treated to a day of 
sports, games and latke cooking 
and eating, and saw a special 
production of the Chanukah 
Story by the Flapdoodle 
Puppets from Milford, N.H. 



Quincy Base For Kidney Pilot Fund Program 



Quincy has been designated as 
the base of operations for the 
first annual Kidney Foundation 
of Massachusetts, pilot 
door-to-door fund raising 
campaign, throughout the South 
Shore Area. 

Kidney Foundation official, 
Santa Fared, said that Dean 



. _ v AURORA 
ATA RACE SETS 

CARS & ACCESSORIES 
TYCO HO. TRAINS 

and Accessories 

DRUM SETS 
GUITARS 

Music Accessories 

MUSIC 
BOOKS 

Piano - Guitar 
Harmonica - Recorder 
All Organ - Chord Organ 

WOLLASTON 

MUSIC CENTER 
AND HOBBY SHOP 
27 Beale St. Wollaston 
Gall T73-5325 — 



Comeau, president of the 
Kidney Foundation and the 
Board of Directors have given 
careful thought to the pilot 
program and believes the South 
Shore area is representative of 
communities throughout 
Massachusetts. 

Mrs. John T. Riccuiti, 
chairwoman in charge of the 
entire area will be assisted by 
Mrs. Francis X. Bellotti and Mrs. 



WOLLASTON 

Beale St. off H.mcock St. 
QUINCY PR 3 1600 



JAN. 9TH THRU JAN. 15 



James R. Mclntyre. A steering 
committee in charge of 
volunteers will be chaired by 
Mrs. George Santry, chairwoman 
for the Kidney Foundation State 
Project with the Junior 
Federation of Women. 

The campaign will take place 
in March. 

Those wishing to serve as 
volunteers are asked ' to call 
261-1943. 




SHAMUS 

[P.G.] 7:30 P.M. 

GODSPELL 

A GREAT MUSICAL 
FOR ALL AGES 

[G.P.] 9:15 P.M. 



$1.00 ADMISSION AT 
ALL PERFORMANCES 



MUSIC LESSONS 

Professional Instruction 
DRUM PIANO GUITAR 
WOLLASTON MUSIC CENTER 
27 Beale St., Wollaston 
Call 773-5325 



* FLAGS * 

INDOOR OUTDOOR 
ACCESSORIES 



FLAGS MADE TO ORDER 

STATE FLAGS CHURCH FLAGS 

FLAGS OF ALL NATIONS 

EAGLE FLAG 
CO.,INC. 

147 Beach St., 472-8242 
-WoUartoftrMas*; 02170 



Chamber, Labor Dept. 

Sign $117,000 
Grant For 40 New Jobs 



A $1 17,000 contract between 
the South Shore Chamber of 
Commerce and the U.S. 
Department of Labor to fund 40 
new jobs has been entered into 
and formally signed. 

Signing for the Chamber of 
Commerce was President George 
Reardon, of President Chevrolet 
Inc., and for the U.S. Labor 
Department, Thomas Komarek, 
Manpower Division. The 
ceremony took place Monday at 
the Chamber's office, 36 Miller 
Stile Rd, Quincy. 

Congressman James A. Burke 
and Mayor Walter Hannon 
headed the guest list which 
included representatives from 
the National Alliance of 
Businessmen, Mass. Division of 
Employment Security, 
Community Action 
Organization, the Board of 
Directors of the Chamber and 
executives f rom participating 
business firms. 

The JOBS [Job Opportunities 
in the Business Sector] contract, 
designed with the assistance of 
the National Alliance of 
Businessmen, sets up a 
consortium of 1 1 South Shore 
business firms with the Chamber 
of Commerce acting as agent and 
administrator. 

Forty-one disadvantaged local 
residents' will be hired and 
trained to fill skilled jobs. The 
federal government agrees to 
subsidize 50 per cent of the 
salaries during the training 
period, lasting from 4 to 10 
months, depending on the skill 
level, and 100 per cent of the 
training, educational and 
counseling costs. 

The Quincy Community 
Action Organization will assist 



the Chamber of Commerce in 
providing the counseling 
component of the contract as 
will the Quincy School 
Department in regards to 
job-related education. 

The Quincy Office of the 
Division of Employment 
Security is handling the 
recruitment and interviewing for 
the 41 jobs, ranging from light 
industry 'to commercial 
enterprises of which the 
majority are in the 
Braintree-Hingham-Quincy area. 

Plans are already developing 
to make the JOBS Program a 
permanent fixture on the South 
Shore and the Chamber of 
Commerce is looking to its next 
contract. Job opportunities is 
one of the priorities of the 
Chamber of Commerce and this 
contract is one way the Chamber 
can partially realize its goal of 
full employment. 

Interested job applicants are 
urged to contact the South 
Shore Chamber of Commerce, 
36 Miller Stile Road, Quincy, or 
the Quincy Office, Department 
of Employment Security, 
Hancock Street, Quincy. 

Companies in the consortium: 
Quincy Adams Marine Basin, 
Inc.. of Quincy; Wollaston 
Alloys of Braintree; Grogan 
Business' Machines, Inc. of 
Quincy; President Chevrolet of 
Quincy; Miller Blueprint 
Company, Inc. of Quincy; Best 
Chevrolet of Hingham: South 
Shore National Bank of Quincy, 
Merriman, Inc. of Hingham: 
Helco Electric of Saugus [the 
jobs are in Weymouth); Auto 
Engineering South of Norwell; 
Native Footwear of Braintree. 



ENERGY 
SAVING 

100% SOLID STATE 

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FAMOUS NAME 

COLOR TV 

$499 

CASH 

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RIGHT DECISION 

WHEN BUYING OR 

SELLING A HOME 







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A SHY LITTLE SHE SAID, SHOO! 1 
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PROBLEMS FOR 1974- WITH 

STRAIGHT TALK' AND SERVICE 

Call ... 

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Insuranco - Real Estate 
19 Billings Road, N. Quincy 
479-7697 " ; 




■'■ """"f 



Thursday, January 10, 1974 Quincy Sun Page 13 

I.. I I I l l II II M l 1 I * I H H II I 



NORTH QUINCY 



297 On Atlantic Junior Honor Roll 



Atlantic Junior High 
School reports 297 students 
on the first-quarter honor 
roll. They are: 



HIGH HONORS 
Grade 7 

Michael W. Alcott 

Theresa M. Barkas 

Alicia K. Burns 

Ann T. Carroll 

Joan Cavanagh 

William E. Clapp 

Kevin Cobban 

Kathleen M. Connolly 

Michele B. Constantineau 

Michael J. Crowley 

Donna mae D'Angelo 

Cynthia A. Duggan 

Marie P. Flaherty 

Diane M. Graham 

Ellen J. Gratia ra 

Matthew Hemphill 

Joseph J. Kovalchik 

Kim M. Kowilcik 

Cheryl M. Lineman 

Amy Long 

Deborah J. Mathieson 

Patricia McKeogh 

Wendy A. McLean 

Karen F, Mclanson 

Elizabeth L. Murphy 

Asha K. Sherring 

:M\ K. Soddeck 

Gary L. Stack 

I rank N. Strauss 

Marilyn J. Tabak 

Thomas R. Vella 

Linda M. Wilkins 

Ann L, Woodward 

Mary J. Zakrewski 
HONORS 
Grade 7 

David S. Allman 

Cheryl A. Attridge 

Catherine M. Bent 

Patricia M. Brown 

Thomas P. Bulger 

Laurene M. Burke 

Diannc L. Burrows 

Eileen M. Butts 

Theresa A. Camillo 

Steven M. Cavanaugh 

Anne F. Clark 

John P. Conley 

Colleen J. Connors 

John Conroy 
Henry Corcoran 
Lynn S. Cordaro 
James E. Coughlin 
Joanne Coulouras 
Deborah A. Coutts 
Joseph Cox 
Michael F. Crowley 
Kathleen A. Daly 
Michael J. Dillon 
Anthony L. DiPiero 
Barbara J. Doherty 
Lynn A. Doherty 
Kathleen M. Doody 
Leo Doyle 
Jean M. Duddy 
John B. Dunn 
Maureen E. Dunn 
Alan J. Dyer 
Patrick T. Fnnis 
Sandra R. Fscudero 



Susan H. Estabrooks 
Margarheeta C. Fatseas 
Scott A. Fitzgerald 
James B. Flaherty 
Richard W. Forrest 
David M. Gallagher 
Valerie J. Grande 
David W. Hanlon 
William B. Harrow 
Deralla L. Hart 
Glenn J. Healy 
Donna M. Heffernan 
Charles M. Hill 
Beverly J. Josselyn 
Jean M. King 
Theodore K. Koberski 
Mark A. Leary 
Julie Lyons 
James F. Mackiewicz 
Christine M. MacLaughlin 
Carole A. MacPherson 
Michael F. Mariano 
Robert W. Matthes 
Timothy J. McCluskey 
Stephen P. McCormack 

Joseph W. McDonald 

John T. McFadden 
Robert M. McGrath 

Diane E. Mignosa 

William P. Murphy 

Madeline J. Naddaff 

James Nee 

Paul Nestor 

David E. Newton 

Nancy L. Nolan 

Bernadette O'Brien 

Karen M. O'Brien 

Marie Anne A. Ostby 

Paul J. Ouellette 

Susan P. Oxner 

Dorcen M. Pinkham 

Kathleen Player 

Sandra L. Pontes 

Lynda L. Riddle 

Geraldine Ridge 

Lydia Robinson 

Mark W. Rooney 

Lorraine M. Russell 

Debra L. Sanderson 

Jocelyn Santos 

Nancy E. Senter 

Nancy M. Shea 
Kathleen M. Shionis 
Michael S. Spinale 
Judy E. Stalker 
Fern D. Starr 
Mark J. Stokes 
Christopher J. Thompson 
Barbara A. Toland 
Carolyn J. Turner 
Lynda M. Tyler 
Joseph R. Waterhouse 
Gayle A. Zoia 

HIGH HONORS 
Grade 8 
Lori S. Baker 
Theresa L. Bangs 
Lorraine M. Behenna 
Margaret J. Butler 
Joseph D. Cahilr 
Donna M. Chiampa 




LUNCHEON 
SPECIALS 

AND 
SANDWICH 
SPECIALS FROM .99<* 




James L. Conboy 
Susan Cooper 
Karen M. Daly 
Robert H. Doyle 
Denise Duchainey 
Bernadette M. Feeney 
Kathryn M. Forrest 
Diana M. Hidalgo 
Anne F. Hogan 
Susan E. Ivey 
Elizabeth Johnson 
Marina Koutoukis 
Nancy A. Maloney 
Clare J. McDonald 
Bayani P. Montoya 
Francis Morreale 
Jean M. Moynihan 
Nadine L. Naddaff 

Adam N. Nagy 

James P. Nazzaro 

Ann M. O'Malley 

Eileen A. O'Sullivan 

Joni Marie Panaro 

Kyriaki [ Sandra | Pesiridis 

Karen P. Pike 

Cheryl Polom 

Robert A. Reed 

Donna M. Shaw 

Margaret R. Shea 

Maureen A. Sullivan 

Patricia A. Symonds 

Bruce G. Taymor 

Marisa Tortolini 
Carol A. White 

HONORS 
Grade 8 
Linda M. Adams 

Joshua W. Alberti 

Debra M. Alessi 

Debra P. Allen 

Stephen J. Anastas 

Gary L. Anderson 

Edwin J. Beck 

Rose Ann F. Bcfera 

Christine M. Burns 

Robert F. Burns 

Bridget E. Bush 

Anne E. Butler 

David L. Carr 

James W. Carroll 

Dorothy M. Caulfield 

Dorothy A. Cellini 

Russell W. Chisholm 

Joanne Cochrane 

Michael R. Colby 

Gail E. Colclough 

Patricia A. Collins 

Paul M. Collins 
Michael J. Colon 
Susan Condon 
Vicki L. Conley 
Stephen V. Cook 
John G. Cooney 
Susan E, Coronella 
Francis J. Costa 
David F. Cramond 
Cynthia A. Cummings 
Nancy DiBella 
Mark D. Dimho 
Ann M. Doll 
Margaret C. Doran 
Thomas A. Dow 
Russell S. Ela 
William M. Ennis 
Edward G. Evartscn 
Albert K. Fedcrico 
Donna M. Fennessey 
James A. Fitzpatrick 
Jane F. Fitzpatrick 
David Flyan 
Maureen E. Flynn 



Nora May Foley 
Susan M. Fournier 
Linda M. French 
Vincent Furlong 
Anne C. Gallagher 
Theodor Georgaklis 
Lisa Gethin 
Philip L. Golden 
Elizabeth M. Gori 
Christopher P. Gorman 
Kathleen M. Goslin 
Catherine C. Greene 
Deborah A. Grenier 

Maureen Griffin 
John P. Hagerty 
Lynda M. Hanna 
James C. Hanrahan 
Thomas F. Heavey 
Donna M. Jackson 
Sean W. Jago 
Ann Joyce 
Kerry A. Kennedy 
Patricia A. Largey 
James G. Larkin 
Diana L. Laurence 
Helena F. Lawlor 
Julie Long 
Craig P. Lowe 
John R. Lydon 
Margaret A. Lydon 
William F. MacDonald 
Maureen MacKay 
Charles A. MacMillan 
Cheryl L. Maffie 
David W. Marland 
Cheiie A. Martinelli 
Marie L. McCarthy 
Michael J. McCormack 
Robert J. McDonald 
Kevin J. McGue 
Colleen M. McGuire 
Thomas P. McKenna 
Maryanne McRae 
Clarisa M. Melton 
Mary R. Misite 
Tagumpay P. Montoya 
Linda M. Morin 
Kathleen T. Morrissey 
Dennis J. Morton 
Adam D. Mujica 
Kathleen A. Mullaney 
Barbara L. Murray 
Helen M. Nee 
Patricia A. O'Brien 
Dennis O'Keefe 
Claire C. O'Neil 
Debra Oshry 
Lawrence M. Ouellette 
Julie A. Palmer 
James R. Purtell 
Sandra Ring 
Mark S. Robinson 
Edward C. Rooney 
Dale Marie Ross 
Erenda M. Santos 
John R. Saville 
Michele A. Seltzer 
Rita M. Serrilla 
Mary T. Sheehan 
Colleen M. Simmons 
Robert F. Stevens 
Daniel S. Thompson 
Douglas L. Tillycr 
Karen M. Tower 
Linda A. Tuttle 
Corinne Volpe 
Brenda D. Welch 
Nancy A. Westgate 
Claire L. Wildes 
Alisa A. Zaffiro 
Gregory J. Zoia 



PLAZA 

RESTAURANT 



51 BILLINGS RD 

NORTH QUINCY 

FREE PARKING 
IN REAR 




MD Carnival Friday 
At Atlantic Church 



A winter carnival against 
muscular dystrophy will be held 
by youngsters in grades 4 



lUisterSUB 

64 Billings Rd 
North Quincy 479-9685 

[Opposite I amnion (jualit) Cleaners 

Joseph Buccini 
WHY BOTHER 
COOKING TODAY 
ENJOY A DELICIOUS 
HOT OR COLD 
SUBMARINE. SANDWICH 
TRY OUR 

EGGPLANT 
PARMIGIANA 



through 6 Friday from 3 to 6 
p.m. in the Atlantic 
Congregational Church Hall. 

Donations will be 99 cents. 

The music for dancing will be 
supplied by Fred Chetwynd, disc 
jockey. 




OPEN MON. TO SAT. 

10 A.M. TO II P.M. 
SUNDAY 2 P.M. TO 9 P.M. 



NEWSBOYS WANTED 
Here's a chance to earn extra 
money by building a Quincy 
Sun home delivery route. 

Telephone: 471-3100 



: ;■■ - ;■'■:■:. :■)■' ■ : :--\--'-- Xr-.'w^; ■'■:.■ ■V i^.i'.' viv. -:/'£•:: : 






Page 12 Quincy Sun Thursday, January 10, 1974 



Young Ideas 

Unedited selections from the writings 
of Quincy's elementary school children. 



WINTER 

Winter Cold , windy tumbling, 
skating, coasting tun and very 
exciting season 

By Trisha Doherty 
Wollaston School 

A CAN 01 PEAS 

Once upon a time there was a 
can of Peas No Body Bought 
him, Then one day someone did. 
He was so Happy. But then 
when the people tried to pick 
him up he gasped with fright. 
But they were only going to 
name him. His new name was 
Wilber. He liked the children 
very much. But. then one day 
they ate him for supper. There 
stomaches were full but his 
was'nt. It was empty and dry, no 
water or anything. They threw 
him away and he got filled again. 
This same thing went on and on, 
on. on. The End. 

Vicki Ann Price 

Wollaston School 

Grade 4 

THE RULER 

Once upon a time there was a 
ruler. It was up in heaven. It 
came down and measured 
Everything. He was a good ruler. 
He did everything right. It rode a 
round in its car. It ate a lot and 
went out too. 

Robert Flynn 

Wollaston School 

Grade 4 

A TOOTH BRUSH 

When I was a tooth brush I 
was getting a bath in tooth 
paste. When one of my bristles 
fell out. I was shocked. 1 went 
on and on until one day my last 
bristles fell out. My last pal 
threw me away. So I went to 
tooth brush heaven. 

Deirdre Simmons 

Wollaston School 

Grade 4 



SOUTH SHORE 
SEWING MACHINE CO. 

We Service All Makes Sewing 
Machines and Vacuum Cleaners 
665A Hancock St., Wollaston 
471-5982 



HOT CHOCOLATE HEAVEN? 

When I was hot chocolate, I 
was in a package. Some kid 
wanted some to drink. So he 
poured me in to a cup and put 
the water on the burner. The 
water boiled and he poured it all 
over me. I screamed but no one 
heard me. It was the end of me, 
All I remember is that he stirred 
me and drank me all up. I was 
dead. After thai he had a funeral 
for me, Then | said good-bye 
and went to hot Chocolate 
heaven. He cried and he cried. In 
a way I felt bad for him. Then 
he had another cup of hot 
chocolate? 

Janet O'Mara 

Wollaston School 

Grade 4 

A HAMMER 

I am a hammer. I hammer a 
lot. I sit in the cellar too. I bang 
and I bang. I bang things 
together too. I break things too. 
What would you do with me? 

Scott Price 

Wollaston School 

Grade 4 

THE DESK 

I am a desk. I like the person 
who sits on my chair. She is a 
girl, her name is Stacey. She is a 
very nice girl. She feeds me in 
the morning, in the afternoon, 
and at night. 

Maureen Monagle 

Wollaston School 

Grade 4 

I AM TOOTHEY 

I was born in a mouth. I get a 
rub down with a hard tooth 
brush. I hurts. Every day I get all 
dirty with food. Today I am in a 
sack, the toothfairy's sack that 
is! The End. 

Bridget Feeney 
Wollaston School 
Grade 4 
PAINT 

Once a can of paint died. He 

came alive and everybody was 

happy. Then it worked again. 

What a surprise it was. The End. 

Nicola Carbone 

Wollaston School 

Grade 4 




WOLLASTON 
CREDIT UNION 

PERSONAL & AUTO LOANS 
NO NOTICE SAVINGS ACCTS. 
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HOME IMPROVEMENTS 

ALL ACCOUNTS FULLY INSURED 
UNDER LAW BY MASS.C.U. 
SHARE INSURANCE CORP. 

651 HANCOCK ST., 
WOLLASTON 

773-3500 773-8600 

OPEN MON.-THURS. 9-8 TUES., WED., FRI.9-5 



ALLAN'S 

NEW YEAR SALE 

SPECIALS ON TAPE DECKS 
STEREO'S - RADIOS - TAPES 

OFF ALL 
% STEREOS 
OR CAR DECKS 

ALLAN'S TAPE & STEREO CENTER 

16 Bcale St. 

Wollaston 

Next to Wollaston Theatre 

OPEN: 10 to 6 Mon. Tues. Sat 

10to9Wed.Thurs.FrL 



WOLLASTON 



200-Unit Senior Complex 

Sargent Here Friday To Sign 
Agreements For Clay St. Project 



Gov. Francis Sargent is 
coming to Quincy Friday to sign 
the agreements that will clear 
the way for construction of the 
controversial $4.4 million Clay 
St. Senior Citizens Housing 
Project. 

The Governor will be 
welcomed at a noon luncheon at 
the Wollaston Golf Club and the 
signing ceremonies will be held 
at 1 p.m. at Fenno House, a 
senior citizens' facility at 540 
Hancock St., Wollaston. 

The contract to build the 
12-story, 200-unit apartment 
complex was finally awarded 
Dec. 20 after an eight-month- 
-long zoning dispute with 
abuttors and a brief controversy 
over bids for construction. 

Abuttors obtained a court 
injunction against the project 
while they challenged in court a 



Zoning Board of Appeals 
variance from a regulation that 
calls for one parking space per 
apartment unit. 

The appellate board's decision 
was based on the fact that the 
project would be located within 
walking distance of the 
Wollaston MBTA station and 
thus autos would not be a 
necessity for residents of the 
building. 

Legislation permitting the 
City Building Inspector, Alan 
Macdonald, to issue a building 
permit in spite of the injunction 
was filed by Sen. Arthur H. 
Tobin [D-Quincy] and passed in 
October, just before the deadline 
on federal financing expired. 

The project was originally 
figured to cost $4 million but 
inflation during the eight-month 
delay raised the price so much 
that the lowest bid obtained was 



$364,000 over that figure. 

Even after the contract was 
awarded, there were problems. 

The low bidder, DiLibero 
Brothers of Boston, backed out, 
saying that it would be unable to 
meet the terms of the contract. 

The second lowest bidder, 
James J. Welch Construction Co. 
of Salem, was awarded the 
contract after the State 
Department of Community 
Affairs ruled that the contract 
did not have to be readvertised 
for new bids. 

The Quincy Housing 
Authority claimed that calling 
for new bids would have boosted 
the cost even more since the 
whole complex would have had 
to be redesigned. 

The Housing Authority's 
waiting list for elderly housing 
has reached more than 1,500 
names. 



Delahunt Would Require Utilities 
To Give 10-Day Notice On Cut-Off s 



Rep. William D. Delahunt 
[D-Quincy] is co-sponsor of a 
bill that would require gas, 
electric and telephone 
companies,, to give delinquent 
customers 10 days notice before 
terminating services. 

The bill also provides that 
such notice be sent to the 
customer by certified mail and 
that Saturdays and Sundays be 
excluded from the 10-day grace 
period. 



"Under present law," said 
Delahunt, "critical gas, electric 
and telephone service can be 
terminated by a utility for 
non-payment or for various 
other reasons upon extremely 
short notice to the customer." 

Current law, he said, "permits 
a gas or electric company to 
send by regular mail a notice 
only three days prior to the time 
that the company intends to 
terminate service. 



"Termination of telephone 
service is unregulated by statute 
but the telephone companies 
have customarily . . . provided 
for extremely short notice of 
termination of telephone service. 

"Not only is it very difficult 
for a number of customers to 
raise enough money to pay a 
back bill on such short notice, 
but the notice itself sometimes 
goes astray because of the 
vagaries of the mails." 



Jewish Youth Enjoy Winter Vacation Program 



During the December school 
vacation, youths from Quincy 
and surrounding areas 
participated in three day-long 
programs sponsored by the 
South Area Jewish Community 
Center, 10 Merrymount Rd., 
Quincy. 



Forty elementary school age 
children took part in "Fun 
Day," including ice skating, 
games and films, and spent the 
day at the Stoneham Zoo. 

Youths from Canton, Sharon, 
Quincy, Randolph, Norwood 
and Westwood attended a 



Chanukah party at Grossman 
Camp in Westwood. The 
children were treated to a day of 
sports, games and latke cooking 
and eating, and saw a special 
production of the Chanukah 
Story by the Flapdoodle 
Puppets from Milford, N.H. 



Quincy Base For Kidney Pilot Fund Program 



Quincy has been designated as 
the base of operations for the 
first annual Kidney Foundation 
of Massachusetts, pilot 
door-to-door fund raising 
campaign, throughout the South 
Shore Area. 

Kidney Foundation official, 
Santa Fareri, said that Dean 



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CARS & ACCESSORIES 

TYCO H.0. TRAINS 

and Accessories 

DRUM SETS 
GUITARS 

Music Accessories 

MUSIC 
BOOKS 

Piano - Guitar 
Harmonica - Recorder 
All Organ - Chord Organ 

WOLLASTON 

MUSIC CENTER 
AND HOBBY SHOP 

27 Beale St. Wollaston 
Call 778tlt0 - — 



Comeau, president of the 
Kidney Foundation and the 
Board of Directors have given 
careful thought to the pilot 
program and believes the South 
Shore area is representative of 
communities throughout 
Massachusetts. 

Mrs. John T. Riccuiti, 
chairwoman in charge of the 
entire area will be assisted by 
Mrs. Francis X. Bellotti and Mrs. 



WOLLASTON 

Beale St. off Hancock St. 
QUINCY PR 3 1600 



JAN. 9TH THRU JAN. 15 



James R. Mclntyre. A steering 
committee in charge of 
volunteers will be chaired by 
Mrs. George Santry, chairwoman 
for the Kidney Foundation State 
Project with the Junior 
Federation of Women. 

The campaign will take place 
in March. 

Those wishing to serve as 
volunteers are asked ' to call 
261-1943. 




SHAMUS 

[P.G.] 7:30 P.M. 

GODSPELL 

A GREAT MUSICAL 
FOR ALL AGES 
[G.P.] 9:15 P.M. 



$1.00 ADMISSION AT 
ALL PERFORMANCES 



MUSIC LESSONS 

Professional Instruction 
DRUM PIANO GUITAR 
WOLLASTON MUSIC CENTER 
27 Beale St., Wollaston 
Call 773-5325 



* FLAGS * 

INDOOR OUTDOOR 
ACCESSORIES 



FLAGS MADE TO ORDER 

STATE FLAGS CHURCH FLAGS 

FLAGS OF ALL NATIONS 

EAGLE FLAG 
CO.,INC. 

147 Beach St., 472-8242 
. ■ -Wc4ta»tofh-Ma». 02170 



Chamber, Labor Dept. 

Sign $117,000 
Grant For 40 New Jobs 



Thursday, January 10, 1974 Quincy Sun Page 13 



A $1 17,000 contract between 
the South Shore Chamber of 
Commerce and the U.S. 
Department of Labor to fund 40 
new jobs has been entered into 
and formally signed. 

Signing for the Chamber of 
Commerce was President George 
Reardon, of President Chevrolet 
Inc., and for the U.S. Labor 
Department, Thomas Komarek, 
Manpower Division. The 
ceremony took place Monday at 
the Chamber's office, 36 Miller 
Stile Rd, Quincy. 

Congressman James A. Burke 
and Mayor Walter Hannon 
headed the guest list which 
included representatives from 
the National Alliance of 
Businessmen, Mass. Division of 
Employment Security, 
Community Action 
Organization, the Board of 
Directors of the Chamber and 
executives f r0 m participating 
business firms. 

The JOBS [Job Opportunities 
in the Business Sector) contract, 
designed with the assistance of 
the National Alliance of 
Businessmen, sets up a 
consortium of 1 1 South Shore 
business firms with the Chamber 
of Commerce acting as agent and 
administrator. 

Forty-one disadvantaged local 
residents ' will be hired and 
trained to fill skilled jobs. The 
federal government agrees to 
subsidize 50 per cent of the 
salaries during the training 
period, lasting from 4 to 10 
months, depending on the skill 
level, and 100 per cent of the 
training, educational and 
counseling costs. 

The Quincy Community 
Action Organization will assist 



ENERGY 
SAVING 

100% SOLID STATE 

"25" CONSOLE 

FAMOUS NAME 

COLOR TV 

$499 

CASH 

NESC0 

423 HANCOCK ST 

NORTH QUINCY 



the Chamber of Commerce in 
providing the counseling 
component of the contract as 
will the Quincy School 
Department in regards to 
job-related education. 

The Quincy Office of the 
Division of Employment 
Security is handling the 
recruitment and interviewing for 
the 41 jobs, ranging from light 
industry *to commercial 
enterprises of which the 
majority are in the 
Braintree-Hingham-Quincy area. 

Plans are already developing 
to make the JOBS Program a 
permanent fixture on the South 
Shore and the Chamber of 
Commerce is looking to its next 
contract. Job opportunities is 
one of the priorities of the 
Chamber of Commerce and this 
contract is one way the Chamber 
can partially realize its goal of 
full employment. 

Interested job applicants are 
urged to contact the South 
Shore Chamber of Commerce, 
36 Miller Stile Road, Quincy, or 
the Quincy Office, Department 
of Employment Security, 
Hancock Street, Quincy. 

Companies in the consortium: 
Quincy Adams Marine Basin, 
Inc., of Quincy; Wollaston 
Alloys of Braintree; Crogan 
Business Machines, Inc. of 
Quincy; President Chevrolet of 
Quincy; Miller Blueprint 
Company, Inc. of Quincy; Best 
Chevrolet of Ilingham;' South 
Shore National Bank of Quincy; 
Merriman, Inc. of Hingham: 
Helco Electric of Saugus [the 
jobs are in Weymouth); Auto 
Engineering South of Norwell; 
Native Footwear of Braintree. 



WE CAN HELP 
YOU MAKE THE 
RIGHT DECISION 
WHEN BUYING OR 
SELLING A HOME 




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Call ... 

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Insurance - Real Estate 
19 Billings Road, N. Quincy 
479-7697 v 



NORTH QUINCY 



i 



297 On Atlantic Junior Honor Roll 



Atlantic Junior High 
School reports 297 students 
on the first-quarter honor 
roll. They are: 



HIGH HONORS 
Grade 7 

Michael W. Alcott 

Theresa M. Barkas 

Alicia K. Burns 

Ann T. Carroll 

Joan Cavanagh 

William E. Clapp 

Kevin Cobban 

Kathleen M. Connolly 

Michele B. Constantineau 

Michael J. Crowley 

Donnamae D'Angelo 

Cynthia A. Duggan 

Marie P. Flaherty 

Diane M. Graham 

Ellen J. Granara 

Matthew Hemphill 

Joseph J. Kovalchik 

Kim M. Kowilcik 

Cheryl M. Lineman 

Amy Long 

Deborah J. Mathieson 

Patricia McKeogh 

Wendy A. McLean 

Karen F. Melanson 

Elizabeth L. Murphy 

Asha K. Sherring 

Ifk K. Soddeck 

Guy L. Stack 

Frank N. Strauss 

Marilyn J. Tabak 

Thomas R. Vella 

Linda M. Wilkins 

Ann L, Woodward 

Mary J. Zakrewski 
HONORS 
Grade 7 

David S. Allman 

Cheryl A. Attridge 

Catherine M. Bent 

Patricia M. Brown 

Thomas P. Bulger 

Laurene M. Burke 

Dianne L. Burrows 

Eileen M. Butts 

Theresa A. Camillo 

Steven M. Cavanaugh 

Anne F. Clark 

John P. Conley 

Colleen J. Connors 

John Conroy 
Henry Corcoran 
Lynn S. Cordaro 
James E. Coughlin 
Joanne Coulouras 
Deborah A. Coutts 
Joseph Cox 
Michael F. Crowley 
Kathleen A. Daly 
Michael J. Dillon 
Anthony L. DiPiero 
Barbara J. Doherty 
Lynn A. Doherty 
Kathleen M. Doody 
Leo Doyle 
Jean M. Duddy 
John B. Dunn 
Maureen E. Dunn 
Alan J. Dyer 
Patrick T. Ennis 
Sandra R. Escudero 



Susan H. Estabrooks 
Margarheeta C. Fatseas 
Scott A. Fitzgerald 
James B. Flaherty 
Richard W. Forrest 
David M. Gallagher 
Valerie J. Grande 
David W. Hanlon 
William B. Harrow 
Deralla L. Hart 
Glenn J. Healy 
Donna M. Heffernan 
Charles M. Hill 
Beverly J. Josselyn 
Jean M. King 
Theodore K. Koberski 
Mark A. Leary 
Julie Lyons 
James F. Mackiewicz 
Christine M. MacLaughlin 
Carole A. MacPherson 
Michael F. Mariano 
Robert W. Matthes 
Timothy J. McCluskey 
Stephen P. McCormack 
Joseph W. McDonald 
John T. McFadden 
Robert M. McGrath 
Diane E. Mignosa 
William P. Murphy 
Madeline J. Naddaff 
James Nee 
Paul Nestor 
David E. Newton 
Nancy L. Nolan 
Bernadette O'Brien 
Karen M. O'Brien 
Marie Anne A. Ostby 
Paul J. Ouellette 
Susan P. Oxner 
Dorcen M. Pinkham 
Kathleen Player 
Sandra L. Pontes 
Lynda L. Riddle 
Geraldine Ridge 
Lydia Robinson 
Mark W. Rooney 
Lorraine M. Russell 
Debra L. Sanderson 
Jocelyn Santos 
Nancy E. Senter 
Nancy M. Shea 
Kathleen M. Shionis 
Michael S. Spinale 
Judy E. Stalker 
Fern D. Starr 
Mark J. Stokes 
Christopher J. Thompson 
Barbara A. Toland 
Carolyn J. Turner 
Lynda M. Tyler 
Joseph R. Waterhouse 
Gayle A. Zoia 

HIGH HONORS 
Grade 8 
Lori S. Baker 
Theresa L. Bangs 
Lorraine M. Behenna 
Margaret J. Butler 
Joseph D. Cahilr 
Donna M. Chiampa 




LUNCHEON 
SPECIALS 

AND 
SANDWICH 
SPECIALS FROM .99<* 







James L. Conboy 
Susan Cooper 
Karen M. Daly 
Robert H. Doyle 
Denise Duchainey 
Bernadette M. Feeney 
Kathryn M. Forrest 
Diana M. Hidalgo 
Anne F. Hogan 
Susan E. Ivey 
Elizabeth Johnson 
Marina Koutoukis 
Nancy A. Maloney 
Clare J. McDonald 
Bayani P. Montoya 
Francis Morreale 

Jean M. Moynihan 

Nadine L. Naddaff 

Adam N. Nagy 

James P. Nazzaro 

Ann M. O'Malley 

Eileen A. O'Sullivan 

Joni Marie Panaro 

Kyriaki [ Sandra | Pesiridis 

Karen P. Pike 

Cheryl Polom 

Robert A. Reed 

Donna M. Shaw 

Margaret R. Shea 

Maureen A. Sullivan 

Patricia A. Symonds 

Bruce G. Taymor 

Marisa Tortolini 
Carol A. White 

HONORS 

Grade 8 
Linda If. Adams 

Joshua W. Albcrti 

Debra M. Alessi 

Debra P. Allen 

Stephen J. Anastas 

Gary L. Anderson 

Edwin J. Beck 

Rose Ann F. Befera 

Christine M. Burns 

Robert F. Burns 

Bridget E, Bush 

Anne E. Butler 

David L. Carr 

James W. Carroll 

Dorothy M. Caulfield 

Dorothy A. Cellini 

Russell W. Chisholm 

Joanne Cochrane 

Michael R. Colby 

Gail E. Colclough 

Patricia A. Collins 

Paul M. Collins 
Michael J. Colon 
Susan Condon 
Vicki L. Conley 
Stephen V. Cook 
John G. Cooney 
Susan E. Coronella 
Francis J.Costa 
David F. Cramond 
Cynthia A. Cummings 
Nancy Di Bella 
Mark D. Dimho 
Ann M. Doll 
Margaret C. Doran 
Thomas A. Dow 
Russell S. Ela 
William M. Ennis 
Edward G. Evansen 
Albert K. Fedcrieo 
Donna M. F ennessey 
James A. Fitzpatrick 
Jane F. Fitzpatrick 
David ITynn 
Maureen E. Flynn 



Nora May Foley 
Susan M. Fournier 
Linda M. French 
Vincent Furlong 
Anne C. Gallagher 
Theodor Georgaklis 
Lisa Gethin 
Philip L. Golden 
Elizabeth M. Gori 
Christopher P. Gorman 
Kathleen M. Goslin 
Catherine C. Greene 
Deborah A. Grenier 

Maureen Griffin 
John P. Hagerty 
Lynda M. Hanna 
James C. Hanrahan 
Thomas F. Heavey 
Donna M. Jackson 
Sean W. Jago 
Ann Joyce 
Kerry A. Kennedy 
Patricia A. Largey 
James G. Larkin 
Diana L. Laurence 
Helena F. Lawlor 
Julie Long 
Craig P. Lowe 
John R. Lydon 
Margaret A. Lydon 
William F. MacDonald 
Maureen MacKay 
Charles A. MacMillan 
Cheryl L. Maffie 
David W. Marland 
Cherie A. Martinelli 
Marie L. McCarthy 
Michael J. McCormack 
Robert J. McDonald 
Kevin J. McGue 
Colleen M. McGuire 
Thomas P. McKenna 
Maryanne McRae 
Clarisa M. Melton 
Mary R. Misite 
Tagumpay P. Montoya 
Linda M. Morin 
Kathleen T. Morrissey 
Dennis J. Morton 
Adam D. Mujica 
Kathleen A. Mullaney 
Barbara L. Murray 
Helen M. Nee 
Patricia A. O'Brien 
Dennis O'Keefe 
Claire C. O'Neil 
Debra Oshry 
Lawrence M. Ouellette 
Julie A. Palmer 
James R. Purtell 
Sandra Ring 
Mark S. Robinson 
Edward C. Rooney 
Dale Marie Ross 
Erenda M. Santos 
John R. Saville 
Michele A. Seltzer 
Rita M. Serrilla 
Mary T. Sheehan 
Colleen M. Simmons 
Robert F. Stevens 
Daniel S. Thompson 
Douglas L. Tillyer 
Karen M. Tower 
Linda A. Tut tie 
Corinne Volpe 
Brenda D. Welch 
Nancy A. Westeate 
Claire L. Wildes 
Alisa A. Zaffiro 
Gregory J. Zoia 



MD Carnival Friday 
At Atlantic Church 



PLAZA 

RESTAURANT 



r> 



51 BILLINGS RD 
NORTH QUINCY 

FREE PARKING 
IN REAR 




A winter carnival against 
muscular dystrophy will be held 
by youngsters in grades 4 

rt|isterSUB 

64 Billings Rd 
North Quincy 479-9685 
|Opposiio | ashionQuuiit) (leanvrsl 

Joseph Buccini 
WHY BOTHER 
COOKING TODAY 
ENJOY A DELICIOUS 
HOT OR COLD 
SUBMARINE SANDWICH 
TRY OUR 

EGGPLANT 

PARMIGIANA 



through 6 Friday from 3 to 6 
p.m. in the Atlantic 
Congregational Church Hall. 

Donations will be 99 cents. 

The music for dancing will be 
supplied by Fred Chetwynd, disc 
jockey. 




OPEN MON. TO SAT. 

10A.M.T6UP.M. 

SUNDAY 1P.M. TO 9 P.M. 



NEWSBOYS WANTED 
Here's a chance to earn extra 
money by building a Quincy 
Sun home delivery route. 

Telephone: 471-3100 



•.' : : »'W -• f v£^^h~ 



Page UQuincy Sun Thursday, January 10, 1974 




L 



Thursday, January 10, 1974 Quincy Sun Page 15 




:•■*• 



4 » * IN 



*•/...• £-\* '; *:..#• •* * ••..• ¥ *v . * 



Page 16 Quincy Sun Thursday, January 10, 1974 



James Brown Named Executive V.P.; 
13 Others Promoted At Hancock Bank 



The Board of Directors of 
Hancock Bank at its year-end 
meeting voted promotions to 14 
of its officers, highest of which 
was James M. Brown, Cohasset, 
to Executive Vice President. 

Announcement was made by 
William E. Kelley, President. 

Advanced to senior vice 
presidents were: William 
O'Connell, Duxbury; Henry F, 
Larochelle, Norfolk and Charles 
F. Sullivan, Scituate, 

Named vice presidents were: 
John H. Cunningham, Jr., 
Stoughton; William J. Griffin, 
East Bridgewater; Cornelius J. 
Harvey, North Easton and 
Salvatore J. Spinosa, Somerville. 

Elected assistant vice 
presidents were: Douglas 
Critchfield, Scituate; John A. 
Farmer, Quincy; Bruce D. 
Sutcliffe, Wrentham; Miss Susan 
Murdoch, Weymouth and 
Timothy H. Smith, Scituate. 

Ernest W. Wilbur, Plymouth 
was elevated to assistant 
treasurer. 





JOHN H. CUNNINGHAM JR. 



JOHN A. FARMER 



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Our rates may allow you to Rent a car 
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You get a clean car with every rental' 

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479-4098 



Business News 



Mary Reilly Elected 
Colonial Federal V.P. 



Miss Mary L. Reilly has been 
elected vice-president of the 
Colonial Federal Savings and 
Loan Association of Quincy, 
announces President Philip J. 
Lawrence. 

Miss Reilly who had been 
treasurer since 1968, is only the 
' fourth woman in Massachusetts 
to become vice-president of a 
federal loan association. She has 
been with the Association since 
1945. 

As vice-president, Miss Reilly 
will be in charge of 
administration of the 
Association's operations. 

In announcing Miss Reilly's 
election by the Board of 
Directors, Mr. Lawrence said: 

"We are particularly pleased 
to announce this promotion 
because not only does it 
recognize outstanding merit, it 
also recognizes advancement 
within the organization. 

"Miss Reilly's first duties with 
this Association were as a teller. 
She has served in various 
capacities since that time, all 
within this Association, giving 
her broad arid comprehensive 
experience in administration of 
operations." 

Miss Reilly attended 
Bridgewater Teachers College 
and Bentley College. She is a 
graduate of Weaver Course of 
Real Estate at Burdett College, 
the School of Executive 
Development of Savings and 
Loans at the University of 
Connecticut and the Graduate 
School of Savings and Loans at 
the University of Indiana. 

A resident of Randolph, she is 
a town meeting member there, a 
member of the National Society 
of Controllers and Financial 
Officers and the Halifax Country 
Club. 

The Colonial Federal Savings 
and Loan Association was 
incorporated in 1889 as the 
Wollaston Co-operative Bank. In 
1937, it was converted to a 
Federal charter and became the 
Wollaston Federal Savings and 




MARY REILLY 

Loan Association. 

On Jan. 2, 1971, the name 
was changed to the Colonial 
Federal Savings and Loan 
Association of Quincy. 

Present assets are $36 million, 
and show a $7 million growth in 
the last three years. 

The home office is located at 
15 Beach St., Wollaston. Branch 
offices are now at 802 South 
Franklin St., Holbrook and at 
Cranberry Plaza, East Wareham. 

"Colonial Federal has been 
experiencing an aggressive 
growth program over the last 
three years," noted Mr. 
Lawrence. "During that time, 
two new branches have been 
established and further 
expansion is contemplated. 

"As the Association has 
grown, it has become apparent 
that more operational control is 
required. Miss Reilly's 
appointment is a recognition not 
only of her talent, but also of 
the greater administrative 
demands that have been placed 
on this Association. 

"Although we are growing 
and expanding, it is our sincere 
desire to retain the personalized 
neighborhood type service which 
has been a trademark over the 
years. Every effort will be made 
to continue that type of service 
which we deem a valuable and 
vanishing commodity." 



Vincent Nobile Reappointed Notary 



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Thursday, January 10, 1974 Quincy Sun Page 17 

Have To Live With Their Motives,' Says Sheets 



[Cont'd from Page 1] 



"1 believe, for the benefit of 
the people in Ward 4, it would 
be unwise to begin my tenure of 
office under a pall of legal 
harassment. 

"The will of the people to me 
is clear. My pathway to service 
must be equally clear. In no 
sense must the integrity of the 
law be abused; but in no sense 
must the law be used to 
prostitute the will of the people. 

"And above all, to those 100 
young people, who by long 
hours of hard campaigning, have 
experienced a renewal of faith 
and hope in the American 
people and our system of 
government, let me say even this 
experience of disappointment 
can, in the final analysis, add 
steel to the courage or" your new 
convictions and temper your 
new understanding with greater 
wisdom." 

The statement was received 
with loud applause, including a 
standing ovation from about a 
dozen young people. 

The identities of the 10 
taxpayers who are challenging 
Sheets were a closely guarded 
secret early this week. Attorney 
Cormack was not available for 
comment. Kaufman and Sheets 
said they were unable to find 
out either. 

"Actually, it doesn't make 
much difference to me who they 
are," Sheets told The Sun. 

"If they are from my ward 1 
want to be able to serve them as 
well as their neighbors. They are 



within their rights doing this. I 
don't know what their motives 
are but they have to live with 
them. I have to live with my 
reactions to their motives. 

"1 feel 1 have to go into office 
with a positive attitude. We have 
to take away the cynicism and 
negativism that surrounds public 
office. We have to change 
attitudes before we can change 
directions. We want to go in 
with a positive altitude." 

The threat of the suit was 
contained in a letter from 
Cormack to City Solicitor 
Richard McCormick, dated Dec. 
20, pointing out that receiving 
pay for two city jobs was a 
violation of the city charter. 

Said Kaufman: 

"We told McCormick that Jim 
would serve on the City Council 
without pay until a court could 
make a ruling and we asked 
McCormick to include that in his 
reply to Cormack. 

"The City Solicitor called us 
Saturday and told us Cormack 
said he would seek an injunction 
against Jim." 

Sheets was elected with the 
campaign help of scores of 
students and young people. 

"The campaign really started 
late in the summer under a tree 
on the library lawn," said 
Kaufman. "Jim was sitting there 




LEFT OUT -- City Councillor-elect James A. Sheets, whose right to sit on the Council was challenged by 
a group of taxpayers, remains seated while Councillors Joseph J. LaRaia, Clifford Marshall and Leo J. 
Kelly [left to right] take the oath of office. 

[Quincy Sun Photo by Laban Whittaker] 



with a bunch of kids talking 
politics. 

"Some of the kids doubted 
that the system works. Jim told 
them that it does work and they 
can change it if they want. They 
said. Trove it!' And that started 
the campaign. 

Sheets said he explained the 
situation to his young supporters 
at a meeting Sunday and "at 
first they were despondent. 
They felt let down. 



"We started out with the 
feeling that we could run against 
the system and win. In spite of 
the fact that we were underdogs 
in both the primary and the 
election, we did win. 

"There was great elation 
among the young people. They 
felt that in spite of what they 
heard, the system was 
responsive. And now they find 
this challenge levied. 

"But the spark is back in their 



eyes. 

"One of them said to me, 'We 
learned to believe there was 
justice in the elective system. 
Now we'll see if there is justice 
in the courts. We are not giving 
up.' 

"This is a very crucial issue. 
Young people in Quincy and 
many elsewhere are watching 
what happens. It has gone 
beyond my cellar headquarters 
on Furnace Brook Parkway." 



John Murray Named Quincy Bicentennial Coordinator 



Mayor Walter J. Hannon 
announces that John E. Murray 
of 25 Morton St., Quincy, has 
been hired as the city's 
Coordinator of Bicentennial 
Activities. 

The $14,000 position, will be 
funded by a grant from the 
Massachusetts Bicentennial 
Commission. The Mayor 
expressed his appreciation to 
Senator Arthur Tobin and 
Senator Chester Atkins for their 
assistance in obtaining the grant. 

The Mayor noted the City's 
Bicentennial Committee has 
begun to develop and plan a 
program for the approaching 
200th anniversary celebration. It 
will be Murray's responsibility to 
develop, implement and monitor 
the progress of all Bicentennial 
related projects, to seek sources 
of funding, and to generate 
community support and 
involvement. 

"The success of our 
Bicentennial program will 
require much local energy, 
talent, and cooperation. We 
want to encourage the 
participation of all our 
residents," Hannon said. 

Murray will also be 'working 
with Bicentennial groups in 
other communities and with 
state, county, and federal 
agencies concerned with 
Bicentennial projects. Contacts 
have already been made with the 
Mass. Bicentennial Commission, 
Norfolk County Development 
and Tourist Council, and the 
American Revolutionary 
Bicentennial Committee. 



The Mayor indicated that an 
application has recently been 
made to the American 
Revolutionary Bicentennial 
Committee to have Quincy 
designated as an official 
Bicentennial Community. 

Murray, who will begin work 
Jan. 15, has been Assistant Vice 
President of the South Shore 
National Bank since 1971. For 
nine months, he worked as 
Executive Director of the 
Quincy Center Business and 
Professional Association. After 
an intensive review of 70 
applicants, Murray "was chosen 
for his ability to initiate and 
direct programs and for his 
community-related experience," 
Mayor Hannon said. 

Murray sees the protection, 
restoration, and promotion of 
the City's historic resources as a 
major goal of the Bicentennial. 

"We are the only city in the 
country to have the birthplaces 
and home of two Presidents," he 
said. "We have the First 
Commercial Railway; the 
Hancock Cemetery; the Dorothy 
Quincy Homesteau, the United 
First Parish Church, in which 
our two Presidents are buried; 
the Adams Academy, built on 
the site of John Hancock's 
Birthplace; the Josiah Quincy 
Homestead and many other sites 
of historic significance. Yet 
these sites have not received the 
protection nor recognition that 
their significance deserves." 

"The Bicentennial gives us the 
opportunity to make a lasting 
contribution to the City of 
Quincy. The Bicentennial can 



benefit our tourist industry, but 
it ran do much more-it can 
create an identity, develop pride, 
and act as a catalyst to get many 
things, which are long overdue, 
done." 

Among the plans being 
discussed by the Bicentennial 
Committee is an improved 
tourist information network. 
The Committee is proposing that 



a Tourist Information Center be 
located at the new Mclntyre 
Mall. It has also begun meeting 
with the MBTA to develop ways 
of encouraging visitors to use the 
transit line. The Committee is 
also working with the MBTA to 
establish a minibus service from 
the Mclntyre Mall around to the 
various sites in the City. A new 
system of directional signs to 



Cemetery Probe To Continue 



[Cont'd from Page 1 1 

LaRaia also insisted that the 
probe be continued by the new 
council to give some cemetery 
department employees who 
failed to show up at previous 
meetings a chance to testify. 

"And there were two or three 
members of the board of 
managers we have not heard 
from as yet, including the 
chairman," he said. "I think an 
end to the committee would be 
a little hasty at this point." 

Tobin said he was 
"disappointed that Mr. LaRaia 
had tabled an amendment that 
would have made the oversight 
committee a committee of the 
council as a whole so that all 
nine councillors could take part 
in the investigation." 



"But", he added, "1 respect 
his motion. It was perfectly 
proper since the order was 
coming in for the first time." 

Tobin said he has asked new 
chairman Quinn to obtain from 
Graham all documents 
pertaining to the case and to see 
that all new members of the 
committee receive copies of 
previous testimony. 

"Then," said Tobin, "I want 
Mr. Quinn to sit down with Mr. 
LaRaia and see if he has any 
evidence of wrong-doing or if we 
are going to spend our time 
looking for missing bushes in the 
cemetery." 



help visitors find their way 
around the City is also proposed. 
The Committee is also 
concerned with discovering ways 
to restore and protect our 
historical assets. The 
establishment of a Council of 
Historic Sites which will 
coordinate activities and hours 
of operation at historic locations 
is proposed. 

Dr. Quinn 

Hospital Staff 
President 

Harlan L. Paine, Director of 
Quincy City Hospital, announces 
the election of Dr. Harold J. 
Quinn of 1261 Furnace Brook 
Parkway, Quincy, as President of 
the Medical Staff. 

Dr. Quinn succeeds Dr. 
William P. Ridder, who has been 
president since June, 1972. 

Dr. Isadore Schwartz was 
elected vice-president, Dr. 
Melvin H. Zonis was elected 
secretary, and Dr. Prasanta K. 
Mitra was elected treasurer. 



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Page 18 Quincy Sun Thursday, January 10, 1974 



Moore, Andrews Hat Tricks 
Pace Bantam B's, 17-0 



Jimmy Moore and John 
Andrews fired three goal hat 
tricks and 13 other skaters 
figured in the scoring Saturday 
as the Quincy Bantam "B" team 
walloped Holbrook, 1 7-0, in Bay 
Colony Hockey Association 
action. 

Goalies Kevin Cotter and 
Daryl DiCristofaro divided their 
seventh shutout of the season. 

Moore also had three assists 



and Andrews two while Jim 
McConville added four assists 
and John Fitzgerald two goals 
and three assists in the rout that 
ran Quincy's record to 10 wins 
and two losses. 

Other scorers were Mark 
Paolucci, two goals; Rick Carnali 
and Dave Peters, a goal and two 
assists each; John Norton and 
Mark Kelly, a goal and an assist 
apiece. 



Jim Fitzpatrick, two assists; 
Dave Lewis, Jeff Gavin and Mike 
Wilson, each a goal; and Paul 
Cooney and Mike Marks, an 
assist apiece. 

In an exhibition contest 
Thursday [Dec. 13], Quincy 
bowed to Westwood, 3-2, with 
Cooney and Carnali getting the 
goals and Peters and Jim Triglia 
the assists. 



• Pee Wee House 



Davis Wins 5th In Row 
To Lead League 



In the Pee Wee House League 
Davis Insurance won its fifth in a 
row, edging Quincy Teachers, 
5-4, to lead the league with a 
7-1-0 record. 

Goals for Davis were scored 
by Fran Straughn with two, Jeff 
Gosselin, Bob Molloy and fcddie 
Powers with Tommy Hannon 
having two assists. Bill Joyce, 
John McKay and the league's 
leading scorer, John Lyons, one 
apiece. 

Kevin Cobban scored twice 
for the teachers with John 
Livingstone and Steve 



Shoemaker having the other 
goals and Mark Walsh having two 
assists, Tommy Mullan, 
Livingstone and Scott Brennan 
one apiece. 

Wollaston Theatre blanked 
UCT, 2-0, on goals by Mike 
McSweeney and Dennis 
Harrington. Jackie Quigg, Bob 
Monahan and Jim Sayers had 
assists and Mike Allan played an 
outstanding game in goal. 

Morrisette defeated 
Keohane's, 6-4, as Jeff Taylor 
had two goals. John Urbanus, 
Tom McHugh, Jay Collins and 



Billy Allen also scored for 
Morrisette while Allen and Mike 
Edwards had two assists each, 
Jay Collings, Mike Whalen, Tom 
McHugh and Bob McHugh one 
each. John Newcomb, Chuck 
Chevalier, and Bud Caggiano 
with assists going to John 
Furely, Bernie Van Tassel and 
Chevalier. 

Harold Club shut out Team 
Quincy, 3-0, with Dick 
Newcomb having two goals and 
Bob Thomas the other. Jim 
Rooney and Paul Graham had 
assists. 



McKay Paces Blue Team To 3-1 Win 



Al McKay's two goals paced 
the Blue team to a 3-1 victory 
over the Red team in Executive 
Hockey League action last week 
at the Quincy Youth Arena and 
gave the Blues a three-point lead 
in the pennant race. 

Len Picot got the other Blue 
goal with assists going to Bob 
Craig [21, Dave Hickey, Kevin 
White, Dave Towle and Bob 
Hayes. 

GIRLS JACKET FITTINGS 

TONIGHT 

Fittings for jackets for the 
girls in the Quincy Youth 
Hockey Association will be held 
tonight (Thursday] at 6:45 for 
any girl interested. 



Dick Reinhardt scored lone 
goal for the second place Red 
team, assisted by Jack Hurley 
and Ralph Freeman. 

The Gold team barely 
squeezed by the cellar-dwelling 
Green team, 3-2, on goals by Art 
Boyle, Tom Roberts and Joe 
Ryan. 

Bill Flanders had two assists 
and Ryan, Roberts, Fran Whalen 
and Joe Cunniff had one each. 



Buckie Zanardelli 


and Joe 


Chase each scored 


unassisted 


goals for the Greens. 




The Standings: 




W L T Pts. 


For Agst 


Blue 9 4 3 21 


59 46 


Red 7 5 4 18 


55 55 


Gold '763 17 


62 59 


Green 4 12 8 


46 62 



McHugh In Hat Trick 
As Midget A's Tie 




Jackie McHugh' fired three 
goals and assisted on another to 
lead the Quincy Midget "A" 
team to a 4-4 tie with Avon in a 
Bay Colony Hockey Association 



game Monday [Jan. 7) . 

Mike McAuley had a goal and 
two assists and Joe McConville 
had an assist. 



Squirt B's Bow, 4-2 



The Quincy Squirt "B" team 
bowed to Weymouth, 4-2, last 
week despite goals by Danny 
Boyle and Richie Stevens. 

Boyle also had an assist and 



Mike McNiece had two in the 
Quincy team's second Bay 
Colony Hockey Association loss 
of the season. 



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Sports Section 

• Squirt House 

Cullen's Hat Trick 
Leads Nardone, 4-1 



Mike Cullen's hat trick 
provided the margin as Nardone 
Aluminum whipped Ryes Meat 
Supply, 4-1, to remain in first 
place in the Squirt House 
League. 

Bob Fair had the fourth goal 
with John Lyons getting two 
assists and Dave Doherty and 
Todd McGregor one each. 

Mclnnins Contractor 
remained a point behind with an 
8-3 victory over winless Hannon 
Tire as Tony Chiochio came up 
with three goals and an assist. 

Dave Hickey and Mitch 
Mclnnis had two goals each and 
Paul Reinhardt had one. 

Clcn Collings and Mike 



Chiochio each had a pair of 
assists and Hickey and Joe 
Livingstone had one apiece. 

Mahar Plumbing blanked 
McCann Steel. 4-0, with Ed 
Doherty, Keith Blaney, Ted 
Duggan and Steve Igo getting the 
goals « and Rich McCarthy, 
Doherty and Igo credited with 
assists. 

Howard Back Realty and Dee 
Dee's fought to a 2-2 tie. 

Steve Healy and Dan Holland 
scored for Howard Back, assisted 
by Paul Healy and Mark Riley. 
Paul Burke and Dave DiCarlo got 
Dee Dee's goals with an assist to 
Rich Durham. 



Neville Leads 
Midget B's Over Avon 



Steve Neville collected the 
three-goal hat trick and assisted 
on two other scores as the 
Quincy Midget "B" team 
romped over Avon, 9-4, in a Bay 
Colony Hockey Association 
game. 

Mike Conti's two goals paced 
the Quincy team to its 13th 
consecutive victory by a 6-1 
count over Canton Thursday 
[Dec. 13.) 

Other scorers in the Avon 
game were: 

Bud Connally, two goals and 
an assist; Joey McConville, a goal 
and two assists; Larry Curtis, a 
goal and an assist; Dennis 
Bertoni and Paul Connally, a 
goal apiece; and Jackie Powers 
and Jeff Murphy, one assist 
each. 

Neville and Joe Pisterino each 
had a goal and an assist in the 
Canton game; Curtis and Pat 



McAuliffe also had goals; and 
McConville and Rick Butts had 
assists. 

MIDGET B SCORING 

G A Pts. 



Steve Neville 


24 


23 


47 


Larry Curtis 


22 


11 


33 


Mike Conti 


19 


10 


29 


Joey 

McConville 


9 


18 


27 


Jackie Powers 


11 


15 


26 


Dennis Berton 


i 8 


10 


18 


Bud 








Connally 
Pat 


10 


6 


16 


McAuliffe 


9 


5 


14 


Larry 
Pimental 


8 


5 


13 


Jeff Murphy 
Paul 


3 


7' 


10 


Connally 
Joe Pistorino 


3 

i 

m 


1 
2 


4 
4 


Rick Butts 





1 


1 



Tie Snaps Squirt A's Streak 



The Quincy Squirt "A" 
team's winning streak was 
snapped at eight games Sunday 
when Holbrook came up with a 
3-3 tie in a Bay Colony Hockey 
Association contest. 

Joey Rathgeb and Chuckie 
Marshall each had a goal and an 
assist for Quincy while Robbie 
Zanardelli had a pair of assists. 

Bobby Beniers got the third 
goal and Mike Doherty also had 
an assist. 

Beniers also contributed a 



goal and an assist as Quincy tied 
Wellesley, 4-4, in a non-league 
encounter. 

Neil Shea, Kevin Craig and 
Rathgeb had goals and Doherty 
and Zanardelli chipped in with 
assists. 

At the halfway mark in the 
Bay Colony season, the Quincy 
Squirts have a record of 1 1 wins, 
one loss and two ties; and goalie 
Kenny Mann has a goals against 
average of 1 .7 per game. 



Reardon's Hat Trick 
Sparks Mite A's, 5-1 



Rick Reardon's hat trick led 
the Quincy Mite "A" team to a 
5-1 victory over the Adams Club 
of South Boston in Bay Colony 
Hockey Association action 
Saturday [Jan. 5). 



Tommy Murphy and Dwayne 
Wilcoxen had the other goals, 
Dave Allen had two assists and 
Kevin Tenney and Paul Egan one 
each. 




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•Quincy Youth Hockey 

S.S. TV, Trucks, 

Blackwood, Sun, 
Johnson In Wins 



Thursday, January 10, 1974 Quincy Sun Page 19 



In the Bantam House League 
South Shore TV defeated Burgin 
Platner, 5-1, with Ed DiRamio, 
Jeff Harrison, Mike Bondarick, 
John Marsters and Jack 
Campbell scoring for South 
Shore and Marsters, Hugh 
McDermott and John Dunn 
assisting. John Rafferty scored 
for Burgin. 

Trucks walloped Bask in 
Robbins, 5-0, for its sixth win in 
a row after an opening day loss. 
Pete Cassidy scored twice and 
Billy Doherty, Paul O'Brian^nd 
Danny Higgins once each. 
O'Brian, Doherty and Higgins 
had assists. 

Blackwood Pharmacy 
remained undefeated [5-0-2] as 
it tied Doran and Harrington, 
1-1. Pat Cummings scored for 
Blackwood with Ron Mariano 



LEADING SCORERS 



Mark Ricciardi. 

Johnson 
Paul O'Brian, Trucks 
Pete Cassidy, Trucks 
Paul K. Barry, Trucks 
Len Picot. Noonan 
Pete Plant, Burgin 

Platner 
Jim Frye, Baskin 

Robbins 
Ken Kustka, Noonan 
John Cotter, Burgin 

Platner 
Arthur Bertoni, 

Blackwood 
Gary Trenholm, Sun 
Mike Bondarick, 

So. Shore J V 
Ronan Storer, Johnson 
Dick Boyle. Sun 
Mike Van Tassell, 

Baskin Robbins 
Jim Daly, Johnson 
Tommy Koelsch, 

Johnson 
Mike Marella, Baskin 

Robbins 
Jim Constas, Trucks 



G A Pts. 



assisting. Bill Morrison scored 
for Doran. 

Johnson Motor topped 
Noonan Press, 6-1, as Mark 
Riccari, the league's leading 
scorer with 12 points, scoring 
three goals. Bill Ridge, John Fair 
and Ronan Storer had the other 
goals for the winners with 
Tommy Koelsch having two 
assists. Ken Johnston, Fair, Jay 
Daly, Riccari and Mike Collings 
one each. Scott Gosselin scored 
for Noonan with Paul Vallantine 
assisting. 

Quincy Sun walloped Bersani, 
8-0, with Paul Guadinno starring 
in goal. Richard Boyle had four 
goals, Gary Trenhold three and 
Bob Kenney one. Ed Murphy 
had three assists, Kenney, Bob 
Burns, Doug McDonald, Boyle 
and Paul Flanders one apiece. 

BANTAM HOUSE LEAGUE 
STANDINGS 



10 
6 
9 



2 12 
5 1 1 

1 10 

2 10 
2 10 



W 



8 

6 4 10 



4 9 

4 8 



1 7 8 



2 7 
2 7 



Trucks of Quincy 6 
Blackwood 

Pharmacy 
Johnson Motor 

Parts 
Noonan Press 
Burgin Platner 
Quincy Sun 
Doran & 

Horrigan 
Baskin Robbins 
South Shore TV 
Bersani 

Brothers 



Pts. 

12 



5 2 i: 



7 



9 
9 
8 
6 

5 
5 
4 





7 
7 
7 

7 
7 



2 5 7 



MITE AS EDGED, 10 

Despite a standout 
performance in the nets by 
goalie Frankie Seymour, the 
Quincy Mite "A" team bowed to 
first place Duxbury, 1-0, in Bay 
Colony Hockey Association 
action. It was Quincy's second 
loss to Duxbury by a one goal 
margin this season. 



Eileen Marr 

Hat Trick 

Leads Orange 

Eileen Marr had the three-goal 
hat trick as the Orange team 
defeated the Green team, 6-2, in 
a Girls' House League game at 
the Quincy Youth Arena. 

Terry Flynn had two goals 
and an assist, Terry Fitzgerald 
had one goal and Jean Kelly and 
Lisa Norling each had an assist. 

Noreen Guest and Cheryl 
Walsh had a goal apiece for the 
Green team with Judy Phipps 
getting two assists. 




PAUL CONALLY [left], goes for the puck as Jeff Murphy strives to get himself in the open during the 
Quincy-Nashwaakis, N.BL, Midget "B" hockey game Sunday at Quincy Youth Hockey Arena. The 
Midgets split weekend games, Quincy winning, 4-3, and losing, 7-4. 

'•'■. [Quincy Sun Photo by Laban Whittaker] 

• Midget House 

Tiffany, Police, Suburban Win 



1? 

Ralph . Richards and Larry 
Ready netted two goals each and 
Richards added an assist, to lead 
Tiffany Realty to a 6.-3 victory 
over Cox Rambler in Midgcrt 
House League play last week. 

Bob Fitzpatrick and. Kevin 
Murphy had the other goals for 
Tiffany while Mark Burke^ Tom 
Morris and Murphy alsb got 
assists. -.'; •'■'•'. 

Jerry McGrath with two and 



Dan Perdios with one did the 
Cox Rambler scoring, assisted by 
Frank Shea and Ed Martin. 

Mike Griffin and Jerry Cronin 
were high scorers with a goal and 
an assist each as the Police 
Department shutout the Fire 
Department 5-0. 

Mark Walsh, Joe Carty and 
Bob Page were the other 
goal-scorer and Al Gallanaro, Pat 
Downey, Mike Reilly and John 



McTighe drew assists. 

Suburban Disposal disposed 
of Rich's South Shore Express, 
4-1, with Paul Hanlon, Paul 
Andrews, Jerry Smith and Kevin 
O'Neil doing the scoring. 

Frank Penzo, Paul Vlassakis, 
Tom Parke, Dana Cetlin, Scott 
Mitchell and Hanlon had assists. 

Paul Lynch got the goal for 
Rich's assisted by Bob Carmody. 



Hayes, Brennan Pace Pee Wee A's 



Bobby Hayes and : Tommy 
Brennan came up with two goals 
and three assists apiece last week 
as the Quincy Pee Wee "A" team 
walloped undefeated Columbia, 
8-2, in a Bay Colony Hockey 
Association contest. 

Paul McDermott had a goal 



and three assists, Leo Doyle and 
Johnny Mullin had a goal and an 
assist each, Eddie Kane had two 
assists, Kevin McGrath a goal 
and Brian Norton and Paul 
McGrath an assist apiece. 

The Quincy club also defeated 
Hull, 5-1, with Bobby Tierney 



and Dean Prescott standing out 

McCabe Leads Squirt B's Ov 



Paul McCabe scored two goals 
and assisted on another to spark 
the Quincy Squirt "B" team to a- 
5-1 victory over Hingham in a 
Bay Colony Hockey Association 
game. . ' 

Kevin Ryan, Johnny 



Cummings and Rich Stevens also 
had goals. Kevin Duff and Steve 
Kraunelis had two assists each 
and Mike McNiece had one. 

Dan Boyle contributed two 
goals in a 5-5 tie with Brockton. 



in the goal. 

McDermott, Kane, Mullin, 
Kevin McGrath and Scott 
Richardson had the goals and 
Hayes, Brennan, Kevin McGrath, 
Mark Messina and George 
Mackey were credited with 
assists. 

er Hingham 

McNiece had a goal and two 
assists, McCabe a goal and an 
assist and Stevens two assists in 
the deadlock. 

Ryan also had a goal and 
Chris Gorman and Mike Sullivan 
added assists. 




MOTHER 

NATURE 

CREATED 

NOW GOING ON 



YOU'VE HEARD IT ALL- "GAS SHORTAGE" - "NO SNOW" - "TOO WARM" 



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HART - HEAD - FISCHER 

$210 VALUES 



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COBB'S CONNER CANTON 

PLENTY OF FREE PARKING 

OPEN EVENINGS TILL 9 
SAT. 5:30 



Page 20 Quincy Sun Thursday, January 10, 1974 

Basketball 



Ouincy Downs North In Defensive Battle 

^^ / v, ., , .r,-, -.,-.. :„ "l rt, ink ■ hie reason for our reserves saw a lot of action. 



North Quincy's basketball 
teams under Bob Nolan have 
been noted for their outstanding 
defense. 

Joe Amorosino, Quincy's new 
head coach, also is a stickler for 
defense and last week's first 
meeting of the cross-town rivals 
resulted in a fine defensive battle 
with Quincy coming out on top, 
47-38, for its sixth successive 
win after a one-point opening 
night loss. The Presidents are all 
alone at the top of the Greater 
Boston League with a 4-0 
record. 

Quincy faced a big test 
Tuesday at Somerville, while 
North was home to Revere. 
Friday night the Presidents go to 
Everett and the Raiders host 
defending GBL champion 
Medford. 

Amorosino defeated his 
former "boss" last week. Joe 
had been North's junior varsity 



coach under Nolan for four 
years before moving to Quincy 
as jayvee coach a year ago. 

North got into early foul 
trouble and it was costly. In the 
first minute of the second period 
Quincy had its one-and-one 
bonus foul shots and sank five 
straight to open up an 
eight-point lead. 

North didn't get its 
one-and-one chances until the 
last minute and a half of the 
second period 4 Four straight free 
throws, two by Steve Maloney 
and two by Steve Miller, enabled 
the Raiders to close the gap to 
25-20 at halftime. 

In the final period North 
moved to within one point, 
35-34, but again the fouls came 
to the fore and in the last seven 
minutes of the game Quincy hit 
on 1 2 straight free throws to 
clinch its first win over North in 
three years. 



North had a 15-13 edge in 
shots from the floor but Quincy 
had a big 21-8 bulge from the 
foul line. 

"There is no doubt about it, 
those foul shots turned the game 
around," Nolan said. "I thought 
we played a heck of a game but 
all those foul shots by Quincy 
were too much to overcome." 

Amorosino felt his defense 
was the key to the big win. "We 
shut off Miller, a one-man gang 
for them," he said. "He had 18 
points in the previous game 
against Maiden but had only six 
against us. I knew if we played 
our regular defense, Miller and 
[Jed] Phelan, two of their big 
scorers, wouldn't get too many 
points. 

Again a big man in the Quincy 
defense was Billy Joyce. He was 
one of the area's best defensive, 
backs in football and has been 
just as out-standing on defense 
for Amorosino. 



'I think a big reason for our 
success is our balance," the new 
head coach said. "I have been 
able to use all my players in 
most games and usually all or 
most of them score. One thing I 
never do is try to humiliate a 
team or try to make a team look 
bad. We had a couple of very 
easy wins but the subs scored 
many of the points. 

Fred Donahue and Tom 
McKinnon had 10 points apiece 
against North, Mike Cullcn and 
Joyce had eight each. Donahue 
led the rebounders. 

For the Raiders, now 3-3 
overall and 2-2 in the GBL, Tim 
Clifford scored 10 points and 
Mark Reale had nine. Both are 
juniors. 

Earlier in the week Quincy 
Took over the GBL lead by 
breezing over Chelsea, 69-32, 
while Everett was being upset 
for the first time by Somerville. 

The Presidents had a big 
34-17 halftime bulge as the 



reserves saw a lot of action. 
Cullen and Don Connors had 1 2 
points apiece, McKinnon 1 1 and 
Joyce 10. 

Miller, whose brother Eddie is 
North's jayvee coach and a 
standout for the O'Brien Club 
semi-pro team, put on a dazzling 
one-man show to spark the 
Raiders to a 43-36 win over 
Maiden. 

Steve not only led the scorers 
with 18 points but his dribbling 
and ball handling continually 
frustrated the Maiden players 
who finally were forced to 
intentionally foul him. When 
they did, he usually sank the 
shots. 

Phelan, with 1 2 points, was 
the only other Raider in double 
figures. 

Not to be out-shone by his 
younger brother, Eddie Miller 
saw his junior varsity pound 
Maiden, 64-29, for its fourth 
win. 

-TOM SULLIVAN 



Bowling 



Applications Available For Men's Candlepin Tourney 



The 21st annual Greater 
Quincy Men's Candlepin 
Bowling Tourney will begin 
Sunday. Jan 20. at 1 p.m. at the 
Merrymount Daylight Alleys. 

The tourney is annually 
sponsored by the Koch Club of 
Quincy in its winter programs. 

Applications are now available 



and may be picked up at the 
Merrymount Daylight Alleys, 17 
Broad St.. Quincy. 

Teams must be from an 
organized men's candlepin 
bowling league. "No Pickup 
Teams Allowed". 

The top five bowlers in the 
league, as of Jan. 15, bowl in 



competition with the sixth and 
seventh bowlers in the standings 
used as alternates. If for one 
reason or another one of the top 

seven bowlers cannot compete, 
the league officials may continue 
to choose down in the league 
according to average, until the 



seven members are chosen. 

Bowlers entered must have 
bowled half the season thus far 
with their respective leagues, and 
may only bowl for one tourney 
entry. 

Any violation of the rules will 
forfeit the teams participation or 
continuance. 



All tourney matches will be 
decided on the total pinfall. 

It is an elimination tourney; 
and each team must win to 
continue in competition. 

A championship trophy and 
$100 cash prize will be awarded 
to the tourney winners. 



Nelson Clicks At Middlebury g rett Q| ub J a k e s 3-Point Lead 



Dave Nelson, former North 
Quincy basketball and baseball 
standout and now a sophomore 
at Middlebury College, is 
averaging 18 points a game for 



the school's basketball team 

In a 70-68 loss last Saturday 
to Hamilton, Nelson scored 24 
points. 



The Rep. Joseph E. Brett 
Club's 3-1 win over the Elks gave 
it a three-point lead over the 
Dick Morrissey Club in the 



AmoldValmer says 




Quincy Bowling Little Loop. 

Morrissey moved up with a 
3-1 win over Atlantic Fuel Oil 
while the Montclair Men's Club 
was losing three points to Local 
513. 

Dick Stohlberg of Morrissey 
Club rolled a 134 single to tie 
the figure of Brian Connolly set 
in the first week of the season. 

The standings: Brett Club, 
31-13 and total pinfall of 
13,409; Morrissey Club, 28-16 
[13,568]; Montclair, -27-17 
[13,360]; Granite Lodge 1451, 
27-17 [13,198]; Wollaston 
Bowladrome, 23-21 [13,192]; 
Atlantic, 21-23 [13,357]; 
Hutchinson Oil Co., 21-23 
[13,249]; Bryan Post VFW, 
20-24 [13,152]; DA George G. 
Burke, 20-24 [13,093]; 
Hennessey Plumbing Supply, 



20-24 [13,030]; Hal Davis Club, 
20-24 [12,948]; Local 513 
AFL-CIO, 18-26 [13,095]; 
Quincy Elks, 16-28 [13,074]; 
James R. Mclntyre Club, 15-29 
[12,967]. 

Mike Regan of Elks has high 
average of 97.6, followed by 
Dan Finn, Burke Club, 96.27; 
Brian Connolly, Local 1451, 
95.25; Nick Anastas, Montclair, 
95.15; John Andrews, Brett, 
91.24; Larry McGrath, 
Bowladrome, 91.16; Jim 
McAllister, Atlantic, 90.32; Ken 
Allman, Morrissey, 90.25; Kev 
Mullaney, Bryan, 90.12; Ken 
Brodie, Local 513, 89.7. 

Mclntyre has high team three 
of 1283 and Morrissey holds 
high team single of 461. 
Stohlberg has high three of 312 
in addition to his 1 34 single. 



Venezia, Smith Tie For 
Women's Merchants Lead 



Venezia Insurance and the 
Body Smith Shop are tied for 
the lead in the Women's 
Merchants Bowling League with 

J Quincy Sun J 

» Available At * 



CARADONNA'S 

NEWS & BOOK STAND J 
1500 HANCOCK ST. * 



* 



QUINCY SQUARE 



* — - * 

* Paperbacks Tobaccos J 

* Newspapers Magazines * 



84-52 records. 

They are followed by South 
Shore Candy, 77-59; Chiminiello 
Oil, 7 1-65; Pepe's Express, 52-84 
and Merrymount Lanes, 40-96. 

Edna Walker has the high 
average of 1 04.8; Ellie Iacobucci 
is 102.5; Noreen Mastroianni, 
100.4; Ann Casanova, 99.6; Bev 
Putnam, 99.2; Terry Spencer, 
98.2; Elaine Rozanski, 97.2; 
Taffy Serroni, 96.4; Ann Crespi, 
96.4 and Sandy Barrie, 95.9. 

Chiminiello has high team 
three of 1454, Venezia high 
team single of 526, Bev Putnam 
high individual three of 330 and 
Edna Walker high individual 
single of 1 22. 



HOW TO SHOVE A PUSHER 

If you have seen illegal drugs being sold or know where a 
pusher operates you can help end this dangerous traffic with a 
simple letter to the Police Department. 

Put down everything you know about the pusher and his 
operation and send the letter to Lieutenant Walter Lynch, 
Quincy Police Department, Southern Artery, Quincy, Mass. or 
Call 479-1212, Ext. 348. 



SPACE Cil!lT»illlTFD AS A I'l, 81 X «.rnVICF BV TMfi PUlLiSHEB 




Thursday, January 10, 1974 Quincy Sun Page 21 



• Hockey 



QUINCY'S Charles [Chuck] Condos is a member of the 1973-74 
Bowdoin College Varsity Hockey team. A graduate of Quincy High 
School, he is the son of Mr. and Mrs. Peter Condos of 59 
Merrymount Rd, Quincy. 

• St. Ann's Hockey 

Flyers, Bruins, 
Northstars Win 



In St. Ann's Hockey League 
Pee Wee games at the Shea Rink, 
the Flyers edged New York, 3-2. 

Terry Prendiville, Craig 
DiBona and Jack Webb scored 
for the Flyers with assists going 
to Paul O'Sullivan, Jim Meehan, 
Webb and Mark Litif. Scoring 
the New York goals were Brian 
Dowing and John Hurley, both 
unassisted. 

The Bruins walloped the 
Flames, 6-1, with Mark Milline 
scoring three goals. Mike Capone 
had two and Greg Kelly the 
other for the -Bruins. Assists 
went to Kelly [2], Milline, 
Capone. Joe Crifo had the 
Flames' goal with Gary Stokes 
assisting. 

The Northstars nipped 
Detroit, 2-1, with Chris Clark 
and Joe Duggan scoring the 
winners' goals and John Keller 
having an assist. Andy Gillis 
scored the Detroit goal with 
Steve Hagan and Dan Rowley 
assisting. 

In Bantam games Detroit 
squeezed by the Flyers, 3-2. 
Mike Therrien had two goals for 
Detroit and Mark O'Sullivan the 
other, with Bill Shine, Bill 
Goslin and Mike Doyle assisting. 
Mike DeFazio and Brian 
McMahon scored for the Flyers 
with Karl Olson and Rich Carroll 
having assists. 



The Flames blanked the 
Bruins, 4-0, with goals by Joe 
Carr, John Gravina, Pat 
Wilkinson and Tom Nazzaro, 
who scored on a penalty shot. 
Assists went to Tom Burke, 
Nazzaro, Billy Cyr and Carr. 

New York romped over 
Northstars, 6-0, with Carl 
Bergstrom having two goals. 
Brian Schmitt, Eric Bergstrom, 
Kev O'Connell and Jim Keller 
scored one each and assists went 
to Brian Buckley, Rich 
McKerrien, Kevin Kelly, 
Buckley, O'Connell, Frank 
Kelly, Paul Schmitt and Mat 
Breslin. Mike McColgan was 
outstanding in goal for New 
York. 

In a Monday night game at 
Shea the St. Ann's Bantam 
all-stars lost to Sacred Heart of 
North Quincy, 5-3. 

Scott Williams had three goals 
for Sacred Heart and Jack 
Cadigan and Bob Bent the 
others. Adding assists were Joe 
Greaney, Bob Marsters, Joe 
Koch, Billy Bent, Jim Kelly and 
Jim Cunniff. Paul Howe, Rick 
Smith and Jim Doherty had St. 
Ann's goals, with Bill Goslin, 
Eric Bergstrom and Rich Carroll 
assisting. Dennis McDonough 
was in goal for Sacred Heart and 
Paul Redmond and Mike 
McLaughlin for St. Ann's. 



Kiwanis International Hockey 
Tourney At Quincy, Weymouth 

t, .*■ . • . i ni hi w:. ...:n -I... f„, ♦!,.» 



The Kiwanis International 
Youth Hockey Tournament, 
long a fixture at Weymouth 
Arena, is spreading out to 
Quincy this year. 

Two of the tourney's four 
divisions will be played at the 
Quincy Youth Hockey Arena 
and two at Weymouth beginning 
Thursday. Feb. 21, and 
continuing through Sunday, 
Feb. 24. 

Th: tour age divisions are 
Mites {6-81, Squirts [8-101, Pee 
Wees [10-121 and Bantams 



[13-14]. Mites will play for the 
first time this year. 

Members of visiting teams, 
some of them from Canada, will 
be housed at the homes of 
members of the teams they will 
be playing. 

Additional facilities will be 
available at the South 
Weymouth Naval Air Station. 



NEWSBOYS WANTED 
Here's a chance to earn extra 
money by building a Quincy 
Sun home delivery route. 

Telephone: 471-3100 



Quincy's Title Hopes Dim; 
North Ends Loss Streak 



The Quincy High hockey 
team, which had won five in a 
row after a tough opening night 
loss, saw its hopes of winning 
the Greater Boston League 
championship just about vanish 
Monday when it lost to the 
league's number one and two 
teams in successive games. 

However, Coach Bob Sylvia 
still has high hopes of making 
the state tournament after 
missing out the last two years 
and the Presidents will continue 
their quest of this goal Friday 
when they meet Revere at 9 
p.m. at Boston Arena. Monday 
Quincy will face Med ford at 
6:30. 

Meanwhile, Ron Erikson's 
North Quincy team; which had 
ended a five-game winless streak 
in its previous game, played 
Maiden last night [Wednesday). 
The Raiders will face Somervillc 
Friday at 6:30 and Maiden 
Monday night at 9. 

After being nipped by second 
place Somerville last Friday, 
Quincy was shut out for the first 
time Monday and lost to 
Maiden's unbeaten league leaders 
and defending champions, 4-0. 

"We had to win at least one of , 
those games to keep any chance 
of winning the title, but I'm still 
aiming for the tourney and feel 
we have a good chance of 
making it," Sylvia said. 

The Presidents have another 
shot at both Maiden and 



Somerville and if some of the 
other teams can knock them off, 
Quincy could still have a slight 
chance of at least tying for the 
title. 

Last Friday Quincy and North 
streaks came to an end, happily 
for the Raiders but unhappily 
for the Presidents. 

Quincy's five-game winning 
streak was halted when 
Somerville, trailing, 4-3, with 
seven minutes left, edged the 
Presidents, 5-4. 

North's five-game winless 
streak came to an end with a 5-2 
win over Revere. 

Al Lancione gave Quincy a 
l-l tie in the first period and 
Frank Guest and Ted 
Wiedemann scored in the second 
period as the teams went into 
the finale tied, 3-3. Lancione's 
second goal put the Presidents 
ahead, 4-3, but Somerville's Bob 
McDonald tied it at 8:05 and, 
with 2:30 left, Mark Guidi 
scored the winner. 

"Somerville has lost only one 
and the boys are a bit 
discouraged at the loss, but they 
don't give up and they work 
hard," Sylvia said. 

Frikson credited team work 
for North's long-awaited win. 
"It's been a disappointing season 
and I think one of the reasons 
has been that we weren't playing 
together," he said. 

"Tonight we finally played as 
a team and maybe we'll begin to 



click now." 

Four Raiders scored, Andy 
Colleran having two. Colleran 
scored the first with Brian 
Maclsaac and Mark Hurley 
assisting and Jim Mullaney made 
it 2-0 with Rob Henderson and 
Dave Noonan having assists. 

In the second period Maclsaac 
scored unassisted but Revere 
closed the gap to 3-2. Paul 
O'Donnell scored North's fourth 
goal and Colleran added his 
second and the team's last. 
North sophomore goalie Dave 
O'Hanley blanked Revere in the 
last period. 

Earlier in the week Quincy 
topped Chelsea, 4-2, for its fifth 
win in a row as Guest, having a 
sensational sophomore year, 
scored three goals and 
Wiedemann, high scoring junior, 
had the other. Goalie Glenn 
Prescott had an excellent night. 

North, leading, 3-1, had to 
settle for a 4-4 tie with Everett 
and it took a goal by Mike 
McLean with just eight seconds 
remaining in the game and Rich 
McGue out of the nets to tie it. 

Mullaney scored the first goal 
and Colleran made it 2-0. After 
an Everett tally, McLean scored 
unassisted for the only goal of 
the second period. Everett then 
bounced back with three last 
period goals to go ahead before 
McLean, converting passes from 
Maclsaac and Glen Hanson, tied 
it. 



Bantam A's Defeat Canton, Holbrook 



Matt Schaeffer and Mike 
McGrath showed the way as the 
Quincy Bantam "A" team, after 
two straight losses, resumed the 
winning trail last week with Bay 
Colony Hockey Association 
victories over Canton and 
Holbrook. 

Schaeffer and McGrath each 



had a pair of goals in the 4-1 
decision over Canton Wednesday 
[Jan. 21 while Mark Giordani 
had two assists and Jim Shea had 
one. 

'Schaeffer had the three-goal 
hat trick Saturday [Jan. 5 J as 
Quincy overwhelmed Holbrook, 
10-1, to run its league record to 
22 wins and five losses. 



Giordani and John Mitchell 
had two goals each and 
McGrath, Shea, Brian Bertoni 
and Richie Troy had one apiece. 

Rick Dannar assisted on three 
goals and other assists went to 
Mike Smith [21, McGrath, Shea, 
Mitchell, Bertoni and John 
Cooney. 



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Page 22 Quincy Sun Thursday, January 10, 1974 

• Basketball 

ENC Host To Roger Williams 



The Eastern Nazarene College 
basketball team, which placed 
third in the annual Gordon 
Tournament last weekend, will 
host Roger Williams College 
Friday at 8 p.m. at its new gym. 

The Crusaders will be home to 
Southeastern Mass. U. Saturday 
at 8 and will entertain Rhode 
Island College Monday, also at 8. 

ENC last Friday bowed to 
Grace College, 95-80, in the 
opening round of the Gordon 
tourney but rebounded to 
wallop Gordon, 90-54, in the 
consolation game. Grace won 
the tourney with a 74-71 win 
over Barrington. 

Tops in the win over Gordon 
was Jerry Whetstone with 24 



points. Mike Cox scored 18, 
Tom Gunsalus 14 and Quincy's 
Rick Reyenger 10. The 6-7 
Reyenger, former Quincy High 
ace, dominated the boards and 
was named to the all-tourney 
team. 

The Crusaders take a 3-3 
record and 1-0 Seaboard 
Conference mark into Friday's 
game with Williams. 

Coach Jim Smith, who has an 
impressive three-year 71-22 
record at F.NC^sees trouble for 
his team this year. 

"I think we are too 
inexperienced in the back court 
to make it to any post-season 
tournaments this year," Smith 
said. "But I'm hoping to finish 



with a winning record." 

Smith sees the absence of a 
'real good ballhandler who can 
penetrate the press' as his 
number one problem. 

In making the National 
Christian College Tournament in 
Chattanooga, Tenn., in each of 
his three years at ENC, and the 
NAIA playoffs once. Smith had 
the brilliant Ron Bradley, one of 
the top small college players in 
the country. Bradley was 
supported by several outstanding 
. two-way players, all of whom, 
like Bradley, graduated. 

The ENC coach is pleased 
with the Crusaders' outside 
shooting, one of the bright spots 
of the season to date. 



Winners Announced In 
Elk's Hoop Shoot Contest 



Over 1000 boys, eight to 13 
years of age. competed in the 
third annual Quincy Lodge of 
Elk's Hoop Shoot Basketball 
Contest. announces Youth 
Committee Chairman William F. 
Ryan. 

Preliminary contests were 
held by the Quincy Recreation 
Department in 10 school 
gymnasiums and in the Quincy 
Public schools elementary 
physical education classes under 
the direction of Quincy Junior 
College Basketball Coach Earl 
Vermillion, who served his third 
year as chairman for the event. 
Last Saturday over 70 boys 



competed in the finals which 
were held at the North Quincy 
high school gym. 

Winners in each of the three 
age divisions will compete in 
Elk's District Contests with the 
winners competing in the 
Massachusetts Elk's Association 
final. State finalists will compete 
in an all-expense paid national 
contest to be held in Kansas in 
conjunction with the National 
Association of Interscholastic 
Athletics Basketball 
Tournament. 

Winners were: 

8 - 1 > years: 

[1) Dan Marsters. 40 
Estabrook Rd, Beechwood Knoll 



School; 121 Bill Gray, 160 
Sherman St., Montclair School; 
(31 Mike Pimental, 128 Standish 
Rd, Squantum School. . 

10-11 years: 

[ 11 Tom McFarland. 1 Pitts 
Ave., Wollaston School: [ 2 I Bob 
Bolster. 140 Brook St., 
Wollaston School; [31 Dean 
Colctti, 14 Alden St.. Webster 
School. 

12-13 years: 

[1] Brian Harding, 17 
Winthrop Ave., Wollaston 
School; [21 Larry Baker, 57 
Safford St., Montclair School; 
[3] Bob Evans, 37 Thornton St.. 
Beechwood Knoll School: • 



O'Brien Club Rolls Merrily Along 



The high flying O'Brien Club 
basketball team of Quincy 
continues to roll merrily along 
and last night [Wednesday) 
sought its 11th straight win 
without a defeat when it met the 
strong Boston Stars at Roxbury. 

Sunday night at 7:30 the 
O'Briens will host the Easton 



Huskies at North Quincy High. 

Last Sunday the Quincy 
powerhouse won its 10th in a 
row, ninth in the Cranberry 
League, by topping the Wholey 
Club of Hull, 101-89. 

Ron Bradley led the O'Brien 
scoring with 27 points and in the 
final period, with the Wholey 



Club forced to foul to regain 
possession of the ball, was 10 for 
10 from the foul line despite 
having one eye nearly closed by 
a stray elbow. 

Eddie Miller had 20 points, 
Bob McNamara 16 and Allan 
Dalton 14. 



Red, Gold Teams St. Joseph's Winners 



In St. Joseph's Hockey 
League action at Shea Rink, the 
Red team defeated the Blues, 
5-1, and the Golds edged the 
Greens, 3-2. 

In the Red team's win Jim 
Crowley had two goals and an 
assist, Rick Coombs a goal and 



assist, Mike McNally and Paul 
DeCristofaro a gial each. Paul 
Erickson had the only Blue goal. 

With just five seconds left in 
the game, Butch Franceshini 
scored the winning goal for the 
Gold team. John Conso and 



Mike Grogan had the other Gold 
goals while Mike Sullivan and 
Frank Clarke scored for the 
Greens. 

The Reds lead the league with 
an 8-1 record, followed by Gold, 
6-3; Blue, 4-5, and Green, 0-9. 



Quincy Power Squadron Boating Course 



The Quincy Bay Power 
Squadron Spring Boating Course 
is underway in the cafeteria at 
Braintree High School. 

The course is open to the 
general public at no charge. 
Children under 16 must be 
accompanied by an adult. The 
only charge is for materials 
purchased, which cost a 
maximum of approximately 
$10. 

The course is taught by 
experienced, volunteer boatmen 
who are members of the Quincy 
Bay Power Squadron, a 



component squadron of the 
United States Power Squadrons. 
This same course will be given 
by over 400 squadrons coast to 
coast, to over 40,000 students. 
Among subjects covered in 
this course are boat handling 
under both normal and adverse 
conditions, seamanship, rules of 
the road, aids to navigation, 
running lights and equipment, 
boat trailering; the mariners 
compass and piloting, and 
compass and chaitwork: This is a 
basic course, extremely useful 
for the new and inexperienced 



boater, and valuable to all, even 
the most experienced. 

The course runs about 13 
weeks, and ends with an 
examination. Those passing the 
exam are awarded a certificate, 
attesting to their success in the 
course. 

More information concerning 
the course may be obtained by 
calling either Lt. Gordon .N. 
Carter, AP, Chairman of Boating 
[698-7711] or Lt. Cdr! 
Lawrence P. Frazier Jr., 'JN, 
Squadron Education Officer,, at' 
843r2664. 



Broad Meadows, A-N In Opening Wins 



In opening games of the 
Quincy Junior High basketball 
league, Broad Meadows ninth 
grade team edged Central, 15-13, 
on two foul shots with seven 



seconds left. Both 
excelled on defense. 



teams 




Fight 
Lung 

Disease 



The eighth grade game ended 
in an 18-18 tie and Central won 
the seventh grade game. 

Atlantic-North swept three 
games from Point. The ninth 
grade romped, 43-10, as Mac 



McGinley scored 12 points and 
Bill Mclntyre six. Mike Larnie 
had four for Point. 

A-N won the eighth grade 
game, 24-11, paced by Joe 
Dean's 10 points, and the 
seventh graders breezed, 31-7, 
with Pete Sorenson having 10 
points and Kevin Cobban six for 
A-N. 



Fight emphysema, 
tuberculosis, air pollution 

Space coniributed by ttw publisher as a puMc service 



NEWSBOYS WANTED 
Here's a chance to earn extra 
money by building a Quincy 
Sun home delivery route. 

Telephone. 471-31 00 



• Track 

Quincy Romps; 
North Bows 



Quincy's track team continues 
to click and last Saturday 
romped over Everett, 62-24, to 
hike its Greater Boston League 
record to 4-1. 

The Presidents will have to 
wait until Saturday, Jan. 19, to 
go after their fifth win as the 
GBL will be idle this week. On 
that date, Quincy meets Chelsea 
while North Quincy faces 
Medford at the Medford High 
cage. Next Wednesday the 
Presidents will meet Haverhill in 
a non-league meet at Peabody at 
3:15. 

In last week's breeze Gary 
Delorio continued undefeated as 
he won the mile. Steve Player 
was second and Chip Coletta 
third to complete a sweep. 

Arnie Vorrosso won the 1000 
with Steve Nolan second. Brad 
Kimball won the 600 with Jim 
Griffin third. Dave DeBona was 
the winner in the 300 with 
Harry Williams third. 
Sophomore Al Vachon, 
improving every week, won his 
third straight 50-yard dash with 



Pete Ram poni third. 

Steve Burke and Art DiLoreto 
were 1-2 in the high- hurdles, 
won by Quincy in every meet. 
DiLoreto won the high jump 
with Soph Sam Gravina second 
and Burke^ third. Mike Varrasso 
third in the shot put and the 
relay team of, O'Brien, Steve 
Oriola, Burke and Vorrosso won 
to wrap up the meet. 

North fell before, a strong 
Chelsea team, 53-33, although 
Mark Canavan. ' and Geoff- 
Hennessey remained unbeaten, 
Canavah winning the 1000 and 
Hennessey the high hurdles. • 

Sophomore ace Bart Petracca 
won the two-mile, Art Barrett 
was second and Bill Lapsley, 
who has come a long way in his 
first year of track, third in the 
mile, Chris Cordeiro was second 
in the 1000, John Mackey won 
the 600 with sophomore Mike 
Nee third, Phil Robinson was 
third in the 300, John Flynn 
third in the 50, his first defeat, 
and Canavan second in the high 
jump. 



Skiing Underway 
Despite Lack Of Snow 



Despite the lack of local 
skiing snow the Quincy 
Recreation Department's 
instructional ski program is in 
full swing with indoor lessons 
being conducted at the 
Wollaston School gymnasium 
under the direction of veteran 
ski program supervisor William 
[Bill] Ellis. 

For the first time in the 17 
years of operation the program 
experienced a lack of snow 
during the 1973 season but the 
1974 skiers were out on 
Heavenly Hill last Friday and 















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Saturday for outdoor lessons 
which will continue at the 
Furnace Brook Golf Club slope 
located at the Stoney Brae 
Playground on South Central 
Avenue in Wollaston on the 
following schedule: 

Youngsters six years of age 
and over through the sixth grade 
on Tuesdays at 2 p.m., 
Thursdays at 3 p.m., and 
Saturdays at 1 p.m. Seventh, 
eighth and ninth graders, 
Mondays and Wednesdays at 3 
p.m.,. and 2:15 p.m. on 
Saturdays. Adults Mondays and 
Thursdays at 7:30 p.m., 
Saturdays 1 to 3:30 p.m., 
Tuesdays and Thursdays at 1 
p.m. 

Senior High Skiers, 
Wednesdays and Fridays at 7:30 
p.m., and Saturdays 2:15 p.m. 

New registrants are still being 
accepted at the Wollaston 
School Gymnasium according to 
Recreation Director William F. 
Ryan. Junior and Senior High 
Students meet Thursdays and 
the Elementary group at 2 p.m. 
Saturdays. 



ACROSS 



l. 




Remind of a 
fault 

Salad for a 
picnic 

Song: , "Me and 
My—'* 
Lofty 
Headlong: 
hyph. wd. 
Competently 
Badly 

Meadow, poetic- 
ally Speaking: 
Cereal grass 
.Verjr great • 
amounts 
Pleased • "... 
Boy scouts' units 
Somewhat dark 
European . ' 
country ," 
Bdg • 
Humans, for 
instance 
Bend -out of 
shape 
Corruption 
Dandy 
Melody 
Dancer Kelly 
— one's time: 
wait 

Precious metal 
Impulse 
Greet 

ceremoniously 
Hollow-stemmed 



11. 
12. 

15. 
16. 

17. 

18. 
19. 

20'. 
21. 
23. 
24. 

26V 
29, 

'33. 

34. 
35. 
36. 
37. 
38. 

39. 
41. 
42. 

43. 



44. Mirth 



DOWN 

1. At— , just 
before it's too 
late: 3 wds. 

2. Barriers 

3. Uselessly 

4. Masculine name 

5. Acute 

6. Its capital is 
Tripoli 

7. Metal tip on a 
cord or lace 

8. Child's constant 
question 

9. Speeches: slang 
10. Water sources 

13. Let (out) 
accidentally 

14. Gentlewoman 



19. Dinner course 

20. Pacific island 

22. Sloping passage 

23. "Thin" coin 

25. Type of flower 
cluster 

26. Exchange 

27. Mournful cry 

28. Tapestry 

30. Biasing ■ 

31. Hunter's 
house 

32. Rapidity 
34. Locality of a 

trial 

37. Lobster's breath- 
ing organ 

38. Prickly pod 
40. Label 



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, - . i ,: i i I I >> i • I I I I t I I I I I I I r I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I > ■ I > I I I 



Thursday, January 10, 1974 Quincy Sun Page 23 



DEATHS 



Joseph H. Kcllcher, 81, of 9 
Arbetter Dr., Framingham, 
formerly of Quincy, at the 
Meadow Brook Lodge Nursing 
Home, Dec. 29. 

Isadore Tolchinsky, 82, of 
169 Hamilton Ave., at Quincy 
City Hospital, Dec. 30. 

Miss EllaM. Livingston, 83, of 
475 Beale St., at Quincy City 
Hospital, Dec. 29. 

Mrs. Emma S. /Hendrickson/ 
Hall, 80, of 53 Wilkins Rd, 
Braintree, formerly of Quincy, 
at a Weymouth nursing home, 
Dec. 30. 

John J. MacPherson, 53, of 75 
Faxon Lane, unexpectedly at 
Quincy City Hospital, Dec. 31. 

Miss Helen Agnes Gooch, 76, 
formerly of Marlboro St., at 
Quincy City Hospital, Dec. 30. 

Mrs. Ida C. IHallquistJ 
Wigren, of 69 Earle St., 
Brockton, formerly of Quincy, 
unexpectedly at her home, Dec. 
30. 

Mrs. James [Davis] Whitelaw, 
75, of 33 South St., at Quincy 
City Hospital, Jan. 1. 

Mrs. Elizabeth V. [Murphy J 
Landry, 74, of 20 Ocean St., at 
an Abington nursing home, Dec. 
31. 

Mrs. Mary M. [RedmondJ 
Tomeo, 71, of 38 Germaine 
Ave., unexpectedly at her home, 
Jan. 1. 

Thomas P. Higgins, 39, of 11 
Quincy St., at his home, Dec. 
31. 

Miss Mary Orvitt, 87, of 220 
Beech St., at Quincy ,Clty 
Hospital, Dec. 31. 

Mrs. Grace [Durgin/ Waite, 
94, formerly of Norfolk St., at 
Quincy City Hospital, Dec. 28. 

Joshua F. Hillier, 85, of North 
Miami, Fla., formerly of Quincy, 
in North Miami, Dec. 31. 

Russell H. Phillips, 64, of 255 
North Central A ve. , on arrival at 
Quincy City Hospital, Dec. 31. 

Dennis Behan, 62, of 18 
Common St., at Quincy City 
Hospital, Dec. 31. 

Mrs. Murial [McMullen/ 
Alexander Joy, 59, of 143 
Hanian Drive, Weymouth, 
formerly of Quincy, at South 
Shore Hospital, Weymouth, Jan. 
3. 



MEMORIAL 
GIFTS 

EVERYTHING THAT IS 

WORTHWHILE & 

APPRECIATED BY 

YOUR CHURCH 

A.E. GOODHUE 

COMPANY 
VESTMENT MANUFACTURERS 

500 IN STOCK 
1163 HANCOCK ST. 
QUINCY -472-3090 



Mrs. Florence / MacGillvary J 
Chisholm, 87, of 19 Whitman 
Rd, in Hingham, Jan. 3. 

Mrs. Mary J. [Moloney! 
Gamache, 89, of 10 Gertrude 
Ave., at a local nursing home, 
Jan. 3. 

Mrs. Beatrice [Gregson] 
Jamieson, 59, of 200 W. 
Squantum St., at Peter Bent 
Brigham Hospital, Boston, Jan. 
3. 

Mrs. Elizabeth F. [Duron J 
Thompson, 83, of 125 Broad 
St., Weymouth, formerly of 
Quincy, at a local nursing home, 
Jan. 2. 

Miss Mildred Mcllwraith, 79, 
of 115 East Squantum St., 
unexpectedly at her home, Jan. 
2. 

Harold F. Williams Sr., 65, of 
134 Gushing St., Hingham, 
formerly of Quincy, at South 
Shore Hospital, Wevmouth, Jan. 
2, 

Mrs. Mary E. [ Hayes} Lynch, 
79, of 34 Albany St., at Quincy 
City Hospital. Jan. 3. 

Frank B. DeVanna, 81, of 86 
Myopia Rd, at Long Island 
Hospital, Boston, Jan. 3. 

Mrs. Henrietta A. [Kern J 
Daly, 84, of Quincy at Quincy 
City Hospital, Jan. 4. 

Miss Helen L. Dwyer, 69, of 9 
Montctair Ave, at Jewish 
Memorial Hospital, Roxbury, 
Jan. 3. 

Joseph A. MacDonald Sr., 60, 
of 98 Willow Ave., at University 
Hospital, Boston, Jan. 3. 

Lucio A. Fabrizio, 55, of 81 
Alton Road, on arrival at Quincy 
City Hospital, Jan. 4. 

William E. Dean Sr., 78, of 9 
Cliff St., at Quincy City 
Hospital, Jan. 6. 

William T. Pagnano, 61, of 68 
Davis St., Hanover, formerly of 
Quincy, at a Boston hospital, 
Jan. 4. 

John B. Cronin, 72, of 95 
Martcnsen St.. at Quincy City 
Hospital, Jan. 5. 




ROY'S 
FLOWERS 

94 WASHINGTON ST 

QUINCY 
MAJOR CREDIT 
CARDS ACCEPTED, 
BY PHONE 

472-1900, 



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326 COPEL AND STREET 
W. QUINCY 




Inter-Church Council Plans 
Prayer For Christian Unity Program 



The 1974 Week of Prayer for 
Christian Unity will be observed 
by the Inter-Church Council 
Sunday, Jan. 20, at 7:30 p.m. at 
First Church, Congregational, 
Squantum. 

Devotions led by Rev. William 
Heinrich of First Church will be 
followed by round table 
discussions with guidelines 
prepared by Rev. Jerome Doyle 



of Sacred Heart Church, North 
Quincy. 

After a period of time for 
fellowship and refreshments, the 
clergy will field questions 
developed b>y the 
"around-the-table groups". Rev. 
William Underhill of St. 
Chrysostom's Church, Wollaston 
will moderate. 

Concluding devotions will be 



led by Rev. Frank Archer, Union 
Congregational Church, 
Wollaston. 

The committee planning the 
program comprises Fr. Doyle, 
Donald Fraser, Mrs. B. Lawrence 
Shalit, and Rev. Douglas 
Macintosh, Memorial 
Congregational Church, North 
Quincy, chairman. 



'Increasing Community Involvement' 
Course At First Parish Church 



A new adult education class is 
announced by United First 
Parish Church, Quincy Sq., 
dealing with ways to increase 
voluntary participation in the 
community. 

"We have developed this 
program," said Rev. John R. 
Graham, who will serve as leader 
of the course, "because we 
believe citizen participation is 
essential for the health of 
American society. Far too often 
volunteers are utilized poorly. 
They're relegated to tasks such 
as stuffing envelopes." 



"Increasing Community 
Involvement" is a six-week 
course beginning Jan. 21 and 
continuing through Feb. 25. 
Each two-hour session will be 
held at 8 p.m. in the parish hall. 

Assisting in the program will 
be other community 
representatives including Martin 
J. Haley, Executive Director 
South Shore Mental Health 
Association. 

The workshop sessions will 
deal with ways to effectively 
recruit and utilize volunteers, 



team building, as well as 
methods to make Boards more 
effective and productive. 

A special feature of each 
session will be a "problem 
clinic" so that the participants 
may discover answers to issues 
they are facing in their particular 
organizations. 

Enrollment for the class is 
through the United First Parish 
Church at 773-1290. There is a 
$3 registration fee for the six 
sessions, which are open to the 
public. 



Dr. Nergesh Surti Named To St. Margaret's Staff 



Dr. Nergesh R. Surti, of 
School St., Quincy, has been 
appointed to the staff of the 
Pediatric service of St. 
Margaret's Hospital in 
Dorchester. 



Dr. Surti is a native of 
Bombay, India and a graduate of 
St. Xavier's College and Seth 
Medical College, both of India. 

After completing her 
internship in her native country, 



she served her Pediatric 
Residency at Boston City 
Hospital. In 1967, she 
completed studies for a Masters 
Degree in Public Health at 
Harvard University. 




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white walls with our automatic 
wheel washer. 



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( o n p c ■., ' I t- the u i n c v Police Station) 



Page 24 Quincy Sun Thursday, January 10, 1974 




HOLLYWOOD HOTLINE 



S.S. Natural Science 
Center Open Sundays 



The South Shore Natural 
Science Center will be open 
every Sunday from 2-4 p.m. for 
informal walks and an 
opportunity to see some exhibits 
and occasional bird banding. 



The Science Center is located 
on Jacobs Lane, just east of the 
junction of Routes 53 and 123 
in Norwell. The center is also 
open every weekday from 9 a.m. 
to 4 p.m. 






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Burton wins, Tinker loses 



By NANCY ANDERSON 
Copley News Service 

HOLLYWOOD - Like the 
old song said: "Somebody 
loses; somebody wins." 

And so far the winner of the 
month is Richard Burton who 
reclaimed Elizabeth Taylor 
from Henry Wynberg and 
took her back to Naples. 

Richard gave Liz a dia- 
mond-encrusted, heart- 
shaped pendant as a kiss-and- 
makeup gift. 

He called Elizabeth on the 
Monday before their reunion, 
and they agreed to give their 
marriage another chance be- 
fore he so much as bought an 
airline ticket for the States. 

Wynberg got word that he 
was out on Thursday, not 
when Richard actually ar- 
rived as has been reported 
elsewhere. 

Throughout her hospitaliza- 
tion at UCLA Medical Center, 
Liz maintained a bungalow at 
the Beverly Hills Hotel, but it 
was not to this one that Rich- 
ard repaired when he first 
reached Los Angeles. 

As late as the Saturday be- 
fore they left for Italy on Sun- 
day, the Burtons were regis- 
tered separately at the posh 
hostelry. 

However, on Sunday morn- 
ing a caller ringing through to 
Elizabeth's pad inquired, "Is 
this Mrs. Burton's bunga- 
low?" and was advised, "This 
is Mr. and Mrs. Burton's 
bungalow." 

Whereas the reconcilliation 
wasn't a spur-of-the-moment 

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thing, the purchase of Liz's 
diamond pendant was. 

Burton, acting on impulse, 
popped into Van Cleef and Ar- 
pels in Beverly Hills without 
even calling ahead to ask the 
jewelers to dust off their best 
diamonds for his inspection. 

And now for the loser of the 
month: 

Not counting Henry Wyn- 
berg, the big loser for Decem- 
ber is Grant Tinker who's lost 
his wife, Mary Tyler Moore. 

He's been begging her to re- 
consider her decision to end 
their marriage but without re- 
sults. 

The split is all very civil- 
ized, free from recrimina- 
tions, and, according to a 
spokesman for Mary, without 
the involvement of any third 
party. 

Nevertheless, I've been 
hearing for a long time that an 
agent, divorced not long ago 
from another glamorous 
actress, is hot after Mary. In 
fact, I mentioned this once in 
a blind item and said I didn't 
think he'd get her. 

Now, though, his prospects 
look brighter. 

+ + + 

Shoes, the dog-star of the 
Andy Williams Christmas 
show, may look like a mutt 
( half terrier and half chihau- 
hau), but he has a proud pedi- 
gree. His pappa was JFK's 
dog, Shannon, and his 
mamma belonged to RFK. 

+ + + 

Noting that movie making 
doesn't pay like it used to, 
David Janssen went to court 
to beg that his $3,800 a month 
alimony, due ex-wife Ellie, be 
reduced to "a reasonable 
sum." 



The judge thought $2,800 a 
month seemed reasonable 
and set the figure there. 

At the same time, he or- 
dered David to give his for- 
mer bride the $35,000 she 
claims he's in arrears. 

+ + + 

Karen Valentine's seeing a 
lot of Jon Hager, one of the 
Hager Twins of "Hee Haw." 

Meanwhile, with "Room 
222" cancelled, production be- 
gins February 15 on "The 
Karen Valentine Show," a 
television situation comedy 
pilot starring guess who. 

+ + + 
Margaret O'Brien, at the 
taping of the television show 
celebrating Warner Brothers' 
50th anniversary, was es- 
corted by casting director- 
producer Marvin Paige and 
looked smashing. She's re- 
cently peeled off 30 pounds. 

+ + + 

Albert Brooks, the 24-year- 
old comedian who's already 
appeared on "The Johnny 
Carson Show" a couple of 
dozen times as well as on oth- 
er shows and in clubs arid con- 
cert engagements across the 
country, is the son of Parkya- 
karkas, an important comic of 
the '30's. You do remember 
him, don't you? 

"But he died when I was 
only 12 years old," Albert 
says, "so he didn't affect 1W 
comedy style- any*;- • ** '■'"' 

"Perhaps he wouldn!thave 
affected it even If he'd lived, 
because times now are so dif- 
ferent. 

"I don't think we approach 
comedy the same way, be- 
cause I don't even know what 
his approach was." 



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Featuring Sherried Seafood 

* Assorted Hot and Cold Dishes 

* Vegetables - Potatoes - Dessert 

* Cheeses - Coffee or Tea 

All this for only $3.00 



WALSH'S 
RESTAURANT 



BILLINGS RD. NORTH QUINCY 773-5508 



Quincy To Be 

Seen On 
Channels 2,44 

.Channel 2 will air a film made 
in Quincy as part of the series on 
"Where to Get Off in Boston". 
It will be shown on that 
Channel Monday, Jan. 14 at 
7:30 p.m., Wednesday, Jan. 16 
at 6:30 p.m. and Friday, Jan. 18 
at 7:30 p.m. 

The film will also be seen on 
Channel 44 Jan. 14 and Jan. 18 
at 9:30 p.m. 

"We are pleased that Channel 
2 has taken an interest in 
Quincy's history and wants to 
share our heritage with the 
people of the entire area," said 
Mayor Walter J. Hannon. 

"Where to Get Off in Boston" 
describes a series of trips in and 
around Boston which can be 
taken on the MBTA trains. It 
features Mr. and Mrs. Ed Driscoll 
of Boston as the "tourists". 
Driscoll is a writer for the 
Boston Globe. 

Produced by Fred Barzyk and 
Henry Morgenthau, the "Where 
to Get Off in Boston" programs 
tell what people can see and do 
in their leisure time by taking 
the MBTA. 

The filming in Quincy took 
place at the MBTA station in 
Quincy Center, City Hall, the 
United First Parish Church, the 
Adams Birthplaces, and the 
Adams National Historic Site. 

A copy of the film is being 
presented to the city, according 
to Mayor Hannon, by Channel 2. 
It will be used to develop 
interest in the city's history. 



LEGAL NOTICES 



LEGAL NOTICES 



Rrownell Asks 
Speed Cut 

On Sea Street 

Rep. Thomas F. Brownell 
[D-Quincy] has asked Mayor 
Walter J. Hannon to take steps 
to curb speeding on Sea St. 
between Quincy Shore Drive and 
Palmer St. 

On behalf of Our Lady of 
Good Counsel Parish Council, he 
asked that the area be posted for 
a 30 mile per hour speed limit, 
that five crosswalks be painted 
green and white, and that the 
crosswalks be better illuminated 
to provide better protection for 
pedestrians. 

"The density of schools and 
churches in this area demands 
that we have the best possible 
road safety program available for 
the protection of our citizens," 
Brownell said. He cited the 
increase in pedestrian and 
automobile accidents in the area 
after the road was repaved. 

Robert Corwin 

Chairman 
Chess Drive 

Robert Corwin of 36 Dale 
Ave., Quincy has been appointed 
chairman of the membership 
drive of the Massachusetts Chess 
A sso ciation in the 
Quincy-Brain tree- Weymouth 
area. 

Corwin, a regional vice 
president of the U.S. Chess 
Federation, is a teacher at 
Norwood Junior High. 

The Massachusetts Chess 
Association is the state affiliate 
of the U.S. Chess Federation. 
Members receive bi-monthly 
Chess Horizons magazine and are 
eligible to play in tournaments 
throughout the state. 



order no. 9 

ORDERED: 



Thursday, Jan ua ry 10, 1974 Quincy Sun Page 25 
LEGAL NOTICES LEGAL NOTICES 



CITY OI QUINCY 
IN COUNCIL 



January 7, 1974 



Be it ordained by the City Council of the City of Quincy, as follows: 

That the Revised Ordinances of the City of Quincy, 1960, as amended, be 
further amended as follows: 

In Chapter 2, Administration. Article XXV. Salaries. Section 131. Titles of 
Positions and Salary Grades. Strike out the following: 



TITLE OF POSITION 



SALARY GRADE 




7 

13 
13 
13 

7 

7 

6 
14 
11 
12W 

5 

4 

6 

5A 

4 

6 

4A 

7 

7W 

5A 

8 

13A 
13A 
13A 
I3A 
I3A 
1 3A 
I3A 
15 
15 
15 
15 

1 2WH 
1 2WH 

15 



Accountant Clerk 
Accountant [Auditor] 
Accountant [Public Works | 
Accountant [Water Dept.| 
Accounting Machine Operator-Auditor 
Accounting Machine Operator-Retirement 
Addressograph Operator 
Assistant to Commissioner of Public Works 
Assistant Medical Record Librarian 
Carpenter-Public Works 
Clerk 

Clerk-Messenger 
Clerk Stenographer 
Clerk-Typist 

Clerk Typist and Messenger-Hospital 
Clerk Typist and Accounting Machine Operator - 

Hospital 
Community Resources Coordinator 
Dental Assistant-Health 
Duplicating Machine Operator 
Duplicating Machine Operator-Auditor 
Electrocardiograph Technician-Health 
Foreman-Forestry 

Foreman-Highway and Sanitary and Timekeeper 
Eoreman-Highway and Sanitary 
Foreman-Park 
Foreman-Sewer 
Foreman-Water 
foreman-Public Burial Places 
General I oreman-l orestry 
General foreman-Highway 
General I oreman-Scwer 
General foreman-Traffic Signs and Signals 

| Paint Shop | 
Hospital Maintcnanceman-Pipefitter 
Hospital Maintcnanccman-Sign-fittcr 
General Water Systems foreman 
General loreman-Timekccper-Highway and 

Sanitary 15 

Head Carpenter j 4\v 

Head Clerk 12 

Head Clerk-Health. 13 

Head Clerk-Assessors 13 

Head Clerk-Collectors \2 

Head Painter-Equipment Maintenance |4\V 

Hospital Telephone Operator 6 

Legal Secretary 11-1 A 

Motor Equipment Repairman MW 

Office Manager-Water Dept. 14 

Painter 12W 

Principal Admitting Clerk 10 

Principal Clerk 9 

Principal Clerk and Secretary to Department Head 9 

Principal Clerk and Secretary to Director 9 

Principal Clerk -Vital Statistics 1 1 

Principal Medical Stenographer 1 1 

Project Manager Relocation Director 14B 

Secretary to License Board 1 OB 

Secretary to Council 1 1- 1 A 

Secretary to City Clerk 8 

Secretary to Mayor 1 1-1 A 

Secretary to Police Chief 1 1-1 A 

Senior Accountant-Auditor 15 

Senior Clerk 7 

Senior Clerk-Stenographer 8 

Senior Clerk-Typist 7 

Senior Medical Stenographer 9 

Senior Statistical Machine Operator 7 

Senior Statistical Machine Operator-Hospital 8 

Statistical Machine Operator-Hospital 6 

Statistician-Hospital 14-AB 

Water Systems Maintenance Man 9WA1 

Welder 12 

Working foreman-Motor Equipment Repairman 1 3A 

and in place thereof add the following: 



TITLE OF POSITION 



SALARY GRADE 



Account Clerk 

Accountant [Auditor] 

Accountant [Public Works] 

Accountant [Water Department) 

Accounting Machine Operator-Auditor 

Accounting Machine Operator 

Addressograph Operator 

Assistant to Commissioner of Public Works 

Assistant Medical Record Librarian 

Administrative Assistant to Mayor 

Business Manager [ Library | 

Carpenter-Public Works 

Clerk 

Clerk-Messenger 

Clerk-Stenographer 

Clerk-Typist 

Clerk-Typist and Messenger-Hospital 

Clerk-Typist and Accounting Machine 

Operator-Hospital 
Community Resources Coordinator 
Dental Assistant-Health Department 
Duplicating Machine Operator 
Duplicating Machine Operator-Auditor 
Electrocardiograph Technician [E KG | -Health 

Department 
Foreman-Forestry 

Eoreman-Highway and Sanitary and Timekeeper 
I •■oreman-Highway and Sanitary 
Foreman-Park 
I oreman-Sewer 
Foreman-Water 
Foreman-Public Burial Places 
General Foreman-Forestry 
General Eoreman-Highway 
General I oreman-Scwer 

General 1 oreman-Timekecper-Highway-Sanitaiy 
General Foreman-Traffic Signs and Signals 

[Paint Sjiop[ 
General Water Systems foreman 
Head Carpenter 
Head Clerk 
Head Clerk-Assessors 
Head Clerk-Collectors 
Head Clerk-Health 

Head Painter-Equipment Maintenance 
Hospital Maintcnanceman-Pipefitter 
Hospital Maintenanceman-Sign Painter 
Hospital Telephone Operator 
Legal Secretary 
Meter Maid 

Motor Equipment Operator-Heavy-Sweeper 
Motor Equipment Repairman 
Office Manager-Water Dept. 
Painter 

Principal Admitting Clerk 
Principal Clerk 

Principal Clerk and Secretary to Dept. Head 
Principal Clerk and Secretary to Director Hospital 
Principal Clerk-Vital Statistics 
Principal Clerk-Fire 
Principal Medical Stenographer 
Relocation and Property Agent 
Secretary to City Clerk 
Secretary to Council 
Secretary to License Board 
Secretary to Mayor 
Secretary to Police Chief 
Senior Accountant-Auditor 
Senior Clerk 
Senior Clerk-Stenograph 
Senior Clerk-Typist 
Senior Medical Stenographer 
Senior Statistical Machine Operator-Hospital 
Senior Statistical Machine Operator 
Statistician-Hospital 
Statistical Machine Operator-Hospital 
Water Systems Junior Craftsman 
Working Eorcman-Wclder-Public Works 
Working Foreman-Motor Equipment Repairman 



8 
14 
14 
14 

8 

7 

7 
15 
12 

14-A-3 
12-A-l 
13W 
6 
5 
7 

6A 
5 

7 
5 A 

8 

8W 

6A 

9 

14A 
14A 
14A 
I4A 
I4A 
14A 
14A 
16A 
16A 
16A 
16A 

16A 

16A 

15WA 

13 

14 

13 

14 

15WA 

12W 

I2W 
7 

12A1 

4W 

12W 

5WA 

15 

13W 

11 

10 

10 

10 

12 

14 

12 

14 B 

9 

12-A-l 
II -A 
12-A-l 
12A1 
16 
8 
9 
8 

10 
9 
8 

15B 
7 

9WA1 
15WA 
14A 



1/10/74 



A True copy Attest: 

John M. Gillis 

Clerk of Council 



Political Equivalent Of War' 
S.S. UN Council Topic Tonight 



Gene Sharp,' Professor of 
Sociology and Political Science, 
Southeastern Massachusetts 
University will speak at a 
meeting of the United Nations 
Council of the South Shore 
Thursday, Jan. 10 at 8 p.m. in 
the Parish Hall of the Church of 
the Presidents, Quincy Square. 

He will discuss "The Political 
Equivalent of War". 

Professor Sharp has made an 
intensive study of "The Politics 
of Non-Violent Action" which is 

the title of a book of 928 pages 
which he wrote when he was a 
Research Fellow at the Center 



for International Affairs, 
Harvard. 

He stresses nonviolent action 
should not be confused with 
pacifism. It is nothing new, for 
the Scandinavians in World War 
II used it: Gandhi used it in 
India, and the meat boycott of 
U.S. housewives is a recent 
example, he notes. 

Although most Americans are 
not aware of this, it was even 
used in the American 
Revolution. The Swedish 
Defense Department is 
considering nonviolent action as 
one means of National Defense 



and has committed a small part 
of its budget to an investigation 
of it. 

Some American army officers 
are interested, and Sharp's book 
has been reviewed in military 
journals. The members of the 
United Nations Council of the 
South Shore are looking forward 
to hearing a speaker who has an 
original view of World Affairs. 

A question period will follow 
the talk. The meeting is open to 
the public and admission is free, 
but there is a charge for the 
dinner at 7 p.m. 



COMMOKWEALTH OF 

MASSACHUSETTS 

Norfolk, ss. Probate Court 

No. 199.532 

To all prisons interested in the 
estate of MARIE C. DiANTONIO 
late of Quincy in said County, 
deceased. 

A petition has been presented to 
said Court praying that ANN 
DiANTONIO of Quincy in the 
County of Norfolk be appointed 
administratrix of said estate without 
giving a surety on her bond. 

If you desire to object thereto you 
or your attorney should file a written 
appearance in said Court at Dedham 
before ten o'clock in the forenoon on 
the sixth day of February 1974, the 
return day of this citation. 

Witness, ROBERT M. FORD, 
Esquire, First Judge of said Court, 
this second day of January 1974. 

PAUL C. GAY, 

Register. 
1/10-17-24/74 




Page 26 Quincy Sun Thursday, January 10, 1974 



LEGAL NOTICE 



COMMONWEALTH OF 
MASSACHUSETTS 

Norfolk, ss. Probate Court 

No. 199,541 

To all persons interested in the 
estate of LOUIS G. DiBONA late of 
Quincy in said County, deceased. 
And to the Attorney General of said 
Commonwealth, if required. 

A petition has been presented to 
said Court for probate of a certain 
instrument purporting to be the last 
will of said deceased by RUTH A. 
DiBONA of Quincy in the County of 
Norfolk praying that she be 
appointed executrix thereof without 
giving a surety on her bond. 

If you desire to object thereto you 
or your attorney should file a written 
appearance in said Court at Dcdham 
before ten o'clock in the forenoon on 
the sixth day of February 1974, the 
return day of this citation. 

Witness. ROBERT M. FORI). 
Fsquire. First Judge of said Court, 
this second day of January. 1974. 

PAUL C. GAY, 
Register. 
1 /TO- 17-24/74 

COMMONWEALTH 01 

MASSACHUSETTS 

Norfolk, ss. Probate Court 

No. D-33654 

To PATRICIA A YEUNG of Parts 
Unknown. 

A libel has been presented to said 
Court by your husband, DAVID Y. 
YEUNG Of Quincy in the County of 
Norfolk praying that a divorce from 
the bond of matrimony between 
himself and you be decreed for the 
cause of cruel and abusive treatment. 

If you desire to object thereto, 
you or your attorney should file a 
written appearance in said Court at 
Dcdham within twenty-one days 
from the twentieth day of March 
1974. the return day of this citation. 

Witness, ROBERT M. FORD, 
Fsquire, First Judge of said Court, 
this twenty-first dav of December 
1973. 

PAUL C. GAY, 
Register. 
1 10 17-24/74 

AN NUAL MEETING 

The Annual Meeting of the 

Members of Colonial Federal Savings 
and Loan Association of Quincy. will 
be held on January 16. 1974 at 4:30 
P.M. at the office of the Association. 
15 Beach Street, in Quincy, 
Massachusetts, for the election of 
directors, for receiving reports of the 
officers and for the transaction of 
am business that legally may conic 
before the meeting. 

Colonial federal Savings and 

Loan Association of Quincv 

Roy L. Sidelinger. 

Secret a r\ . 

1 3-10 "4 

SHAREHOLDERS MEETING 

A meeting of the Shareholders of the 
Shipbuilders Cooperative Bank will 
be held on Monday. January 21. 
1974. at 4:30 P.M. at the bank's 
office. 1 Granite Street, Quincy, for 
the purpose of electing directors, a 
shareholders' clerk, to act on an 
amendment to Article 1 1 of the 
by-laws concerning the 
Indemnification of Directors, 
Officers. Employees and other 
Agents of the bank, and to act on 
any other business requiring the 
attention of the Shareholders. 

Francis X. McCauley 
Shareholders' Clerk 
1/10/74 




LEGAL NOTICES 

COMMONWEALTH OF 

MASSACHUSETTS 

Norfolk, ss. Probate Court 

No. 175,274 

To all persons interested in the 
estate of JAMES J. McDONALD late 
of Quincy in said County, deceased. 
And to the Attorney General of said 
Commonwealth, if required. 

The executrix of the will of said 
deceased has presented to said Court 
for allowance her first and final 
account. 

If you desire to object thereto you 
or your attorney should file a written 
appearance in said Court at Dedham 
before ten o'clock in the forenoon on 
the twenty-third day of January 
1974, the return day of this citation. 

Witness, ROBERT M. FORD, 
Esquire, First Judge of said Court, 
this nineteenth day of December 
1973. 

PAUL C. GAY, 
Register. 
1/3-10-17/74 

COMMONWEALTH 01 

MASSACHUSETTS 

Norfolk, ss. Probate Court 

No. 199,025 

To all persons interested in the 
estate of SABAT1NO 
GIANNANGELI late of Quincy in 
said County, deceased. And to the 
Attorney General of said 
Commonwealth, if required. 

A petition has been presented to 
said Court for probate of a certain 
instrument purporting to be the last 
will of said deceased by JOSEPH S. 
CIPOLLA of Quincy in the County 
of Norfolk and BENEDETTO 
PAONE of Quincy in the County of 
Norfolk praying that they be 
appointed executors thereof without 
giving a surety on their bond. 

If you desire to object thereto you 
or your attorney should file a written 
appearance in said Court at Dedham 
before ten o'clock in the forenoon on 
the sixth day of February 1974, the 
return day of this citation. 

Witness. ROBERT M. LORD. 
Fsquire. First Judge of said Court, 
this twenty-sixth dav of December 
1073 

PAUL C. GAY, 
Register. 
1 10-17-24 74 

COMMONWEALTH OF 
MASSACHUSETTS 

Norfolk, ss. Probate Court 

No. D-33600 

To JOHN P. BARTER of 600 
Lindell Boulevard, Delray in the 
State of Florida. 

A libel has been presented to said 
Court by your wife .11 ANTM D. 
BARTER of Quincy in the County of 
Norfolk praying that a divorce from 
the bond of matrimony between 
herself and you be decreed for the 
cause of cruel and abusive treatment 
and praying for alimony and for 
custody of and allowance for minor 
children. 

If you desire to object thereto, 
you or your attorney should file a 
written appearance in said Court at 
Dedham within twenty-one days 
from the sixth day of March 1974, 
the return dav of this citation. 

Witness, ROBERT M. LORD, 
Fsquire, First Judge of said Court, 
this thirteenth day of December 
1973. 

PAUL C. GAY, 
Register. 
12/27 1/3-10/74 



SUBSCRIPTION FORM 



LEGAL NOTICES 



COMMONWEALTH OF 

MASSACHUSETTS 

Norfolk, ss. Probate Court 

No. D-33565 

To HERBERT J. PILKINGTON of 
Parts Unknown. 

A libel has been presented to said 
Court by your wife ROSEMARY A. 
PILKINGTON of Quincy in the 
County of Norfolk praying that a 
divorce from the bond of matrimony 
between herself and you be decreed 
for the cause of cruel and abusive 
treatment and further praying that 
she be allowed to resume her maiden 
name, to wit: ROSEMARY A. 
NORCOTT. 

If you desire to object thereto, 
you or your attorney should tile a 
written appearance in said Court at 
Dedham within twenty-one days 
from the thirteenth day of March 
1974, the return day of this citation. 

Witness, ROBERT M. LORD, 
Esquire. First Judge of said Court, 
this thirteenth day of December 
1973. 

PAUL C. GAY, 
Register. 
12/27 1/3-10/74. 

COMMONWEALTH OF 

MASSACHUSETTS 

Norfolk, ss. Probate Court 

No. 199,428 

To all persons interested in the 
estate of JOHN GOULD late of 
Quincy in said County, deceased. 
And to the Attorney General of said 
Commonwealth, if required. 

A petition has been presented to 
said Court for probate of a certain 
instrument purporting to be the last 
will of said deceased by MARJORIE 
G. HUNTINGTON of Quincy in the 
County of Norfolk praying that she 
be appointed executrix thereof 
without giving a surety on her bond. 

If you desire to object thereto you 
or your attorney should file a written 
appearance in said Court at Dedham 
before ten o'clock in the forenoon on 
the twenty-third day of January 
1974. the return day of this citation. 

Witness. RQBERT M. LORD, 
Esquire, First Judge of said Court, 
this seventeenth day of December 
1973. 

PAUL C. GAY, 
Register. 
12/27 1 3-10 74 



COMMONWEALTH 01 
MASSACHUSETTS 

Norfolk, ss. Probate Court 

No. 199.450 

To all persons interested in the 
estate of I Till L M. SMITH late of 
Quincy in said County, deceased. 
And to the Attorney General of said 
Commonwealth, if required. 

A petition has been presented to 
said Court for probate of a certain 
instrument purporting to be the last 
will of said deceased by MARION 
AUITERO of Quincy in the County 
of Norfolk praying that she be> 
appointed executrix thereof without 
giving a surety on her bond. 

If you desire to object thereto you 
or your attorney should file a written 
appearance in said Court at Dedham 
before ten o'clock in the forenoon on 
the sixth day of February 1974, the 
return day of this citation. 

Wjtness, ROBERT M. LORD, 
Esquire. First Judge of said Court, 
this second day of January 1974. 

PAUL C. GAY, 
Register. 
1/10-17-24/74 




FILL OUT THIS SUBSCRIPTION BLANK AND MAIL 

TO TNE QUINCY SUN 1101 HANCOCK ST.; QUINCY 02119 

52 ISSUES FOR 1360 
NAME-— " 



STREET 
CITY 



STATE 



ZIP COPE. 




CHECK ONE OF TWO BOXES BELOW 
[ ] ENCLOSED IS MY CHECK FOR $3.50 
[ ] PLEASE BILL ME FOR $3.50 
OUT OF STATE $4.50 



;*i(*M*i(*: 



LEGAL NOTICES 

COMMONWEALTH OF 

MASSACHUSETTS 

Norfolk, ss. Probate Court 

No. 199,426 

To all persons interested in the 
estate of FLORENCE KING COPE 
also known as FLORENCE K. COPE 
late of Quincy in said County, 
deceased. And to the Attorney 
General of said Commonwealth, if 
required. 

A petition has been presented to 
said Court for probate of a certain 
instrument purporting to be the last 
will of said deceased by THE FIRST 
NATIONAL BANK OF BOSTON, 
successor in title to OLD COLONY 
TRUST COMPANY, of Boston in the 
County of Suffolk praying that it be 
appointed executor thereof without 
giving a surety on its bond. 

If you desire to object thereto you 
or your attorney should file a written 
appearance in said Court at Dedham 
before ten o'clock in the forenoon on 
the twenty-third day of January 
1974, the return day of this citation. 

Witness, ROBERT M. FORD, 
Esquire, First Judge of said Court, 
this seventeenth day of December 
1973. 

PAUL C. GAY, 
Register. 
12/27 1/3-10/74 

COMMONWEALTH OF 
MASSACHUSETTS 

Norfolk, ss. Probate Court 

No. 199,567 

To S. ALICE BARRON also 
known as ALICE BARRON of 
Quincy in the County of Norfolk, 
and to her heirs apparent or 
presumptive and to the Massachusetts 
Department of Mental Health. And 
to the Attorney General of said 
Commonwealth, if required. 

A petition has been presented to 
said Court alleging that the aforesaid 
S. ALICE BARRON has become 
incapacitated by reason of advanced 
age - mental weakness - to properly 
care for her property and praying 
that ELIZABETH G.: PITNOI of 
Quincy in said County, or some other 
suitable person, be appointed 
conservator of her property, 

If you desire to object thereto. 
you or your attorney should file a 
written appearance in said Court at 
Dedham before ten o'clock in the 
forenoon on the sixth day of 
February 1974. the return day of this 
citation. 

Witness. ROBERT M. LORD. 
Esquire. first Judge of said Court, 
this second dav of January. 1974. 

PAUL C. GAY, 
Register. 
1 10-17-24 74 

COMMONWEALTH OF 

MASSACHUSETTS 

Norfolk, ss. Probate Court 

No. 199.300 

To all persons interested in the 
estate of GIUSEPPE MARINELL1 
late of Quincy in said County, 
deceased. And to the Attorney 
General of said Commonwealth, if 
required. 

A petition has been presented to 
said Court for probate of a certain 
instrument purporting to be the last 
will of said deceased by PETFR 
MACDONALD of Quincy in the 
County of Norfolk and JOHN 
HENDERSON LINSLEY of Cohasset 
in the County of Norfolk praying 
that they be appointed executors 
thereof without giving a surety on 
their bonds. 

If you desire to object thereto you 
or your attorney should file a written 
appearance in said Court at Dedham 
before ten o'clock in the forenoon on 
the twenty-third day of January 
1974, the return day of this citation. 

Witness, ROBERT M. FORD, 
Esquire, First Judge of said Court, 
this seventeenth day of December 
1973. 

PAUL C. GAY, 
Register. 
12/27 1/3-10/74. 



For Home 
Delivery 

Call 
471-3100 



LEGAL NOTICES 

COMMONWEALTH OF 

MASSACHUSETTS 

Norfolk, ss. Probate Court 

No. 196,726 

To all persons interested in the 
estate of LEO E. MULLIN late of 
Quincy in said County, deceased. 
And to the Attorney General of said 
Commonwealth, if required. 

A petition has been presented to 
said Court, praying that STEPHEN T. 
KEEFE, JR. of Quincy in the County 
of Norfolk be appointed 
administrator with the will annexed 
of said estate not already 
administered, without giving a surety 
on his bond. 

If you desire to object thereto you 
i or your attorney should file a written 
appearance in said Court at Dedham 
before ten o'clock in the forenoon on 
the thirtieth day of January 1974, 
the return day of this citation. 

Witness, ROBERT M. FORD, 
Esquire, First Judge of said Court, 
this twenty-first day of December 
1973. 

PAUL C. GAY, 
• Register. 
1/3-10-17/74 

COMMONWEALTH OF 
MASSACHUSETTS 

Norfolk, ss. Probate Court 

No. 199,376 

To all persons interested in the 
estate of MYLES A. McDONOUGH 
late of Quincy in said County, 
deceased. And to the Attorney 
General of said Commonwealth, if 
required. 

A petition has beep presented to 
said Court for probate of a certain 
instrument purporting to be the last 
will of said deceased by ELSIE K. 
McDONOUGH of Quincy in the 
County of Norfoik praying that she 
be appointed executrix thereof 
without giving a surety on her bond. 

If you desire to object thereto you 
or your attorney should file a written 
appearance in said Court at Dedham 
before ten o'clock in the forenoon on 
the sixteenth day of January 1974, 
the return day of this citation. 

Witness, ROBERT M. FORD, 

Esquire, First Judge of said Court, 

this eleventh da/ oTbecemb'efT973. 

PAUL C. GAY, 

Register. 

12/27 1/3-10/74 

COMMONWEALTH 01 
MASSACHUSETTS 

Norfolk, ss. Probate Court 

No. 199.140 

To all persons interested in the 
estate of HILARY T. MELLYN late 
of Quincy in said County, deceased. 

A petition has been presented to 
said Court praying that ARTHUR R. 
MELLYN of Quincy in the County 
of Norfolk be appointed 
administrator of said estate without 
giving a surety on his bond. 

If you desire to object thereto you 
or your attorney should file a written 
appearance in said Court at Dedham 
before ten o'clock in the forenoon on 
the sixteenth day of January 1974, 
the return day of this citation. 

Witness, ROBERT M. FORD, 
Enquire, First Judge of said Court, 
this twenty-ninth day of November 
1973. 

PAUL C. GAY, 
Register. 
12/27 1/3-10/74 

COMMONWEALTH OF 

MASSACHUSETTS 

Norfolk, ss. Probate Court 

No. 199,355 

To all persons interested in the 
estate of JAMES H. ROGERS late of 
Quincy in said County, deceased. 
And to the Attorney General of said 
Commonwealth, if required. 

A petition has been presetted to 
said Court for probate of a certain 
instrument purporting to be the last 
will of said deceased by FRANCIS A. 
ROGERS of Weymouth in the 
County of Norfolk praying that he be 
appointed executor thereof without 
giving a surety on his bond. 

If you desire to object thereto you 
or your attorney should file a written 
appearance in said Court at Dedham 
before ten o'clock in the forenoon on 
the sixteenth day of January 1974, 
the return day of this citation. 

Witness, ROBERT M. FORD, 

Esquire, First Judge of said Court, 

this eleventh day of December 1973. 

PAUL C. GAY, 

Register. 

12/27 1/3-10/74 



Thursday, January 10, 1974 Quincy Sun Page 27 





LEGAL NOTICES 



COMMONWEALTH OF 
MASSACHUSETTS 

Norfolk, ss. Probate Court 

No. 114,954 

To all persons interested in the 
estate of TERESA DiPRlSCO late of 
Quincy in said County, deceased, and 
to JOHN A. HUTCH1NS of 
Weymouth in the County of Norfolk, 
trustee, who has not resigned. And to 
the Attorney General of said 
Commonwealth, if required. 

A petition has been presented to 
sjid Court praying that JOHN A. 
HUTCHINS be removed from his 
office as trustee, and that WILLIAM 
U. LAMPREY of Braiutree in the 
County of Norfolk or some other 
suitable person, be appointed his 
successor. 

If you desire to object thereto you 
or your attorney should file a written 
appearance in said Court at Dcdham 
before ten o'clock in the forenoon on 
the twenty-third day of January 
1974, the return day of this citation 
and you said JOHN A. HUTCHINS 
are cited to appear in said Court at 
10:00 a.m. on said return day to 
resign. 

Witness, ROBEP T M. FORD, 
Esquire, First Jud k ,. said Court, 
this nineteenth day of December 
1973. 

PAUL G. GAY, 
Register. 
1/3-10-17/74 

COMMONWEALTH OF 

MASSACHUSETTS 

Norfolk, ss. Probate Court 

No. 199.421 

To all persons interested in the 
estate of DEBORAH HOFFMAN late 
of Quincy in said County, deceased. 

A petition has been presented to 
said Court praying that ALFRED S. 
SWANSON of Weymouth in the 
County of Norfolk be appointed 
administrator of said estate without 
giving a surety on his bond. 

If you desire to object thereto you 
or your attorney should file a written 
appearance in said Court at Dedham 
before ten o'clock in the forenoon on 
the twenty-third day of January 
1974, the return day of this citation. 

Witness, ROBERT M. FORD, 
Esquire. First Judge of said Court, 
this nineteenth day of December 
1973. 

PAUL C. GAY, 
Register. 
1/3-10-17/74 

COMMONWEALTH OF 
MASSACHUSETTS 

Norfolk, ss. Probate Court 

No. 199,437 



To ANNIE M. RIZZI of Quincy in 
the County of Norfolk, and to her 
heirs apparent or presumptive and to 
the Massachusetts Department of 
Mental Health. And to the Attorney 
General of said Commonwealth, if 
required. 

A petition has been presented to 
said Court alleging that said ANNLE 
M. RIZZI has become incapacitated 
by reason of advanced age, mental 
weakness, to properly care for her 
property and praying that NORMAN 
J- RIZZI of San Francisco in the 
State of California, or some other 
suitable person, be appointed 
conservator of her property. 

If you desire to object thereto, 
you or your attorney should file a 
written appearance in said Court at 
Dedham before ten o'clock in the 
forenoon on the thirtieth day of 
January 1974, the return day of this 
citation. 

Witness, ROBERT M. FORD, 
Esquire, First Judge of said Court, 
this twenty-first day of December 
1973. 

PAUL C. GAY, 

i/., .« Register, 

1/3-10-17/74 



Save Gas and Money ... 
shop locally. 



HELP WANTED 



HELP WANTED 



SERVICES OFFERED 



SERVICES OFFERED 



MACHINE SHOP 

Op«nlng§ on 2nd and 3rd shifts for people to »«tup and op«r- 
•i« modarn machina tools, to perform milling, boring mill pre- 
cision drilling and similar operations. These positions are worth 
over $5 OO per hour tor qualified candidates. Previous experi- 
ence with numerically controlled machina tools desirable but 
we will consider people with machine shop experience, 
vve also haye a Day Shltt opening tor a Milling Machine opera- 
tor to setup and operate a Horizontal Miller. Wide variety of 
work and excellent earnings potential 

MACHINE ASSEMBLY 

Our expanding Assembly 0«pt. has Day Shift openings for 
tnrpe more peopl* capable of custom building complex pack- 
nnjMO, and bottling machinery from blueprints. We will train if 
necessary, people *ilh machine shop or related background. 

DRAFTING 

W« currently have openings for one Electrical Draftsman and 
tour Mechan'cal Draftsmen. Permanent diversified work Will 
train high scnool grads with substantial schooling in mechani- 
cal drafting. Bring samples of drawings with you. 



FLOORS & WALLS 

Linoleum, ceramic tile, formica, sold & installed. Hardwood 
floors laul, sanded and finished. Many specials in our store. 
Wall Tile, carpeting, Armstrong floor coverings of all types 
at reduced prices. 

ART FLOOR COMPANY 

1 15 Sagamore St., North Quincy 

328-6970 

Open 8:00- 5:00 Dull) 
Closed Sat. 



MUSIC 



PHOTOGRAPHY 



SOUTH SHORE 



People who travel North or West of Boston Investigate these 
opportunities to save gas. avoid transportation difficulties and 

IISJ,L*Y* " m " W ? " re n . 0,ed ,or our •'•bil'ty of employment. 
Excellent wages and benefits. ~ '"".'. 

Apply Personnel Oept. 

PNEUMATIC SCALE CORP. 

24 Holbrook Rd., North Quincy 

(Nr. North Quincy MBTA Station and S.E. Xway) 

An Equal Opportunity Employer 



GUITAR LESSONS by 
experienced teacher at your 
home. Prefer beginners. Children 
7-15 years, housewives. 
References and information, 



479-5839 



1/10 



T.V. 



TECHNICIANS 

For road work in South Shore 
area. Salary arranged. 

Call 

MAJOR T.V. 

471-8525 
1/10 

FOB SALE 

MATTRESSES 

MATTRESSES • -Immediate 
Delivery. Can you use 
exceptionally good buys on 
king, queen, full or twin 
mattresses, beds, trundles, 
bunks at discount. Brand 
names, Sealy, Eclipse, 
Slumberland, Englander, etc. 
Bedding has been our only 
business for over 20 years. 
Open eves., Siesta Sleep 
Shops, 221 Parkingway, 
Quincy, Corner of School 
Street. 

T.F. 



Magic Chef gas stove with heater. 
White. Like New. 328-1810 

1/10 



REAL ESTATE 
EASTWAREHAM 

Energy crisis forces owner to sell , 
or rent. New Swiss Chalet, fully 
equipped. Lakeview. Low taxes. 
Furnished or not. 12' X ,42': 
sundeck. Call weekends. 1 - 
295-7225, Mr. Gaines. ;i/3, 



PART-TIME 

Earn $75.00 to $100.00 weekly 
based on your productivity. 
Addressing letters for 
businessmen in your area, in your 
spare time. Begin immediately. 
Details send stamped addressed 
envelope to Johnson Letter Co., 
152 W. 42nd St., New York City, 
10036. 

1/10 



AUTOS 



'71 - LeMans 2 -door hardtop, 
51,995. Small V8, power 
steering, automatic, vinyl top. 
Immaculate condition. 
Fratus Pontiac 

479 Washington St. 

Quincy, 773-1070 1/10 



71 PONTIAC CATAL1NA 

4-Door hardtop. $1,888. Power 

steering, brakes. Immaculate. 

Fratus Pontiac 

479 Washington St. 

Quincy, 773-1070 

1/10 



'70 PONTIAC CATALINA 2-door 
hardtop, $1,495. Power steering, 
brakes, automatic, vinyl top. 
Immaculate. 

FratUI Pontiac 

479 Washington St. 

Quincy. 773-1070 1/10 



18 and 20 miles per gallon. 1966 
Mercury Comet 2-Door vinyl 
hardtop. Automatic, Radio, 
Heater. Clean inside and out. No 
dents. Call after 4. $495. 
479-6968. 

1/10 



CARPENTRY 

Licensed, builder, 26 years 
experience. Repairs, remodeling & 
additions. No job too small, free 
estimates. Charles J. Ross, 
479-3755. 



GENERAL CARPENTRY 

Remodelling, Repairs, Additions. 
Bathrooms, Kitchens, Playrooms, 
etc. Call evenings. 

John D. Mignosa 
. 479-4865 2 /7 

1ST 
APPLIANCE REPAIRS 

Washers, dryers, dishwashers, 

electric ranges. Whirlpool, 

Kcnmore, G.K., Westinghouse, 

Maytag. Kitchenaid. 24-hour 



GETTING MARRIED? Bill 
Johnston will photograph your 
wedding for $95. Complete 
coverage. Announcement photos 
free. Call days 696-1704, 

Eves 328-1423. 1/24 



CHILD CARE 

Rent-A-Parent. Young married 
South Shore couples will care 
for your home and children 
while you enjoy your 
vacation. Interviews and 
References available. 

UNIVERSITY 

HOME SERVICES 

961-1616 RANDOLPH 
449-3590 NEEDHAM 

T.F. 

• FUEL OIL 



DOYLE A LONG 

FUEL OIL 

A 

HEATING EQUIPMENT 

624 Hancock St.. Woilaston 

Tel: 472-4800 T.F. 



HALL FOR RENT 



North Quincy K. of C, Building, 5 
Hollis Ave. For information 
please call, 

328-5552-328-0087- 
328-9822 

T.F. 



service. 



'69 CHEVROLET IMP ALA 
4-door, air-conditioned, power 
steering and brakes. $1,350. 
Immaculate. 

Fratus Pontiac 

479 Washington St. 

Quincy, 773-1070 1/10 



PAUL BENNETT, 
288-0663. l ' 24 

KEYS MADE 



Locksmith on Duty 

GRANITE CITY 

HARDWARE 

1617 Hancock St., Quincy 

479-5454 



T.F. 



WEAVER 
FOREIGN AUTO 

Service Certified Jaguar-Rolls 
technician. 26 yrs experience 
servicing all foreign cars. 
Quality work guaranteed 
843-8663 T.F. 

INSURANCE 

HOME OWNERS RATES ARE 
LOWER: If you have a .basic 
Homeowner's policy for $20,000 
and are paying more than $62.00 
a year, call 282-4412 at once. 
Rutstcin Insurance Agency. 



*\u7. 



C:*> 



Index for 
Classified;^ 

A Services 

B For Sale •;■._* ' ;:'/; 

C Autos 

D Boats :.•", ::,'.' 

E For Rent . 

F..... Help Wanted ;;, : ; 

G ....Pets, Livestock."/ 

H Lost and Found/ 

I Real Estate for Sale 

J Real Estate Wanted 

K .Miscellaneous 

L Work Wanted 

M Antiques 

N .Coins and Stamps 

O Rest Homes 

P Instruction 



MAIL TO: QUINCY SUN 1601 Hancock St, Quincy 02169 
WANT ADS PAYABLE IN ADVANCE...cash must accompany order 
Enclosed is,, for the following ad to run___times 



COPY:, 



Kites: 

Contract rite: 



$2.25 for one week, up to 20 words, 5V each additional word. 

$2.00 per week, up to 20 words for three or more insertions of 

the same ad. 

No refund will be made at this contract rate in the event of 

cancellation. 

Deadline: Friday 5 P.M. for the following weeks publication. 
Please include your phone number in ad. 



Page 28 Quincy Sun Thursday, January 10, 1974 



QUINCYjunior college 

SPRING SCHEDULE 1974 Division Of Continuing Education 




EVENING DIVISION 




COMMUNITY EDUCATIONAL 


MONDAY 6:30-9:30 PM 


Semester 
Hours 


SERVICES 




39-EC 202 Principles of Economics II 


3 






30-EN 102 English Composition II 


3 


Community Services [non-credit] courses are open to any person who feels that 


31-FR 102 Elementary French II 


3 


he may profit from them. This credit-free approach to learning makes it possible 


46-LA 202 Business law II 


3 


to continue to learn in an informal and non-competitive environment where 


45-MN 204 Human Relations in Business 


3 


learning is the only interest. 




19-PS 101 General Psychology 


3 






16-PY 102 Principles of Physical Science II 


3 


AT QUINCY JUNIOR COLLEGE ""imber 




49 SS 245 Business Communications 


3 


of Weeks 
MONDAY 7-9 PM 


Tuition 


TUESDAY 6:30-9: 10 PM 




19-010 Dynamics of Human Behavior 10 


C 


41-AC 102 Fundamentals of Accounting II 


3 


1 45-010 Effective Supervision 10 


E 

i -1 


41-AC 202 Intermediate Accounting II 


3 


45-015 Personnel Management 10 


E 
F 
D 
F 

TH A 


42-DP 102 Introduction to Data Processing II 


3 


30-020 Creative Writing 10 


39-EC 102 American Economic History 


3 


19-010 Astrology 1 (6:45-7:45 PM) 7 


51-ED 106 Creative Activities II 


3 


19-011 Astrology II (8-9 PM; 10 


51-ED 165 Remediation of Learning Disabilities 


3 


19-050 Counseling the Troubled Child (1-3 p.m. I 10 


TBA 
G 


30-EN 101 English Composition 1 


3 


10-017 Pre-CalculusMath-(6. 15-9:30) (1 HS Uniti 12 


30-EN 212 American Literature II 


3 






45-ES 101 Introduction to Esperanto 


3 


TUESDAY 7-9 PM 




27-FA 201 Survey of Fine Arts 


3 
3 


10-050 Small Boat Navigation 10 


C 


22-GT 207 United States Judicial Systems 


30-010 English for Everyday Speech and Writing 10 


C 


94-LA 105 Social Health Issues-Law Enforcement 


3 


50-010 Body and Mind Awareness for Women 10 


C 


10-AAA 1 1 2 College Mathematics II 


3 


50-020 Basic Bridge 10 


G 


86-PH 201 Introduction to Public Health 


3 


10-016 Plane Geometry (T & Thi (1 HS Unit) 12 


G 


21-SO202 Contemporary Social Problems 


3 


27-019 Ceramic Workshop 10 


G 


32-SP 202 Intermediate Spanish II 


3 


26-010 Religions of the World 10 


A 


TUESDAY AND THURSDAY 6-8 PM 




WEDNESDAY 7-9 PM 




49-SS 1 1 1 Shorthand 1 


3 
3 
3 
3 


55-010 Career Guidance for the Mature Woman 10 


D 


49-SS 112 Shorthand II 


10-010 Basic Mathematic Review 10 


C 


49-SS 103 Typewriting! 


30-015 A Feminist Look at Women's Fiction 10 


C 


49-SS 104 Typewriting II (8-9:45 PM) 


27-020 Basic Photography 10 


F 


WEDNESDAY 6:30-9: 1 PM 




50-030 Basic Chess 10 


C 


18-BI 102 General Biology II (Lab Mon. 6:30-8:30 PM 1 


4 


43-010 Opportunities in the Travel Industry 10 


G 
C 


54-ED 151 Learning Disabilities of the Adolescent 


3 


19-030 Personal Adjustment & Family Life (1 -3 p.m.] 10 


30-EN 102 English Composition II 


3 






30-EN 1 1 1 Effective Speaking 


3 


THURSDAY 7-9 PM 


S~y 


30-EN 235 A Feminist Look at Women's Literature 


3 


27-0 1 5 Basic Drawing or Painting 1 


G 


27-FA 1 19 Introduction to Photography 


3 


31-010 Conversational French 10 


C 


22-GT 2 1 2 International Relations 


3 


44-010 Fundamentals of Investments 




23-HI 102 United States History II 


3 


in Stocks and Bonds 10 


B 


34-IT102 Elementary Italian II 


3 


46-010 Law for the Layman 10 


B 


19-PS 101 General Psychology 


3 


50-020 Meditation for Yoga 10 


D 


19-PS 201 Child Psychology 


3 


27-012 Women In Art 10 


C 


19-PS 203 Adolescent Psychology 


3 






32-SP 101 Elementary Spanish II 


3 


AT NORTH QUINCY HIGH SCHOOL 




49-SS 235 Secretarial Procedures 


3 


MONDAY 7-9 PM 




THURSDAY 6:30-9:10 PM 




10-015 Algebra 1 (M&^/)(1 HS Unit) 10 


G 


41-AC 101 Fundamentals of Accounting 1 


3 


41-011 Basic Accounting II 12 


C 


41-AC 102 Fundamentals of Accounting II 


3 


34-015 Conversational Italian 1 11 


C 


18-BI 104 Anatomy & Physiology II (Lab. Mon. 6:30-8:30 PM) 4 


30-025 Speed Reading (A) 12 


F 


42-DP 106 Computer Programming II 


3 


49-020 Shorthand-Beginners 1 12 


C 


51-ED 101 Introduction to Early Childhood Education 


3 


49-025 Shorthand-Refresher 12 


C 


30-EN 202 English Composition II 


3 


49-011 Typing-Beginners II 12 


C 


30-EN 102 English Literature II 


3 






27-FA 115 Basic Painting 


3 


WEDNESDAY 7-9 PM 




27-FA 203 Music Appreciation 


3 


30-026 Speed Reading (B) 12 


F 


51 -ED 310 Observation and Participation 


3 


47-010 Real Estate-Preparation for 




22-GT 205 Comparative Government 


3 


the Brokers Exam 10 


F 


23-HI 111 History of Western Civilization II 


3 


47-015 Successful Real Estate Practices 10 


F 


38-JO 101 Introduction to Journalism 


3 


49-010 Typing-Beginners 1 12 


C 


24-LA 109 Police Work with Juvenile Delinquents 


3 


49-015 Typing-Refresher 12 


C 


43-MK 202 Principles of Marketing 


3 


41-010 Basic Accounting 1 12 


C 


19-PS 109 Psychology of Human Motivation 


3 






47-RE 101 Principles of Real Estate 


3 






21 -SO 101 General Sociology 


3 






32-SP 105 Conversational Spanish 


3 


1 TUITION SCHEDULE 


TUITION 






$20 
$22 
$24 








D-S25— Non-Residents 


$30 




$3.00 




$32 
$35 


Tuition per semester credit (Quincy Resident] 


$19.00 




, . $22.00 




$40 








$ 3 


REGISTRATION: MONDAY, 


JAN. 14-TU 


ESDAY, JAN. 15-WEDNESDAY, JAN. 


16 


TIME: 


9 A.M.-4 P.M. - 6 P.M.-8 P.M. 




Write or Call: Quincy Junior College, 34 Coddington St., Quincy 471-2470 


i 


. 


A Division of the Quincy Public Schools 






Vol. 6 No. 18 

Thursday, January 17, 1974 



2ui«cy4 Ottm TifteiUf 1fe(Mfiafitx 






Delinquents Can Lose Driver's License 

$800,000 Owed In 




WINTER WONDERLAND -- Youngsters with their Christmas sleds and toboggans were out in force on 
Second Hill on Furnace Brook Golf Course as last week's snow and ice storms turned Qujncy into a 
winter wonderland worthy of a Currier and Ives print. 

IQuincy Sun Photo by Laban Whittaker] 



Thomas Crane Public Library 

Box 379 

Quincy, Mass, 02169 . 

Clay St. Complex 
Seen Economy Boon 

See Page 13 



Excise Taxes 

Excise tax delinquents owe the city of Quincy some 
$800,000 In back taxes, City Treasurer and Tax Collector 
Robert Foy discloses. 

About $20,000 of that figure goes back to the year 
1969 and $430,000 was accumulated last year, he said. 



Delinquents who fail to pay 
the excise taxes on their 
automobiles face revocation of 
their drivers' licenses under a 
new law enacted by the State 
Legislature in 1973. 

But the situation is far from 
simple. 

Many of those who have not 
yet paid their 1973 excise tax 
are not yet delinquent, since the 
last mailing of bills did not go 
out until Nov. 16. And some of 
the bills have not yet been 
mailed. 

"The Registry is way behind," 
said Foy, "but they're trying to 
catch up." 

The excise tax bills are due 60 
days from the mailing date. If 
they are not paid in that time, a 
second notice [a demand] goes 
out. 



If that doesn't get a rise out 
of recalcitrant taxpayers, the 
case is turned over to a deputy 
tax collector who can send out 
two notices of his own. 

After that the whole thing is 
turned over to the Registry. 

In the past, the Registry has 
confiscated the plates of 
delinquent taxpayers but that 
punishment didn't seem to have 
the proper effect. 

Now, the Registry is 
empowered to take away the 
delinquent's license -- and the 
Registry has been doing just 
that. 

In recent months, hundreds of 
them have been hauled before 
Hearings Officers and either lost 
their licenses or coughed up 
heavy fines, interest, costs and 
charges as well as the basic tax. 



Qulnn Heads Finance 

Kelly, Powers P W, 
Ordinance Chairmen 



Two of the most powerful 
committees in the Quincy City 
Council will be chaired by 
freshman councillors this year. 

City Council President Arthur 
H. Tobin announces that Leo J. 
Kelly of Ward 1 will head the 
Public Works Committee and 
Warren A. Powers of Ward 5 will 
lead the Ordinance Committee. 

Along with the Finance 
Committee, chaired by veteran 
Councillor-at-large John J. 
Quinn, they make up the 
Council's committees of the 
whole. 

Tobin said it was arranged 
that each of the nine councillors 
will be chairman of two 



committees and vice chairman of 
two others. Quinn will chair 
three of the 19 committees. 

Councillor-elect James A. 
Sheets of Ward 4, who has not 
yet taken the oath of office 
since his right to sit is in dispute, 
was named to the committees on 
a pro tern basis until his case is 
settled. 

Members of the committees 
[with the first named chairman 
and the second names vice 
chairman] are: 

STANDING COMMITTEES 
Finance: Quinn, Lydon, 
Harrington, Kelly, LaRaia, 
Marshall, Powers, Sheets, Tobin. 
[Cont'd on Page 3] 



Even Shovels Snow For Constituent 



Sheets Carries Out Duties, Defense Fund Readied 



By TOM HENSHAW 

A lady from West Quincy 
called her City Councillor 
after the snow storm last 
Thursday with a typical 
complaint. 

She had paid $4 to have 
her sidewalk shovelled and 
now the city's dad-dratted 
snow plow had come along 
and pushed all the snow back. 

Her councillor's reaction 
was not typical. 

Jim Sheets went over and 
shovelled the lady out 
himself. 

Even while Sheets was thus 
engaged, some of the best 
legal minds of Quincy and 
Boston were coming to grips 
with The Big Question: Is he 
or is he not the city 
councillor from Ward 4? 

The voters of Ward 4 think 
he is. They chose him by a 
3-2 margin over incumbent 
Albert R. Barilaro in the Dec. 
4 election. 



Atty. Frank W. Cormack 
and 10 mysterious tax payers 
think he's not. They claim he 
can't be a councillor while 
drawing a salary as head_ of 
the government department 
at Quincy Junior College. 

Sheets himself doesn't 
know. He declined to take 
the oath of office Jan. 7 lest 
it jeopardize his livelihood, 
his $16,000 salary from the 
Junior College. 

Council President Arthur 
H. Tobin doesn't know 
either. Nevertheless, he 
appointed Sheets to his share 
of Council committees - but 
as a non-voting, pro tern 
member. 

Under the law, the 
defeated Barilaro could 
reclaim his seat and serve on 
an interim basis until the 
matter is cleared up. But, said 
Tobin, Barilaro hasn't moved 
either way. 

In other developments on 



the Sheets front: 

• Ron Kaufman, his 
campaign manager, disclosed 
the formation of a "Friends 
of Jim Sheets Committee" to 
raise funds to pay legal fees 
that might be incurred if 
Sheets has to fight for his seat 
in court. 

[A rumor went around the 
city last Thursday [Jan. 10] 
that Cormack and his 
taxpayers were about to seek 
an injunction to prevent 
Sheets from taking his 
Council seat but nothing 
came of it.] 

• A group of young people 
who campaigned for Sheets 
announced they will hold a 
press conference tonight 
[Thursday] at 7 p.m. at their 
headquarters [the Sheets 
cellar at 926 Furnace Brook 
Parkway] to issue a 
statement on their plans. 

"The kids look upon this 
as the third phase in the 



election campaign," said 
Kaufman. "It's unfortunate. 
We only planned for two - 
the primary and the final 
election." 

Sheets himself said he 
expects that his attorney, 
Kevin Keating of Boston, will 
have completed researching 
the subject by today and will 
have some definite advice on 
whether or not he should 
take his seat. 

Meanwhile, said Sheets, 
"I've been doing all the work 
a councillor usually does in 
his ward. I've handled about 
25 or 30 of the routine calls 
that a councillor usually gets. 

"When the snow came 
Wednesday night, I spent a 
couple of hours in the cab of 
a snow plow and three hours 
in a Civil Defense car seeing 
that the bad areas in the ward 
were plowed. 

"I plan to attend Council 
meetings and, when this is 



over, I'll get out a news letter 
to let the people know how I 
would have voted on the 
issues that came before the 
Council." 



JAMES SHEETS 
Councillor - Almost 



Page 2 Quincy Sun Thursday, January 17, 1974 



STATEMENT OF CONDITION 

COLONIAL FEDERAL SAVINGS 
AND LOAN ASSOCIATION OF QUINCY 



ASSETS 



Quincy, Massachusetts 
Close of Business December 31, 1973 

LIABILITIES AND NET WORTH 



' 



Mortgage Loans and Other 

Liens on Real Estate $29,568,915.36 

All Other Loans 330,105.37 

Real Estate Owned and 

in Judgement 38,229.53 

Cash on Hand and In Banks 522,797.13 

Investments and Securities 4,365,689.93 

Fixed Assets Less 
Depreciation 323,756.67 

Deferred Charges and Other 1 16,086.00 

Assets 

TOTAL ASSETS $35,265,579.99 



Savings Accounts $32,338,782.59 

Advances From Federal 
Home Loan Bank 50,000.00 

Advance Payments by 

Borrowers for Taxes 240,754.21 

t 
Loans In Process 44,369.26 

Other Liabilities 72,068.62 

Income Deferred to 

Future Operations 202,540.84 

Specific. Reserves 76,831.65 

General Reserves 1,617,853.01 

Undivided Profits 622,379.81 

TOTAL LIABILITIES $35,265,579.99 



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Tuesday, Wed. A Sat till 5:30 





••k^"*-**** y«sk*«*" . ^'»*i'**»**~*« 



UP, UP, AND AWAY -- Looking like some streamlined rocket poised 
for flight, this 30-foot high, 3,500 pound sculpture in steel was 
created by students at Quincy Vocational-Technical School under 
the direction of the school system's artist-in-residence John 
Raimondi. Pictured with the sculpture from left are Richard Sheean, 
Steven McPheters, David Cooke, Donald Allan, Jay Gould, 
Raimondi, John Sullivan, Robert Trott, an instructor at the 
Vocational School, James Gould and Philip Anastasio. 

Voc-Tech Students Commended 
For 3,500-Lb. Sculpture 



Sculptor-in-residence John 
Raimondi, seven Quincy 
Vocational-Technicall School 
students and their teacher, have 
been commended for the work 
they performed in creating a 
3,500 pound work in steel as 
part of the school system's 
Artists-In-Schools program. 

The sculpture, entitled JAT 
[for James and Tracy] was 
created at the Vocational-Tech- 
nical School and delivered to the 
home of Dr. James L. Spates in 
Geneva, N.Y. 



In a letter to School Supt. Dr. 
Lawrence P. Creedon Dr. Spates 
praised the students for their 
"thorough dedication" and 
"skill remarkable in its 
professional quality given the 
age of the students." 

"For producing such a group 
of excellent students in your 
schools and such fine, dedicated 
teachers as Mr. Robert Trott, 
you, Principal Laurence Babin, 
and the entire Quincy School 
System, are to be highly 
complimented." 



BARKER'S 



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PAYROLL DOME BOOKS 

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For 12-Month Period 



Thursday, January 17, 1974 Quincy Sun Page 3 



Municipal Dept. Budget Requests Total $69 Million 



The cost of doing government 
in Quincy is going up in 1974 - 
but no one can say just how 
much. 

"We're not looking for too big 
an increase over last year," said 
Budget Director William R. 
Grindlay. 

Grindlay last week received 
budget requests from the various 
city departments totalling about 
$69 million for a 12-month 
period. 

A year ago, the requests 
added up to $94.9 million for an 
18-month period and by the 
time the Hannon Administration 
and the City Council got 
through hacking at it, the budget 
was down to $83.2 million. 

At that rate, color the 1974 
budget $61.7 million -- but don't 
bet on it. 

Figuring the 12-month share 
of last year's 18-month budget 



at $55.4 million that would 
mean a $6.3 million increase for 
1974 - but don't bet on that, 
either. 

Grindlay said the 1 974 budget 
"in its raw form" breaks down 
to $44 million in requests for 
general expenses and $25 million 
for the school department. 

"The big increase is in the 
hospital budget," said Grindlay, 
"but that will be at least partly 
offset by an increase in hospital 
receipts when the 6 per cent rate 
increase starts." 

Grindlay said Tuesday that 
the Administration has already 
considered the budget requests 
of the small departments and the 
Fire Department and is now 
working on the $14 million 
requested by the Hospital. 

By law, the budget must be 
submitted to the City Council 
for hearings by Feb. 28. 






5i* *> ' ** ■ 






-9 i#tr 



City Council Committee 
Chairmen Named By Tobin 




[Cont'd from Page 1] 

Public Works: Kelly, Marshall, 
Harrington, LaRaia, Lydon, 
Powers, Quinn, Sheets, Tobin. 
' Ordinance: Powers, LaRaia, 
Harrington, Kelly, Lydon, 
Marshall, Quinn, Sheets,- Tobin. 

Public Safety: Marshall, 
Powers, Harrington. Lydon. 

Public Health, Hospital and 
Welfare: LaRaia, Sheets, 
Harrington, Kelly, Quinn. 

Veterans Services: Lydon, 
Marshall, Kelly. 

Pensions: Sheets, Kelly, 
LaRaia, Marshall, Quinn. 

Public Parks and Recreation: 
Harrington, Powers, Kelly, 
Lydon, Quinn. 

Beautification, Library and 
Historical Places: Powers, 
Lydon, Harrington, Kelly. 

Land Conveyance: Quinn, 
Harrington, Kelly, Marshall, 
Powers. 

Rules: Marshall, Quinn, 
Harrington, Powers. 

SPECIAL COMMITTEES 

Oversight: Quinn, Harrington, 
LaRaia, Marshall, Powers. 

Disposal and Sanitary 
Problems: Sheets, Quinn, Kelly, 
Lydon, Marshall. 

Federal Funds: Kelly, Lydon, 
Marshall. 

Youth Committee: LaRaia, 
Sheets, Kelly, Lydon, Marshall. 

Environmental Control: 
Harrington, Kelly, Marshall, 
Quinn, Sheets. 

Drug Abuse: Lydon, Marshall, 
Kelly, Quinn, Sheets. 

Public Transportation: Sheets, 
LaRaia, Kelly, Marshall, Quinn. 

School Construction 
Maintenance: Harrington, 
Powers, Lydon, Quinn, Sheets. 

Tobin explained that he tried 
to appoint chairmen and vice 
chairmen to committees where 
their expertise would be the 
most effective. 

"I reappointed Councillor 
Quinn as chairman of the 
Finance Committee," he said, 
"because he had the most 
expertise in the subject and has 
done an excellent job in the 
past. 

"Councillor Kelly came to me 
and said he would like to work 
with the Public Works 
Committee because of the great 
amount of street work that has 
to be done on unaccepted streets 
in Adams Shore, Germantown 
and Houghs Neck. 

"Councillor Powers is an 
attorney-at-law and thus has the 
expertise to deal with the legal 
technicalities and problems that 
naturally come before the 
ordinance committee." 

Tobin explained that, until 
the Sheets matter is settled, the 
viee chairmen of his committees- 



will serve as chairmen and 
Councillor Quinn will replace 
him temporarily as vice 
chairman of the Public Health 
Committee. 



JOBS FOR QUINCY - George Reardon [right! , president of the South Shore Chamber of Commerce, 
and Thomas Komarek of the Manpower Division of the U.S. Labor Department, sign a $117,000 
contract to hire and train 41 disadvantaged local residents for skilled jobs. Looking on are Congressman 
James A. Burke [D-Milton] [left] and Winthrop Sargent IV, member of the Chamber's board of 
directors. 



YOU MAY GET 5 ROOMS OF 
CARPET FOR THE PRICE 

f%B ftill V M or even do b e"" with 

Wr Will I "t 4 rooms for the price of 3 




v *^*«; 




SPECIAL HOURS ONLY 

Monday thru Friday afternoons 12-5 Saturdays 9-3 



contract carpet center 




DIV. OF GENERAL 

MILLWORK& LUMBER 

258 

WILLARD ST. 
QUINCY 471-1260 



Page 4 Quincy Sun Thursday, January 17, 1974 

• Editorial 

His Own Man 

Quincy has five new city councillors-well, four and a half--and the 
eyes of many will be on them for the next two years. 

James Sheets, of course, has declined to take his oath until an 
alleged conflict matter has been brought to a head. But eventually he 
or someone else will occupy the Ward 4 seat. 

The five new councillors represent one of the biggest turnovers in 
that body in many years. If you like percentages, it is 55 per cent, in 
new faces. 

Speaking for ourselves and for the many voters who have placed 
their faith in them, we would like to address an observation to 
freshman Councillors Leo J. Kelly, John J. Lydon, Warren A. 
Powers, Dennis E. Harrington and Mr. Sheets. 

And that is, we hope each of you is going to be his own man. 
There has been some criticism that recent councils sometimes 
looked like a "rubber stamp council". That there were too many 9-0 
or 8-1 votes. Maybe the criticism is just and maybe it is not. 

But we do hope that the new council members at least will stand 
up once in awhile and ask a question or two when Mayor Walter 
Hannon sends in an appropriation order or wants to make a new 
appointment. And we hope they will speak out on resolves and 
ordinance matters. 

Our city government has both an executive branch and a 
legislative branch. The mayor should not become the 10th member 
of the City Council nor should city councillors become assistant 
mayors. 

The executive and legislative branches should remain separate and 
be a check on each other. Quincy will be a better city for it. 

But we don't want to see councillors popping up in the council 
chamber every Monday night headline hunting. Constructive 
criticism is healthy. But to take pot shots at the mayor for personal 
political gain is a big step backward for Quincy. 

There is no reason in the world that Mayor Hannon and the City 
Council cannot work together in the best interests of Quincy and its 
people. 

The mayor has shown in the past two years that he pretty much 
does his own thinking. We hope that each of the nine members of 
the council-both newcomer and veteran-will do his own thinking, 
too. 

But they can agree-or disagree-and still row together to move 
Quincy ahead. 

A few 54 votes on the council floor, might even help more than 
hinder. 



Historic Moments 



REDS ON TRIAL 

On Jan. 17, 1949, 11 top- 
ranking U.S. Communists 
went on trial for plotting to 
overthrow the federal govern- 
ment. 

FRANKLIN BORN 

Benjamin Franklin was 
born in Boston on Jan. 17, 
1706. 

KIPLING DIES 
Poet Rudyard Kipling died 
at age 70 on Jan. 18, 1936. 



CORONA GL1LTY 

On Jan. 18, 1973, Juan V. 
Corona was found guilty of 
killing 25 itinerant farm work- 
ers in Yuba City, Calif. 



ROBERT E. LEE 

Confederate Gen. Robert E. 
Lee was born at Stratford, 
Va., on Jan. 19, 1807. 



SECOND TERM 

Richard M. Nixon was inau- 
gurated for his second term as 
president on Jan. 20, 1973. 

PEARL HARBOR 

On Jan. 20, 1886, the Senate 
approved the leasing of Pearl 
Harbor as a base for the U.S. 
Navy. 

NAUTILUS 
LAUNCHED 

The Nautilus, first atomic- 
powered submarine, was 
launched at Groton, Conn., on 
Jan. 21, 1954. 





Jack Anderson 

Pulitzer Prize Winner for National Reporting, and 
Syndicated Columnist for The Quincy Sun. 

• Bonanza For Oil Barons 

# Arab-Israeli Talks Delicate 
m Nervous IRS Re-audits Nixon 



(Copyright, 1*73, by United Feature Syndicate, Inc.) 



"When Nixon promised to 'bring us together', I didn't know he 
meant car pools!" 



WASHINGTON - The 
federal energy office has an- 
nounced an investigation 
into oil profits. 

Rather than wait for the 
results, we have conducted 
our own investigation. We 
have talked to sources inside 
the big oil companies and 
managed to obtain corporate 
papers which were never in- 
tended to be read outside the 
executive suites. Here are 
our findings: 

The oil companies 
definitely have squeezed 
higher profits for themselves 
from the oil shortage. For ex- 
ample, the Persian Gulf 
countries have increased 
their oil income by doubling 
the taxes and royalties from 
three dollars to seven dollars 
a barrel. 

The oil compa n ies, 
however, are permitted to 
charge off these payments, 
dollar for dollar, against 
their U.S. taxes. Then the 
companies add the foreign 
tax to the price of the oil. In 
other words, the consumers 
really pay the overseas tax 
increase, but the companies 
take credit for it on their 
U. S. returns. 

The oil companies have 
also used the shortage as an 
excuse to cut back some of 
the products that aren't too 
profitable. The oil industry 
produces around 3,000 pro- 
ducts, some of them vital to 
other industries. Now oil 
companies are channeling 
the available oil into the pro- 
ducts that make the most 
money for themselves. 

The majors are also closing 
their less profitable gas sta- 
tions and putting the squeeze 
on independently-owned sta- 
tions. This means the oil shor- 
tage will wind up increasing 
the profits that the big com- 
panies get from their retail 
outlets. 

So far, the oil shortage has 
been a bonanza for most com- 
panies. Only their customers 
are hurting. 

Delicate Stage: The Arab- 
Israeli talks have now reach- 
ed a crucial juncture. The 
Israelis have offered to pull 
back about 18 miles from the 
Suez Canal into the Sinai 
mountain passes. In return, 
they want the canal reopened 
and the towns along its banks 
resettled. This would be in- 
surance, the Israelis feel, 
against a renewed Egyptian 
attack. 

Spirit lifter 
for the week 

By RUTH STAFFORD 
PEALE 

Fear is a profligate waste of 
energy, for statistics prove 
that most fears never materi- 
alize. 

Fear thrives in dark 
thoughts. The best antidote to 
fear is to think about God. 
This floods your life with light 
and fears scurry away. God is 
the great and sustaining light 
of the world. He gives confi- 
dence and strength. 

". . . the Lord is the strength 
of my life; of whom shall I be 
afraid?" Psalm 27:1 



The Egyptians, however, 
have refused any "partial set- 
tlement." They will accept 
the Israeli offer only if it is 
tied to a timetable for total 
Israeli withdrawal from 
Egyptian lands. The Egyp- 
tians want to go back to the 
border that existed before the 
1967 war. 

Israeli Defense Minister 
Moshe Dayan flew to Wash- 
ington to win U. S. support. 
Egyptian Foreign Minister 
Ismail Fahmy flew to Moscow 
to win Soviet support. 

But in the strictest secrecy, 
Fahmy has informed Secre- 
tary of State Henry Kissinger 
that the Egyptians would 
rather not work too closely 
with their Soviet allies. 

The Soviets, for example, 
wanted a seat on the military 
working group which is try- 
ing to separate the Egyptian 
and Israeli forces on the 
Suez-Sinai front. Fahmy con- 
fided to Kissinger that Egypt 
didn't want the Soviets on the 
working group. 

It will take delicate 
diplomacy, meanwhile, to 
achieve a settlement. But 
Kissinger privately is op- 
timistic. 

Crack in Latin Left: The 

overthrow of Salvador 
Allende's Marxist regime in 
Chile has thrown the leftist 
movement throughout Latin 
America into a tizzy. 

Secret intelligence reports 
quote Cuba's Fidel Castro as 
calling Allende a weakling 
and blaming his timid 
leadership for the downfall 
of Marxism in Chile. 
Allende's failure, Castro has 
said, only confirms his own 
convictions that a Marxist 
revolution is impossible 
without mass mobilization 
and a complete crack-down 
on the opposition. 

But other Latin American 
leftists, according to the in- 
telligence reports, have bit- 
terly blamed Castro for let- 
ting down the Allende 
regime. They have complain- 
ed that the Soviet Union also 
backed off when Allende 
needed support. 

Increasingly, the leftist 
movement in Latin America 
is sharply split between the 
regular Communists who 
follow the Moscow line and 
the splinter groups. These 
range from extremists and 
terrorists to moderate 
socialists. 



The anti-Soviet leftists 
look upon Castro as a 
Kremlin lackey. They 
believe Cuba has fallen 
under the influence of 
Moscow until it no longer 
supports revolutionary 
movements for the sake of 
reform but merely carries 
out Soviet policy in Latin 
America. 

Watergate Whirlpool: 

Some of our most respected 
government agencies have 
been caught in the Watergate 
whirlpool. The Central In- 
telligence Agency became a 
cover for laundrying cam- 
paign cash in Mexico. The 
former FBI director 
destroyed incriminating 
evidence in his fireplace. The 
Secret Service has been ac- 
cused of ordering millions of 
dollars worth of improve- 
ments on President Nixon's 
private homes. 

But the agency which has 
been hurt the most — and the 
one that can least afford it - 
is the Internal Revenue Ser- 
vice. The American people 
pay their taxes on the honor 
system. We suffer in silence 
on the assumption everyone 
else is doing the same. 

Over the past year, 
however, we have learned 
that the President got away 
with paying less taxes than 
the average working family. 
Anyone else who had vir- 
tually wiped out his taxes 
with huge deductions would 
have been subjected to a 
thorough audit. Yet all Nixon 
received was a whitewash. 

Now the President has in- 
vited a joint congressional 
committee to review his 
taxes. Our sources inside the 
IRS say this made the agency 
nervous. Fearing congres- 
sional sleuths might find 
something its own agents had 
missed, the IRS hastily or- 
dered a reaudit of the Presi- 
dent's tax returns. 

Our sources say the agents 
are taking a particularly 
close look at the financing of 
Nixon's San Clemente estate. 
The President bought the 
estate with money loaned to 
him by his millionaire friend, 
Robert Abplanalp,' who can- 
celed the debt in return for a 
deed to a part of the property. 
Yet the President wound up 
with the most valuabe section 
and he has been using 
Abplanalp's portion rent-free. 
Our sources confide that 
the President is almost sure 
to have to pay some back 
taxes. 




Published weekly on Thursday by 

The Quincy Sun Publishing Company 

1601 Hancock St., Quincy, Massachusetts 02169 

Publisher and Editor 

Henry W. Bosworth, Jr. 

Advertising Director 

John B. Powers 

10</ Per Copy - $3.50 Per Year - Out of State $4.50 Per Year 

Telephone: 471-3100 471-3101 4713102 

Second-Class Postage Paid at Boston, Mass. 

MEMBER NEW ENGLAND PRESS ASSOCIATION 

tvnIJ!!nK QUi , nCy SU " a " umei no financiaI rejponiibility for 
n aSl err °" ln ■**"*"«!. but will reprint that part of 
an advert.sement in which the typographical error occur,. 



J 



Thursday, January 17, 1974 Quincy Sun Page 5 



Sunbeams 



By HENRY BOSWORTH 

Senator Edward Kennedy would be quite surprised if President 
Nixon suddenly upped and resigned. 

During his visit to The Quincy Sun office last week, reporter Tom 
Henshaw, in an interview, asked: 

"There's been talk around that the President will be out of office 
by April. Do you hear anything like that down in Washington? 

"No," replied Kennedy. "I'm not probably on the inside track as 
far as the White House goes. There are some people in Washington 
that hope so [Nixon resign] ... perhaps other people around the 
country would hope so. But I would believe that he would wait for 
the results of the House Judiciary Committee" [impeachment 
investigation.] 

DON'T LOOK FOR any shakeup in Mayor Walter Hannon's 
official family. All department heads are expected to stay. Might be 
a new face or two on municipal boards. 

GOV. SARGENT • definitely would have carried Fenno House, 
Wollaston, by a landslide last week. He made quite a hit with 200 or 
so of the residents as he signed the agreements there to clear way for 
construction of the new Clay St. senior citizens housing project. 

While addressing the residents, he playfully noted that a tape 
recorder was spinning in front of him. "It's nice," he noted, "to be 
able to see the tape recorder and not wonder [peeking under the 
table] where the mike is." [Nixon wouldn't have appreciated it.] 

After the signing, the Governor presented the pen to Rev. Frank 
Bauer, direetor of Fenno House, to give to Mrs. Bauer as a souvenir. 

The residents-who have as much enthusiasm as teenagers-gave the 
Governor a big hand then and when he cited Fenno House as a fine 
example of a senior citizens residence. 

Later, Rev. Bauer, who supervises Fenno House, was 
complimented on the facility and the "young" enthusiasm of the 
senior citizens. "They keep me hopping," he smiled. 

EARLIER at a luncheon at the Wollaston Golf Club, Sargent, 
predicting that the Clay St. facility will be one of the best, quipped: 
"I wanted to be an architect before I went bad." 

SUDDEN THOUGHT: Wonder if Quincy has ever had three top 
officials visiting the city separately within the same week? In order 
of appearance: Atty. Gen. Robert Quinn, Senator Edward Kennedy 
and Gov. Sargent. 

APPOINTMENT OF Ward 6 Councillor Dennis Harrington as 
vice-chairman of the Oversight Committee and Ward 5 Councillor 
Warren Powers as a member, indirectly gives Norfolk County Dist. 
Atty. George Burke an inside seat at the investigation of the 
cemetery department. Both are assistant district attorneys. 

LEO KELLY, new Ward 1 Councillor, turned up at the inaugural 
ball with a green carnation in his lapel. Dress carnation for all others 
was white. 

DOC STORK is about to flap his wings over the home of Rep. 
Thomas Brownell. He and wife, Margaret, are expecting a new little 
constituent any day now. They have a daughter, Karen, 2. 

AT THE WOLLASTON Golf Club luncheon prior to the Clay St. 
agreement signing by Gov. Sargent, George Reardon. president 
South Shore Chamber of Commerce added this historic footnote: 

In 1895, the fairway actually had a white line down it. Golfers 
couldn't play over the line because that was Milton. 

WELL, here's a brain teaser for you from the Quincy Rotary 
Club newsletter: 

Write down the number of times you would like to have steak for 
dinner in any one week period. Multiply that figure by two. To that 
total add five. Multiply that total by 50. Add to that total 1723. 
Now subtract from that figure your year of birth. If you have done 
the problem correctly, the last two figures in your total will be your 
age. 

[You notice, of course, that in this day of high prices it's the 
number times you'd like to eat steak, not how many times you do 
eat it.] 




A Rector's Reflections 

30 Years Bring Changes, 
New Problems. Fond Memories 



By REV. CHESTER A. PORTEUS 
Rector Emeritus, Christ Church 

I have been asked by my 
long-time friend, the editor of 
the Quincy Sun, Henry 
Bosworth, Jr., to write down a 
few of my reflections on this 
community as I leave it after 
nearly 30 years of residence 
therein as the Rector of Christ 
Church. 

In fact, the editor suggested 
that I might put it in the weekly 
"Sermonette" form of the Christ 
Church Calendar which I have 
been writing for the same long 
period of time. 

Now here is a brave and 
unusual editor! I have dealt with 
many newspaper people long 
before my Quincy rectorate and 
they are generally very cautious 
about space for church news or 
opinions. The Parson is 
frequently supposed to live in a 
world so far removed from the 
actual world of every day, but I 
have not been able so to do at 
17 Elm St., and my long and 
continuing association with the 
Quincy Fire Department as 
Chaplain has kept me fairly well 
acquainted with the world as it 
is, and not unfrequently in the 
midst of human tragedy. 

Think a bit. What profession 
touches more of human life in 
its vJeal and woe - a baptism, a 
marriage, a funeral have more 
than once taken place in the 
same day! The parish clergyman 
may in fact be the last of the 
"general practioners" in the 
professions which have often 
become so specialized - and 
some of the ministry is no 
exception. 

South Quincy is no longer 
where most of Christ Church 
resides. Note the effect of the 
expansion of business and traffic 
up Quincy Avenue. There are 




REV. CHESTER A. PORTEUS 

not the vacant lots that were to 
be found 30 years ago. 
Apartment houses are coming in 
to that area. In the many 
marriages at Christ Church in the 
last 25 years, few of the young 
Quincy couples have remained in 
the city for their first residence 
due to availability of suitable 
quarters within their financial 
means. 

Many of our business people 
are not now Quincy residents as 
the rosters of civic organizations 
will attest this situation as well 
as our churches. We do well to 
ponder a bit about the future as 
to the residential characteristic 
of Quincy that some of us have 
known and enjoyed in the past. 

"Judge by the whole record" 
is ever sound advice, and such 
applies as well to newspaper 
editorials as to the pulpit. We 
must have acquired a deep spot 
in our hearts for the City of 
Presidents - and when we 1 did 
move, we did not move far 
away, but out of the parish 
which is generally considered 
wise for people in my 
profession, although the original 



name of the parish was Christ's 
Church, Braintree, New England, 
established in 1704 - the oldest 
Episcopal parish in the Diocese, 
before the town of Quincy and 
the City of Quincy. 

My long-time friend and 
brother historian, the late 
William Churchill Edwards, 
often explained carefully to me 
the history of relationship 
between The First Parish Church 
and Christ's Church - the second 
Church. Neither do I forget a 
visit of the late Cardinal Cushing 
to St. Mary's Roman Catholic 
Church - the first in this area - 
with the late Dr. Gale and 
myself as special guests of 
Father John McMahon. 

Ah, Mr. Editor, you have not 
enough space for all this, but 
you can sense that I am most 
grateful for the long privilege of 
the Rectorship and for the many 
friendships in the parish and the 
community. 

I shall miss the almost daily 
visits with Officer Morgan 
O'Reagan as he patrols this area 
for law and order - one of 
Quincy's "finest" in my book, 
and this Fire Chaplain has been 
glad to serve the Police 
Department in many annual 
functions and Memorial Services. 
Every city has its present 
problems, but please remember 
that the superb courage and 
relentless determination of men 
and women were part of its early 
history, and that some of the 
early leaders of this nation were 
from this very place - the City of 
Presidents. 

On the whole record, Quincy 
has much of good to offer those 
who shall serve, in our places. 
Take the best lessons of the past 
into the new future. Such will 
continue to serve them well, 
however inevitable the changing 
scene. 



You Can Call IRS For Tax Info Help 



Massachusetts taxpayers can 
get quick answers to their tax 
problems by calling the Internal 
Revenue Service from anywhere 
in the state without having to 
pay long distance charges, 
announces William E. Williams, 
District Director of Internal 
Revenue Service for 
Massachusetts. 

•Letter Box 



Boston area residents can 
contact the IRS by calling 
locally, 223-3431. 

The new phone service is 
available on a year-round basis 
to help taxpayers in all their 
dealings with the IRS. ' 

Although help is as near as a 
telephone with the new system, 



Williams said most taxpayers 
should be able to prepare their 
own returns by following the 
step-by-step instructions that 
come with their Form 1040 or 

1040A. If taxpayers need 
additional help, they can call the 
IRS via the toll-free telephone 
service. 



A 'Thank You 9 From Postmaster Walker 



Editor, Quincy Suri: 

The United States Postal 
Service Christmas operation for 
1973 was the best we have ever 
experienced. 

1 would like to express my 
sincere appreciation to the news 
media for their cooperation in 
conveying our messages to mail 
early, use Zip Code and to band 
Christmas cards in local and out 
of state bundles. 

Due to the energy crisis and 
the cancellation of air flights 
carrying mail, it was imperative 
that our customers mail as early 
as possible. The public response 
to our news releases was 
extraordinary to the point that 
over 50% of the Christmas mail 
was received and processed by 
December 15th. 

We in the Postal Service are 



well aware of the public service 
contribution continually being 
made by the news media and are 
most grateful for your 
cooperation. 

On behalf of all the 



employees of the Boston Postal 
District, I am extending our very 
best wishes for a Happy and 
Healthy New Year to all. 

George K. Walker 
Postmaster 



"And cut out the starches. 




•Youth Speaks Out 

• Quincy High now has two sessions of "Night School" - one at 7 
p.m. and one at 8 a.m. 

• When little kids are sent to school, they should be well equipped - 
black jacks, switch blades and mace in case they get jumped in the 
dark. Soon they will be fit to enter national politics. 

• It's interesting that the School Committee meeting of Jan. 9 was 
cancelled because of a snow storm, but school was in session on Jan. 
9 and Jan. 10. 

• If bread does go up to $1 a loaf its name should be changed from 
the staff of life to the shaft of life. 

• Super Sunday is over, and one point sticks in my mind after 
viewing the game which originated from Houston, Texas. Are people 
from Texas born with cowboy hats on? 

• President Nixon's favorite desert? Impeach Melba of course! 

Quincy High School Journalism Class. 



Page 6 Quincy Sun Thursday, January 17, 1974 

Quincy Catholic Club 
Snowflake Ball Jan. 26 



The Quincy Catholic Club will 
hold its Snowflake Ball Jan. 26 
at the Lantana, Randolph. 

Cocktails will be at 7 p.m. 
followed by dinner at 8 p.m. and 
dancing until midnight to the 
music of Earl Hannafin's 
orchestra. 

Mrs. John J. Hanratty is 
chairman of the dance, which 
will benefit the club's 
scholarship fund. 

Invited guests will be Rev. 
John Tierney, pastor of St. 
John's Church; Mr. and Mrs. 
Anthony Aimola, president of 
St. John's Junior League; Mr. 
and Mrs. Alfred Allsopp, prefect 
of St. John's Sodality; Mr. and 
Mrs. James Buttomer, president 
of St. John's Womens Club; and 
Mrs. James F. Fostello, president 
of St. John's Holy Name 
Society. 



Mrs. Anthony Constantina 
and Mrs. Erick Lindewall are on 
the ticket committee and Mrs. 
William Boethel and Mrs. 
William Jolicoeur are in charge 
of prizes. 

Members of the committee 
include: 

Mrs. Everett Bracchi, Mrs. 
Jack Buonopane, Mrs. Francis 
Daly, Mrs. William Donnelly, 
Mrs. James Duggan, Mrs. Robert 
Foley, Mrs. Peter Gacicia, Mrs. 
Ettone Grilli, Mrs. Sidney Hajjar, 
Mrs. Thomas Kenney, Mrs. Peter 
Killelea, Mrs. Francis Lamb. 

Also Mrs. Frank Lomano, 
Mrs. Theophilus McLelland, Mrs. 
George Molla, Mrs. Thomas 
Morrissey, Mrs. Paul Ricca, Mrs. 
John Rooney, Miss Virginia 
Ross, Mrs. Alfred Saluti, Mrs. 
Daniel Shea and Mrs. Richard 
Sweeney. 



Legal Secretaries 
To View Mock Trial 



The January meeting of the 
Norfolk County Legal 
Secretaries Association will be 
held in a room at Quincy 
District Court, Chestnut St., 
Quincy, on Monday, Jan. 21, at 
7:30 p.m. 

Following the meeting will be 
a Mock Trial at 8 p.m. with 
Court Clerk Dennis F. Ryan, 
acting as Judge and Atty. 
Richard W. Barry and Atty. Paul 
A. M. Hunt prosecuting and 
defending. Light refreshments 
will be served after the program. 
Anyone may join the Norfolk 
County Legal Secretaries 
Association who is licensed to 
practice law or engaged as 



secretary, stenographer, typist or 
clerk in any law office; and 
persons employed by the courts, 
the trust department of banks or 
trust companies, or in any public 
or private institution directly 
engaged in work of a legal 
nature, including all public 
offices of the United States 
Government, states, cities, 
counties or municipalities. 

Prospective members 
interested in attending the Mock 
Trial may contact Miss Corinne 
Chase at 828-3111. Anyone 
wishing more information on 
membership may contact the 
membership chairman, Mrs. 
Jeanne Pittman, at 769-2606. 




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Roberta Ferguson To Be 
Installed By Wollaston Rainbow 



Roberta A. Ferguson, 17, 
daughter of Mr. and Mrs. John 
C. Ferguson of 41 Graham St., 
will be installed as Worthy 
Advisor of the Wollaston 
Assembly of the Order of the 
Rainbow for Girls, Saturday at 8 
p.m. at Quincy Masonic Temple, 
Hancock St., Quincy Center. 

She is a senior at Quincy High 
School. 

Other officers to be installed 
are: 

Gayle Wardrop, Worthy 
Associate Advisor; Gail Gorachy,' 
Charity; Phyllis Morse, Hope; 
Cynthia Gunnison, Faith. 
Catherine Rowell, Recorder; 
Cheryl Ferguson, Treasurer; 
Pamela West, Chaplain and 
Linda Walker, Drill Leader. 

Also, Karen Jennette, Love; 
Cheryl Shaw, Religion; Linda 
Younie, Nature; Joyce Abbott, 



Marriage 
Intentions 



Anthony R. D'AUessandro, 20 
Washburn St., East Weymouth, 
machine operator; Diane J. 
Cormack, 45 Oval Rd, Quincy, 
secretary. 

Donald K. Farrar, 80 Cocasset 
St., Foxboro, lineman; Barbara 
A. MacDonald, 49 Pleasant St., 
Quincy, clerk. # 

Dennis R. Mackin, 69 
Glendale Rd, Quincy, supervisor; 
Christine M. Ross, 428 Hyde 
Park Ave., Roslindale, research 
clerk. 



PERMANENT 
REMOVAL 



UNWANTED 



jji 



MARLENE 
MELAMED RE. 

Registered and Licensed 
Electrologist 
1151 Hancock St. 
Quincy 

By Appointment only 

Call 773-1330 

FORMERLY 

FREDERICKS. HILL 




Patriotism; Vicki 
Confidential Observer; 
Walsh, Outer Observer; 
Widman, Musician; 
Haines, Choir Director. 



Foye, 

Karen 

Ruth 

Debra 



ROBERTA FERGUSON 

Service; Darlene Bocash, 
Immortality; Jean Palmer, 
Fidelity; Jayne Collins, 



Dorothy Woodward, 
American Flag; Marlene Benson, 
State Flag; Nancy Younie,' 
Christian Flag; Gail Whitehead^ 
Grand Christian Flag; Linda Lee' 
Rainbow Flag; Bonnie Sullivan^ 
Assembly Banner; Jacklyn 
Dewar, Page East Green; Carolyn 
Turner, Page East Blue; Karen 
Bishop, Page West; Cynthia 
Allen, Assembly Greeter. 

Choir members include: 
Marilyn Benson, Ramona 
Boddie, Kathleen Callahan, 
Cheryl Colon, Nancy Coste| 
Susan Heliotis, Stacy Katz,' 
Robin Menz, Deborah Widman 
and Lynda Wilkins. 



Safari, Eclipse Lecture 
For St. James Ladies 



A slide lecture on an African 
lunar eclipse and safari will be 
featured at a meeting of the 
South Shore Ladies of St. James, 
Jan. 21 at 8 p.m. at the 
Montclair Men's Club, Holbrook 
Rd. 

The presentation will be by 
Richard Cutler, amateur 
astrologer and photographer 



who photographed both events 
in Africa last year. 

Mrs. Robert Tweedy and Mrs. 
James F. McCormick, Sr., are 
co-chairmen. The committee 
includes Mrs. George Kerressey, 
Mrs. Joseph O'Connor, Mrs. 
Steven McDonald, Mrs. Daniel 
McCull and Mrs. Mae Kelly. 



McCauley To Address 
Women's Republican Club 



Francis X. McCauley, 
chairman of the Quincy Housing 
Authority, will be guest speaker 
at a meeting of the Women's 
Republican Club of Quincy, 
Friday. 

The meeting will be held at 
Wollaston Methodist Church. A 
coffee hour will start at 1 p.m 



Central Junior High School 
students will present a musical 
program directed by Mrs. 
Catherine Carnabuci. 

Mrs. Lawrence W. Baker, 
president, will preside at the 
meeting. Hostesses will be Mrs. 
John Allen and Mrs. Uno Wall of 
Ward 4. 



r wm start at 1 p.m. waru 4. 

Rev., Mrs. Bertil Hult 
To Be Honored Sunday 

Salem Lutheran Church pas tor of Salem L 



The Salem 
Council will hold an open 
the church for 



pastor of Salem Lutheran 
Church after 20 years of service, 
reception at the church for H e and his family will be moving 
Pastor and Mrs. Bertel E. Hult to Wollaston early this year. 
Sunday Jan. 20 at 3 p.m. H is successor has not yet been 

Pastor Hult has retired as selected. 

Mrs. Mary Lewis Honored 
On Her 70th Birthday 

Mary F. Lewis. 47 children Wilhnr F t 



Mrs. Mary F. Lewis, 47 
Waterston Ave., Wollaston 
celebrated her 70th birthday at a 
dinner party given recently at 
Walsh's Restaurant. 

Mrs. Lewis has five children 
and 25 grandchildren and is a 
member of St. Ann's Senior 
Citizens Club and St. Ann's 
Marianns. 

The party was given by her 




children Wilbur Lewis, Paul 
Lewis, Mrs. Patrick Nevins and 
Mrs. Peter Golden of Quincy, 
and Mi. Robert Lewis of 
Braintree. 

Mrs. Lewis was also presented 
a framed resolve by Senator 
Arthur Tobin of Quincy, in 
behalf of the Senate, "in 
recognition" of her 70th 
birthday. 




PHOTO COURTESY OF THOMAS CRANE PUBLIC LIBRARY 



...the corner of Hancock St. 
and Granite St. had a block of 
retail stores where the Delia 
Chiesa parking lot is now. 

This photo was taken in 1919 



Do you remember when your 

last property valuation took 

place? Do you know who your 

Jj insurance company is? Talk 

Iff with us at Burgin-Platner. 

BURGIN 

PLATNER 

INS. 

1357 Hancock Street, 
Quincy 472-3000 



Thursday, January 17, 1974 Quincy Sun Page 7 




ENGAGED -- Mr. and Mrs. Edwin Amoroso of 25 James St., Quincy, 
announce the engagement of their daughter, Rita Louise Amoroso, 
to James Francis Rice, son of Mr. and Mrs. Thomas Rice of 50 
Presidents Lane, Quincy. The bride-to-be is a graduate of Quincy 
High School and is employed as a secretary for Investors' Mortgage 
Insurance Co., Boston. Mr. Rice is a graduate of Quincy High School 
and attends Suffolk University. A June 8 wedding is planned. 

[Sharon's Studio] 

Altrusa Club Announces 
Season Meeting Schedule 



The first meeting of the 
Altrusa Club of Quincy for 1974 
was held at the home of Miss 
Dorothy Newton and a program 
schedule was approved 
announces Mrs. Marie McCawm, 
president. 

Guest speaker at the Jan. 15 
dinner meeting was Atty. Diane 
Wixted Hayes, who discussed 
"Women in the Legal 
Professions". 

The meetings will be at the 
Neighborhood Club of Quincy. 

The Feb. 19 dinner meeting 
will feature an illustrated talk on 
Europe by Dr. Karim Khudari, 
Professor of Biology at Boston 
University. 

Topic of the March meeting 
will be announced later. 

Frank Culkin of Social 
Security will talk on Social 
Security and its new regulations 
at the April 16 dinner meeting. 

Sandra Cohen of the 
Massachusetts Institute of 
Technology will be guest speaker 



at the May 21 dinner meeting. 

Installation of officers and 
new directors will be held at the 
June 18 dinner meeting. It will 
be the final meeting until 
September. 

Altrusa is a Women's Service 
tlub composed of- women 
executives and in the 
professions. In addition to 
volunteer work members assist 
financially where needed. 
Among their projects is the 
South Shore Day Care Center, 
camperships for under-privileged 
children, awards to high school 
students for outstanding 
volunteer work and scholarships. 
Members are Foster Parents to a 
little girl in Peru. They also 
contribute to the International 
Altrusa Founder's Fund which 
aids women returning to the 
business world and grants-in-aid 
for assistance to foreign students 
completing their education in 
this country and in need of 
funds. 




DERRINGER 

THE FLORIST 
Plants Arrangements b'lttwers 

Jtf Hancock St. 7/1 0959 



At Quincy City Hospital 

January 5 

Mr. and Mrs. Thomas E. 
Chambers, 362 Center St., a 
daughter. 

January 6 

Mr. and Mrs. George F. 
McMahon, 121 Butler Road, a 
daughter. 

Mr. and Mrs. Howard S. 
Cutler, 176 Whitwell St., a 
daughter. 

Mr. and Mrs. James P. 
McLarnon, 78 Whiton Ave., a 
son. 

January 8 

Mr. and Mrs. James J. 
Buckley, 72 South Walnut St., a 
son. 

Mr. and Mrs. Philip Kelly, 112 
Elm Ave., a daughter. 

January 10 

Mr. and Mrs. Salvatore 
Spataro, 145 South Walnut St., a 
son. 

Mr. and Mrs. Stephen 
Wessling, 14 Richard St., a 
daughter. 

At South Shore Hospital 

January 4 

Mr. and Mrs. Jeffrey C. Leary, 
192A Whitwell St., a daughter. 

January 6 

Mr. and Mrs. Jeffrey Leary, 
192 Whitwell St., a daughter. 

January 10 

Mr. and Mrs. Paul R. 
D'Eramo, 316 Highland Ave., a 
son. 

Emblem Club 
Plans Social 

Meeting 

The Quincy Emblem Club will 
hold a social meeting Jan. 23 in 
the downstairs hall of the Elks 
Home. 

Gertrude Keating will be 
hostess and Rose Crowley is in 
charge of entertainment. 

Members of the committee 
are Past Presidents Dorothy 
Mateik and Margaret Denly, and 
Lucy Flaherty, Marie Wilkie and 
Sheila McDonald. 

The Emblem Club is preparing 
for its 50th anniversary in May. 






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ENGAGED - A Nov. 30, wedding is being planned by Miss Ann 
Marie Sadlier and Edward Joseph O'Leary. Their engagement is 
announced by her parents, Mr. and Mrs. Arthur F. Sadlier of Quincy. 
Mr. O'Leary is the son of Mr. and Mrs. James O'Leary of Quincy. 
Miss Sadlier, a graduate of Quincy High School, is employed by 
Boston Gear Works, Quincy. Mr. O'Leary, graduated from Sacred 
Heart High School in Weymouth and is a junior at Northeastern 
University where he majors in mechanical engineering. 

[Hobbs Studio] 

S.S. Simmons Club 
Takes 'Tour' Of Russia 



Members of the South Shore 
Simmons Club took a tour of 
Russia and other European 
countries via the pictures ana 
commentary of Professor and 
Mrs. Walter Wrigley of Quincy 
Wednesday at St. Chrysostom's 
Church. 

Mrs. Wrigley, who is president 
of the South Shore Simmons 
Club, accompanied her husband, 
professor of Aeronautical 
Engineering at Massachusetts 
Institute of Technology, on a six 
week tour of Europe. It began in 
Baku where Professor Wrigley 



was chairman of a Science 
Conference. After the 
conference, the Wrigleys 
travelled extensively through 
Russia and Europe. 

A covered dish supper was 
served. 

The Wrigleys are active 
members of First Parish 
Unitarian Church. 

Assisting Mrs. Otis B. Oakman 
of Braintree, Program Chairman, 
in the arrangements for the 
evening was Mrs. Richard 
Gordon of Milton, Hospitality 
chairman. 



Michael McNally Alumni Sodality Director 



E. Michael McNally of 18 
Brae Rd., Quincy attended the 
January meeting of the Catholic 
Alumni Sodality Sunday at the 



old Boston College High School, 
James St., Boston. 

He is a member of the Board 
of Directors of the Sodality. 



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Page 8 Quincy Sun Thursday, January 17, 1974 

YOUR HANDWRITING TELLS 

Forward slant 
'see-through' 

personality 



By DOROTHY 

ST. JOHN JACKSON 

Certified Master 

Graphoanalyst 
Copley News Service 

Dear Dorothy: 

I'm 33, have a nice husband 
and two beautiful children 
who seem to love me very 
much. But, sometimes, I won- 
der if I am losing my mind. I 
am always yelling and holler- 
ing at them and in a bad 
mood. The way things are go- 
ing, I will make a mess out of 
all my family and myself. No 
one likes me and I have no 
friends. Please help! 

L.O. 

Dear L.O.: 

Shame on you! You're put- 
ting on an act! 

You crave all the "spot- 
light" you feel you've missed 
during your young life, seen in 
the upswing endings ... and 
you're trying your best to at- 
tract as much attention your 
way as you can, seen in the 
circle i dots. Your desire to be 
noticed just leaps from your 
writing. What you expect 
from your husband would 
cause even the "nicest" to 
falter and fumble. 

You have a "see-through" 
personality, seen in your for- 
ward slant. Your pretenses 



are so transparent that you're 
really not fooling anyone who 
has any perception. 

People would like you, if 
you'd give them a chance. 
You are the one restricting 
friends, seen in the squared 
off g and y loops. You can't 
seem to forgive the past for 
neglecting you, seen in the 
rigid beginning upstrokes. 
The grudge you carry inflicts 
itself upon your husband and 
children, through your words 
and actions. 

You like to talk, seen in the 
open tops on a and o. And, 
with your intense desire for 
attention, your talk becomes a 
yell. 

The past is gone now and 

you've a lot of life ahead. 
Take hold of yourself and 
"star" yourself in an artistic 
role, which is so clearly possi- 
ble, seen in the rhythm of your 
writting, your printed s's, and 
your almost figure 8 g's. 

When you stop peeling down 
the past and begrudging those 
who, unintentionally, forgot to 
hand you a lead part, when 
you recognize yourself as a 
person with potential, then, 
your drama of life will begin. 
And your husband and chil- 
dren will be your supporting 
cast. 

D.J. 



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Equal rights should apply 
to popping the question 



By ANN RUDY 
Copley News Service 

Why the womens' move- 
ment hasn't attacked the 
structure of the marriage pro- 
posal I'll never know. 

Men are obviously in the 
driver's seat, as was made 
only too clear recently when 
23-year-old Steven Lester of 
Ventura, California proposed 
to his girl friend, Kim, while 
driving around town in his 
pick-up truck. 

Whether or not he used the 
truck to pick-up Kim was not 
made entirely clear in the 
newspaper story I read, but 
the end result was clear: he 
popped the question and she 
was so overwhelmed she fell 
against the passenger door 
and tumbled out. Fortunately, 
she received only minor cuts 
and bruises, which enabled 
her to say "yes" just before 
attendants loaded her into a 
waiting ambulance. 

Now, we women all know 
Kim must have used a little 
subtle and maybe even obvi- 
ous strategy to lead old Steven 
on, but still, the actual pro- 
posal had to come from him. 
How long poor Kim had to 
wait for results is only too evi- 
dent by her plop onto the 
roadway. 

Frankly, I hadn't given this 
angle of womens' rights much 




thought since my husband 
proposed to me after three 
dates — no tribute to my 
charms but, rather, evidence 
of his impatience which has 
carried over into our mar- 
riage. He is a man who likes 
his two minute eggs in thirty 
seconds. 

Still, there are women who 
have had to wait as long as a 
year after bringing up the big 
guns of false eyelashes, musk 
at the pulse points and inti- 
mate dinners in the back seat 
of a Datsun. 

Worse yet, I had an aunt 



who waited 15 years for a man 
20 years her senior, and when 
they were finally married he 
didn't say, "I do," he said, "I 
wish I could." 

Clearly, the marriage pro- 
posal should be an equal op- 
portunity venture. If a girl 
was allowed to propose at will 
she would not only save on 
musk, but a lot of nasty acci- 
dents, such as falling out of 
moving cars, could be 
avoided. And any man who 
was offended by it could just 
stay home with his cat and a 
pot of tea. 



By RD7 TOBIN 

Dear Mrs. Tobin: I saw a 
lady leave her package on a 
bus when she got off. I wanted 
to tell her but I didn't know 
what to call her, "Madam,," 
"Miss," "Lady" or "Hey, 
you." I told the driver about 
the forgotten package and he 
took it to the company lost and 
found. — Tongue Tied 



RIGHTS 'N WRONGS 

What to call a lady 



Dear Tongue Tied: "Par- 
don me, Madam," or "Pardon 
me, Miss," (depending on the 
woman's age) would have 
gotten her attention. "Hey, 
you," denies the woman of 
any title of dignity. 

Dear Mrs. Tobin: We in- 
vited friends to crew for us 
during a yacht club race. It 
was to start at 10 a.m. and it 
would take us at least half an 
hour to reach the starting line. 
They had not showed up by 
nine-thirty so we left without 
them. Our relationship has 



been very cool ever since. 
Who owes who an apology? — 
Slow Starter 

Dear Slow Starter: They 
are in your debt. And who 
ever said they were sailors? 
They should take, a refresher 
course on the rules of good 
seamanship. 

P.S. Are you sure you gave 
them definite instructions on 
the timing? All invitations 
should be issued with explicit 
when, where, what and why 
information. 



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Thursday, January 17, 1974 Quincy Sun Page 9 



Your Horoscope Guide 



For The Week Of 
Jan. 20-26 

By GINA 
Copley News Service 

ARIES: (March 21 to April 

19 — Also Aries Ascendant) — 

Community activities are fa- 
vored. Give close attention to 
career — be alert to oppor- 
tunities. Resist desire to play 
instead of work. Strengthen 
bonds of friendship with ac- 
quaintances and associates. 

TAURUS: (April 20 to May 

20 — Also Taurus Ascendant) 

— Adapt to changing routines 
on the job. Work toward effi- 
ciency procedures. Don't pro- 
crastinate and allow prob- 
lems to accumulate. Public 
performance is favored. Ex- 
tend friendship to associate at 
work. 

GEMINI: (May 21 to June 
20 — Also Gemini Ascendant) 

— Everyone seems helpful 
and assists in your current 
project. Resist desire to force 
issues and work more care- 
fully with attention to details. 
Indulge in artistic and cultur- 
al pursuits. Travel is favored. 

CANCER: (June 21 to July 
22 — Also Cancer Ascendant) 

— Good time for quiet con- 
templation on your future — 
consider your goals and capa- 
bilities. Mate or partner may 
get a financial increase. Your 
ideas and advice can be in- 
strumental in his achieving 
this. 



FOOD BILL 

America's food bill was $118 
billion in 1971, $51.7 billion less 
than it would have been if 
shoppers paid 23 per cent of 
their spendable income for 
food as they did in 1950. — 
CNS 



LEO: (July 23 to August 22 

— Also Leo Ascendant) — Get 
outside yourself and study the 
situation and possible opposi- 
tion objectively. Don't let 
frustration push you to anger. 
Consultation with another for 
advice can be beneficial. Get 
enough rest — don't overdo. 

VIRGO: (August 23 to Sept. 
22 — Also Virgo Ascendant) — 
Social opportunities beckon 
and there is possibility of a 
dream come true. Don't let 
your ego get out of hand. Re- 
sist angry conflict with loved 
one. Don't dwell on the past — 
concentrate on the future. 

LIBRA: (Sept. 23 to Oct. 22 

— Also Libra Ascendant) — 
Take some quiet time to 
meditate and plan — intention 
is high now. Unusual interests 
beckon. Resist tendency to- 
ward extravagance. Enjoy 
friends and possibly romance 
that is more a meeting of the 
minds. 

SCORPIO: (Oct. 23 to Nov. 
21 — Also Scorpio Ascendant) 

— Concentrate on domestic 
affairs now. Good time to re- 
pair, remodel your home. Go 
out of your way to be kind to 
someone who is emotionally 
upset. Activities with children 
are favored. Give security. 

SAGITTARIUS: (Nov. 22 to 
Dec. 21 — Also Sagittarius As- 
cendant) — Past situations 
have turned out well but don't 
take things for granted. Long- 
distance messages require 



HOT ITEM 

"Americans are still getting 
more energy from firewood 
than from atomic reactors," 
Frank N. Jkard, president of 
the American Petroleum In- 
stitute, said. — CNS 



consideration before you 
commit yourself. Resist tak- 
ing selfish attitudes when you 
don't get your way. 

CAPRICORN: (Dec. 22 to 
Jan. 19 — Also Capricorn As- 
cendant) — Your energies run 
high — direct them into pro- 
ductive channels. Avoid los- 
ing your temper and handle 
whatever comes along calm- 
ly. Be less conservative in 
your thinking. Improve your 
job skills and abilities. 

AQUARIUS: (Jan. 20 to 
Feb. 18 — Also Aquarius As- 
cendant) — Social life is ac- 
cented. Be sure you look your 
best and exude charm. Enter- 
taining at home is favored. 
Make decisions carefully — 
don't be rushed. Be adaptable 
to changes required in the 
home situation. 

PISCES: (Feb. 19 to March 
20 — Also Pisces Ascendant) 
— Work behind the scenes 
now on secret meetings and 
activities. Trust intuition and 
be guided by it. Ideas that 
cannot be put into operation 
now should be filed for a later 
date. Set up a workable budg- 
et. 

You can learn astrology at 
home and set up your own 
birth chart and charts of your 
friends. A Home Study Course 
in Beginners Astrology is 
available. For information, 
write: Your Horoscope Guide, 
Copley News Service, in care 
of this newspaper. 



BRIGHT IDEA 
Dust light bulbs and wash 
glass or plastic fixtures regu- 
larly to get more light from 
each bulb. — CNS 



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LET'S TALK 

Marital fighting rules 



By REV. W. LEE TRUMAN 
Copley News Service 

The new trend in pastoral 
marital counseling and treat- 
ment by psychologists is to re- 
channel the violence which is 
found in marriage. This is 
done by changing the way in 
which a couple fights. By put- 
ting rules in the game, it al- 
lows a couple to find out why 
they are fighting and then lets 
them fight fairly and not de- 
structively. 

If you want to fight, you 
have to fight fairly and for a 
purpose if there is to be a hap- 
py marriage. First, and most 
critical, is the need to pick the 
right time and the right place. 
A bad time and place is at the 
dining table, another is in the 
bedroom. 

To fight fair, there has to be 
a place that is neutral ground 
to both. The kitchen is most 
often the wife's area, so that is 
to be avoided. The garage or 
workshop is most often the 
husband's, so that too should 
be off limits. 

Not only should the place be 
chosen with some thought, but 
a right time should also be 
given some thought. It should 
be a time when both partners 
feel able to cope with anger 
and disagreement. This 
means it should be a time 
when the blood sugar level is 
up. 

If the wife knows the hus- 
band has had a run-in with his 
boss, there cannot be any 
fruitful fighting because he 
will take out the anger toward 
his job on her. 

Don't put off communica- 
tion in the fight. Leave time to 
work things out to some con- 
clusion. Namely, don't throw 
a verbal rock at your husband 
when he goes out the door for 
work or when you are both 
ready to go out for the evening 
with friends. There needs to 
be time for follow-through to 
have healthy and productive 
fighting. 

Now executives can 
'brown-bag' in style 

With rising food costs, more 
people are carrying lunches to 
work, but carrying a brown 
paper bag is no way to im- 
press the boss as being an up- 
and-coming junior executive. 

So King-Seely Thermos Co. 
has put together a genuine 
lunch box made to look Like an 
attache case. — CNS 



Next, don't save up your 
complaints over a long period 
of time. Talking about angers 
and frustrations as often and 
openly as possible prevents 
anger stockpiling. The part- 
ner can only feel covered up 
by these amassed grievances, 
and so feels overwhelmed and 
reacts either with physical 
violence or emotionally over- 
reacts. 

Honestly try to learn to 
recognize the difference be- 
tween complaining and blam- 
ing. An honest complaint de- 
serves an honest hearing. 
Blaming brings about defen- 
sive thinking. Sentences that 
are blame oriented begin 
with, "You always ..." in- 
stead of "I feel ..." 

Try taping your quarrels 
sometime, and in any event 
listen to your voice during a 
quarrel. Do not listen to the 
words, but to the sound of 
your voice, and note if you are 
whining or if you are blaming. 

As you grow in your rela- 
tionship, learn to listen behind 
the words. "You don't ever 
tell me that you love me," can 
mean that "I am scared of 
losing you and I want more 
assurances of your caring and 
love." 

Marital fights are some- 
times destructive because 
there is nobody listening. 
There are interruptions. Each 
cuts the other off, and the 
fight winds up in a solo emo- 
tional adrenalin jag. This 
deepens the grievances and 
the separation. 

The most important fact to 
remember is that you don't 
have to be a winner. Any 
argument has two goals, one 
of which is to win the argu- 
ment only. The other, in mar- 
riage, is to arrive at an under- 
standing and to bring healing 
into that marriage. It is wise 
to pick your argument goal 
carefully if there is to be 
healthy good marital fighting. 



Now a geranium 
you grow from seed 

Carefree geraniums are a 
recently introduced race of 
hybrid geraniums which 
gardeners can grow from 
seed. 

These "All-America Win- 
ners" make strong, rapid 
growth and, unlike other 
geraniums, they come true to 
color. — CNS 



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Page 10 Quincy Sun Thursday, January 17, 1974 

Norfolk County Horticulture 
Historical Society Topic 



Rev. Daniel F. Dunn will 
speak on "The Influence of 
Norfolk County Horticulture" at 
the regular meeting of the 
Quincy Historical Society Jan. 
24 at 7:30 p.m. in United First 
Parish Church hall. 

Fr. Dunn is a member of the 
Quincy Historical Society, vice 
president of the Dorchester 



Historical Society and a life 
member of the Massachusetts 
Horticultural Society. 

During the social period 
following the meeting, the 
Quincy Historic District Study 
Committee's new audio-visual 
presentation "From Yesterday 
to Tomorrow in Quincy" will be 
shown. 



MONEY TALKS' 



Gals Are Making 

No Headway 
Toward Equal Pay 



ByPhikpJ U 
Pr««tant 
COLONIAL FEDERAL SAVINGS 
And Loan Aaociatton 
of Quincy and Hofcrook 

• « WMfctfayi |V7iM Ttwtnday* 




Despite the efforts during recent 
years toward equal rights for women, 
the gals seem to be making little 
headway toward reducing income 
differences by sex. In fact, they are 
losing ground; the male-female 
earning differential is greater now 
then it was fifteen years ago. The 
median income for a full-time 
year-round female worker in 1972 
was approximately 57 per cent that 
of her male counterpart as against 64 
per cent during the mid-1950's. 

A recent report by the Census 
Bureau reveals that for year-round 
full-time workers, the median income 
of females with eight years of 
elementary school education was 
55.4 per cent of their male 
counterparts. Females with four 
years of high school had a median 
income which was 55.7 per cent of 
equally educated males. Females with 
four or more years of college had a 
median income which was 60.0 per 
cent of males of equal educational 
attainment. 

The income differences by sex are 
pronounced and persistent, according 
to the Census Bureau; there is no 
prospect that it will change in the 
near future. 

* * * 

The National Consumer Finance 
Association observes that 
"pessimistic attitudes about inflation 
and a lack of faith in the 
government's ability to manage the 
economy have continued to erode 
the outlook of consumers." 



Consumer expectations during the 
second quarter of 1973 about their 
personal financial situation and about 
general business conditions are now 
less favorable than at the low point 
of the 1970 recession, according to 
the Index of Consumer Sentiment. 
Many consumers believe that now is a 
good time to buy because they 
expect prices to be even higher later 
on. 

And that's how the vicious 
inflationary cycle feeds on itself. 
* * * 

Where does the Federal 
Government get its revenues? Three 
tax sources provided about 90 per 
cent of total Federal government 
revenues in 1972, according to a 
recent report by the Federal Reserve 
Bank of Chicago. 

They are, in this order of 
importance: The personal income 
tax, contributions for social 
insurance [largely social security], 
and the corporate income tax. 

Personal income taxes have been 
the single most important source of 
Federal revenue since 1943 and 
provided about 45 per cent of 1972 
revenues. Contributions to social 
insurance have grown to be the 
second largest source at 28 per cent 
of 1972 revenues. The relative 
importance of the corporate income 
tax has declined steadily from just 
over 3 1 per cent of 1929 revenues to 
about 16 per cent of 1972 revenues. 

We suspected all along that we 
were carrying the lion's share of the 
burden, didn't we? 



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Won., Tues., Wed. & Sat. 9:30 - 5 JO Open til 9 Thurs. & Fri. Nights 



Wollaston O.E.S. Sponsors 19th Antiques Show 



The 19th South Shore 
Antiques Show and Sale, 
sponsored by Wollaston Chapter, 
Order Eastern Star, will be held 
at Quincy Masonic Temple, 
1170 Hancock St., Jan. 20- 22. 

The carefully selected dealers 
have prepared to exhibit their 
finest in antiques, which will 
include china, jewelry, furniture, 
dolls and many, many more 
interesting and desirable articles. 

A Snack Bar, featuring 
home-cooked food, will be open 
for luncheon at 1 1:30 a.m. and 
remain open during the hours of 
the show, 1 - 10 p.m. 

Mrs. C. Sherman Mowbray of 
Quincy is general chairman. The 
steering committee consists of 
Mrs. Virgil L. Snell, chairman, 
Mrs. Arthur I. Senter, both of 
Quincy, and Mrs. Alice I. 
Hathaway of South Weymouth. 
Tickets will be available at the 
door. 




SOUTH SHORE ANTIQUES SHOW - Mrs. Virgil L. Snell [left] , 
Chairman of the Steering Committee and Mrs. Hazel M. Sjoberg, 
Marshfield, admire a primitive painting on wood from a church in 
Pecos circa 1648. 



Rev., Mrs. Chester Porteus To Be Honored 



Rev. and Mrs. Chester A. 
Porteus will be honored at a 
Vesper service and reception 
Sunday at Christ Episcopal 
Church, Quincy. 

The service will be held at 4 
p.m., with the reception 
following. 

Rev. Mr. Porteus retired Dec. 
31 after 29 years as rector. He 
had been rector since 1944. 

Principal speaker will be Very 
Rev. Dr. Charles Buck, Dean of 
St. Paul's Cathedral, Boston. 
Celebrant of the service will be 
Rev. John M. Gallop, rector of 
St. John the Evangelist Church 



in Hingham. 

Rev. Mr. Porteus, a native of 
Maiden and a graduate of Boston 
University was a student at 
Episcopal Theological School 
and a lay reader at St. Luke's 
Church, Maiden, when he was 
ordained one of the youngest 
Episcopal priests. 

He received his bachelor ot 
divinity degree six months later. 

He came to Christ Church in 
1 944 after serving parishes in 
upper Manhattan and the Bronx 
in New York City, Dorchester, 
Natick and Hopkinton. 

Rev. Mr. Porteus plans to 



continue 

Episcopalian 

remains as 

Quincy 

Quincy 

Masonic 

Grotto. 



writing for 

publications and 

chaplain of the 

Fire Department, 

Rotary Club, Rural 

Lodge and Taleb 



Rev. Mr. Porteus will also 
teach a class the "History of the 
American Episcopal Church" at 
the Diocesan School of St. Paul's 
Cathedral, Boston beginning in 
February. 

He and his wife, the former 
Greta Ramsey, are now living in 
South Braintree. 



11 Host Families, Officials Plan Amity Aide 



Eleven Amity Aide Host 
Families met recently at the 
home of Mr. and Mrs. Jack 
Silverstein, Adams St., Quincy 
to prepare for the Amity Aide 
Program in it's fourth 
consecutive year in the Quincy 
Public Schools from Jan. 21 to 
June 1 . 

School Supt. Dr. Lawrence 
Creedon thanked the Host 
Families in behalf of the Quincy 
Public Schools for "your 
support and for the international 
friendship and goodwill which 
your hospitality will generate". 

Ellis Swartz, Coordinator of 
Foreign Languages discussed 
arrangements for the arrival of 
the Amity Aides and 
school-scheduling for them. 

Swartz said that his type of 
program creates cross-cultural 
impressions and expressed his 



hope "that our community will 
have contributed in this manner 
to the everlasting hope of 
mankind for peace, love, and 
brotherhood for all peoples in 
our universe" 

He explained to the Host 
Families that these Aides will be 
working with all Foreign 
Language groups in the Quincy 
Public Schools to enhance and 
enrich the conversational and 
cultural aspects of the Foreign 
Language Program. The Aides 
will also make cultural 
presentations to students in the 
elementary schools. 

Also participating in the 
meeting were: William Phinney, 
Assistant Superintendent of 
Instruction; Carl Deyeso, 
Coordinator of Language Arts 
and Social Studies; and the 
following Host Families: 

Mr. and Mrs. Jack Silverstein, 



Braveman, 


Dominic 


and 


Mrs. 


and 


Mrs. 


and 


Mrs. 


and 


Mrs. 


and 


Mrs. 


and 


Mrs. 


. and 


Mrs. 



Mr. and Mrs. Melvin 
Mr. and Mrs. 
D'Arcangelo, Mr. 
Joseph Feeney, Mr. 
Robert Blake, Mr. 
Rubin Sugannan, Dr. 
Donald Reed, Mr. 
Charles White, Mr. 
Joseph Schwartz, Mr 
William Myers. 

The Amity Aides who will be 
living with these Host Families 
are: 

French-speaking - from 
France: Jean-Pierre Genet, 
Marie-Pascale Gru, Pierre-Alain 
De Chalus. 

German-speaking - from 
Switzerland: Ruth Hohl, Esther 
Oettli. 

Spanish-speaking - from 
Uruguay, Hector Aprile; from 
Mexico, Hilda Jimenez; from 
Bolivia, Fresia de Vidaurre. 



3 From Quincy In Thayer Academy Production 



Three Quincy residents are 
taking part in 'Purlie Victorious' 
a drama to be presented at 
Thayer Academy tonight 
[Thursday] and Friday, at 8 
p.m. in Frothingham Hall. The 



Thayer Academy Parents Club 
will sponsor the event with Mrs. 
Robert Geogan of Rockland, 
music and drama chairman in 
charge of arrangements. 

Philip Jaspon, of Quincy, is a 



member of the cast. 

Peter Larrington and Carolyn 
Yurkstas of Quincy are members 
of the production staff. 

Tickets will be available at the 
door at each performance. 



Education Law To Be Discussed At St. Coletta's 



St. Coletta's Day School, 
Braintree, will present two 
experts on educational law 
tonight (Thursday! at 8 p.m. 
who will discuss the Educational 



3E 



Bill 766 which will become 
effective in September. 

The speakers -- Dr. Alice 
Casey, associate superintendent 
of schools in Boston, and Dr. 



HAIR STVlIST 
1 8 COTTAGE AVE., QUINCY 



" SPECIAL Tues., Wed. and Thurs. 

Shampoo & Set . . . s 2 50 Shampoo, Cut & Set . 5 4 50 
Tint touch up . . . s 6 50 Permanents horn . . s 8" 
Perfect Touch Perms . . . s 14 50 
« "SENIOR CITIZENS Shompo, & Set $2-Perms $7.95 




v Walk In Service ^ Stylist Prices Slightly Higtier 
VCLOSED MONDAYS PHONE 773-2 \ 4 1 



Vincent P. Connors, director ot 
special classes in Boston - will 
explain this new law which 
provides for the education, 
transportation to school and 
special needs of emotionally 
disturbed and retarded children 
from ages three to 21 years. 

According to the new law, "it 
is the responsibility of each 
town to provide education for 
children with special needs." 

A St. Coletta's School 
spokesman said that the problem 
with the new law will be in 
implementing it. 

"The towns are having trouble 
raising the money to pay special 
staff, and each town is 
interpreting the law differently. 
The speakers should bo of vital 
interest to all parents and 
anyone else interested." 



Thursday, January 17, 1974 Quiricy Sun Page 1 1 



The 

Money Tree Bank 

proudly presents 

The Money Tree Maxi Statement Account 



What the Money Tree Maxi Statement Is: 



Checking Account: Savings Accounts: Loans: 



In order to qualify for Maxi 
Statement, you'll need two 
things: a checking account 
and a savings account. Your 
checking account is free. 
You may write as many checks 
as you wish and you don't 
need to worry about keeping a 
minimum balance. 



You'll need one savings 
account with a monthly 
minimum balance of S200. 
Interest on our regular and 
90-day Notice Accounts 
(S5(X) minimum balance) is 
earned at the maximum rate 
allowable by law. 



Other accounts, such as 
instalment loans, may be 
included on your Maxi 
Statement. Maxi Statement 
customers are allowed six 
accounts exclusive of 
checking account. They are 
the basic savings account plus 
any combination of five others. 



Maxi Transfer: 

With Maxi Statement, you can 
move your money between 
accounts easier than ever 
before. Just fill out a transfer 
slip, present or mail it to us. 
and we will promptly make the 
transfer. You may also set up a 
regular transfer program for a 
systematic savings plan. 



Maxi Credit: 

You may also apply for 
personal "line of credit" — 
Maxi Credit — on your Maxi 
Statement. You may borrow 
from Maxi Credit up to your 
prearranged limit. Maxi Credit 
also gives you built-in 
overdraft protection. 



^HANCXX:K BANK The Money Tree 

1495 Hancock Streel Oumcy. Mass 02169 MAXI 

STATEMENT 



STATEMENT 
DATE 




w 



Ikm to Read the 
Maxi Statement: 

The Maxi Statement is practical, 
easy-to-read, and very complete. You 
won't find a more efficient way to bank. 

If you have any questions or would like 

additional information, the name of 

your personal banker is included. 
• Checking account transact ions are listed here. 

All savings accounts transactions are 

noted here. 

Information on instalment loans is included 

in this area. 

MaxiCredit transact ionsare listed here. 

Maxi Credit interest rates are noted here. 



Who Should Have 
Maxi Statement: 

Everybody. Why? Because 
Maxi Statement makes things 
easier for you. Maxi Statement 
combines your Hancock Bank 
checking, savings and loan 
accounts together into one 
convenient statement, once a 
month. We've made sure Maxi 
Statement gives you the most 
efficient and practical method 
ever devised to manage your 
banking requirements. 



Where You Open a Money Tree Maxi Statement Account: 

There are fifteen Hancock Bank offices located south and west of Boston: 
eight South Shore offices, telephone 773-0500; seven Mid County offices, 
telephone 769- 1300. If you are currently banking with us. ask your 
Hancock banker for our comprehensive brochure, including applications, 
on Maxi Statement. If you are not banking with us. please call. Our 
operators will direct you to our nearest office. Our people 

will be happy Alb ^ to talk with you! 



HANCOCK 
BANK 

Main office in Quincy Center with 14 branches spread out south and west 
of Boston. Quincy 773-0500, Norwood 769-1300. 




Member F.D. I.C. 



Page 12 Quincy Sun Thursday, January 17, 1974 



Ouincy High-Voc. Tech NEWS 



Written by members of the Quincy High School Journalism Class 



VMUGHT SAVING VMB 




Mid-Term Exams Set For Jan. 23-25 



Let The Sun Shine 



By ED EICOFF 

Did you ever wake up in the 
middle of the night and look out 
your bedroom window to see 
the yards lit up by the moon? 
Students now experience this act 
of nature as they trudge to school 
in the dark at 7:30 in the 
morning. 

When asked how she felt 
about the change in time, QHS 
student Donna Ternullo replied, 
"It's dangerous not only for kids 
with cars but also for little kids. 
I don't feel we are saving 
energy." 

Many of the students do not 
see the point of going back to 
daylight saving time. They are 
afraid of being hit while walking 



to school or they're scared they 
will hit someone if they drive. 

They are more frightened for 
the elementary school children 
than anything else. Charlene 
DeAngelis said, "Even if we 
don't have to, they should let 
the little kids go to school at 9." 
Some of the students kind of 
like the idea of walking in the 
dark. It was mostly the boys 
that found it enjoyable. 

When you do get up in the 
dark, you feel like you've been 
cheating on sleep but you really 
haven't. 

One boy remarked, "I don't 
like waking up before the birds 
but I do enjoy seeing the sun rise 
around lunch time. 



Discount Tickets For 
Quincy, Celtics Games 



The Quincy High School 
basketball team will play Maiden 
High School Friday at 5 p.m. at 
Boston Garden. 

Immediately following the 
Quincy High game, the Boston 
Celtics will play the Atlanta 



FILL OUT THIS SUBSCRIPTION BLANK AND MAIL 

TO TNE QUINCY SUN 1101 HANCOCK ST.; QUINCY 02119 

52 ISSUES FOR I3.B0 
NAME 





Hawks. 

Tickets are available in the 
Quincy High Guidance Office at 
a discount. A $3 ticket costs $2 
and entitles you to see both 
Quincy High and the Celtics. 

BILL JOYCE 



SUBSCRIPTION FORM 



By KATHYMELACHER 

The week of mid-year exams 
will arrive shortly. Listed below 
is a schedule of the examination 
periods and other pertinent 
information. 

Exams will be held 
Wednesday, Jan. 23 and Friday, 
Jan. 25. Students must spend 
the entire 90 minutes in the 
examination room. They may 
use the cafeteria area, library or 
resource rooms for studying 
between exams but are not to be 
in the corridors or stairwells 
during exam periods. 



Students have the option of 
making arrangements with a 

teacher to -take third and sixth 
period exams at another time 
and the responsibility to make 
arrangements for make-up work. 



WEDNESDAY 


Period 


Time 


1 

2 


8:15-9:45 
10:00- 11:30 


Lunch 

3 


11:55- 12:10 
12:15- 1:45 



THURSDAY 

Period Time 

4 8:15-9:45 

5 10:00-11:30 
Lumch 11:35-12:10 

6 12:15-1:45 
FRIDAY 

Period Time 

4 8:15-9:45 

Make-up 10:00-11:30 
Lunch 11:35-12:10 

Student lunches will be served 
in the Voc-Tech cafeteria 
Wednesday - Friday, 11:35 - 
12:10. On Jan. 28, students 
should follow their schedule for 
day 4 of the 6 day cycle. 



First Literary Magazine Soon To Debut 



By GAYLE ROSENBLATT 

This school year will see the 
publication of Quincy High 
School's First Literary Magazine. 

This new magazine will 
feature the finest writing by 
Quincy High students ever 
assembled. A hard working staff 
is already busy planning for the 



first issue. 

The staff of the Literary 
Magazine cannot provide all the 
material needed, therefore, to 
tap the creative energies of all 
the students, there will be a 
short story contest running 
through the month of January. 
All stories must be original, and 
prizes will be awarded to the 



winners. Watch for further 
details. 

All other contributions to the 
magazine whether they be 
poems, anecdotes, jokes, essays, 
descriptions, fables or satires, are 
welcomed now, and can be 
submitted to the staff in the 
English Resource Center or to 
Mr. Weeks. 



Girls Sports Program 
Includes Varsity, Intramural 



By SUSAN WINTERMEYER 

There are a number of sports 
available to the girls at Quincy 
High School. 

The varsity sports start in the 
fall with Field Hockey and 
continue into the winter with 
Gymnastics and Basket ball. 

Our spring sports consist of 
Tennis, Track and Softball. 



Quincy High's girl's teams are 
part of the Greater Boston 
League at this time. Next year, 
however, they will become part 
of the Suburban League. 

Also, there are intramural 
sports for girls held after school. 
Football and Badminton are 
held during the fall, regularly, as 
are Badminton, Tennis and 
Volleyball during the spring. 



Intramural Floor Hockey is held 
during the winter, whenever the 
gym is available. This year, there 
is a possibility of after-school 
bowling for girls also. 

Our varsity girl's teams are 
looking forward to a good year. 
Many of you come to see our 
boy's teams play. Why not come 
sometime to see how our girl's 
teams are doing? 



Students Don't Labor Council To Give 
Think DST $20,000 In Scholarships 

Saves Energy 



Do you think daylight savings 
time is saving energy? 

Seventy-three out of 100 
students polled at Quincy High 
School replied "no". 

Twenty-one said "yes". 

And six had no opinion. 



newsboys Wanted 

Here's a chance to earn extra 
money by building a Quincy 
Sun home delivery route. 
Telephone: 471-3100 





STATE 



ZIP CODE 



CHECK ONE OF TWO BOXES BELOW 

[ ] ENCLOSED IS MY CHECK FOR $3.50 
[ ] PLEASE BILL ME FOR $3.50 
OUT OF STATE $4.50 





All seniors in public and 
parochial high schools in 
Massachusetts are invited to 
participate in the scholarship 
awards program conducted by 
the Massachusetts State Labor 
Council, AFL-CIO. 

There are over $20,000 in 
scholarships, including a $1,000 
scholarship in memory of late 
President John F. Kennedy and 
a $1,000 scholarship in memory 
of Francis E. Lavigne, former 
Director of the Department of 
Education and Research of the 
Massachusetts State Labor 
Council. Other awards given by 
affiliates of the Council are in 
amounts ranging from $100 to 
$1,000. 

High school seniors must file 
application in their respective 
high schools prior to March 15. 
The examination is comprised of 



a series of questions dealing with 
the subject of labor in the 
United States. The two-hour 
examination will also include an 
essay dealing with Labor and 
related matters. 

John A. Callahan, Director of 
COPE and Education for the 
Massachusetts State Labor 
Council, is expecting 
substantially more senior boys 
and girls to participate in the 
1974 awards program than have 
in the previous years. Callahan 
noted a greater interest on the 
part of young people seeking 
financial aid to help defray the 
costs of higher education. 

Examination study kits will 
be forwarded to high schools 
throughout the state during 
January and all seniors 
contemplating participation 
should notify the proper 
authorities at their school. 



HOW TO SHOVE A PUSHER 

If you have seen illegal drugs being sold or know where a 
pusher operates you can help end this dangerous traffic with a 
simple letter to the Police Department. 

Put down everything you know about the pusher and his 
operation and send the letter to Lieutenant Walter Lynch, 
Quincy Police Department, Southern Artery, Quincy, Mass. or 
Call 479-1212, Ext. 348. 



Thursday, January 17, 1974 Quincy Sun Page 13 



About $2.2 Million In Wages 

Clay St. Seniors Complex Hailed As Boon To Economy 



The $4.4 million Clay St. 
senior citizens housing complex 
is hailed as both filling a big 
need and as an economic boon 
for the area. 

Gov. Francis W. Sargent called 
the 12-story 200-unit facility an 
example of "senior power" and 
praised the planning which 
placed it handy to the MBTA, 
the shopping and business areas. 
Later Carmine D'Olimpio, 
president of the Quincy-South 
Shore Building Trades Council 
[AFL-CIO] told The Quincy 
Sun the project would 
tremendously help the area 
economically. 

"About half of the estimated 
cost will be wages for workers," 
he estimated. "And about half 
of the workers will come from 
the Quincy-South Shore area." 
He estimated that the 
construction will take 
approximately a year and a half 
to complete. 

"It will tremendously help the 
area economically," he said. 

State and city officials 
gathered at the Wollaston Golf 
Club last Friday for lunch and 
then met at the Wollaston 
Lutheran Church's Fenno House 
for the signing of necessary 
agreements to pave the way for 
construction of the state-aided 
Clay St. project. 

Gov. Sargent, at the luncheon 
called the project "a partnership 
between Quincy and the state 
that believes that older citizens 
are not forgotten citizens." 

He commended Sen. Arthur 
Tobin, Mayor Walter J. Hannon, 
former Mayor James R. 
Mclntyre and Forrest I. Neal, 
chairman of the MBTA Board 
"for truly, the planning was 
properly done" relative to 
transportation, shopping and 
business areas. 

Later at Fenno House more 
than 200 residents of senior 
citizens facility witnessed the 
signing of the agreements. 

"This is an example of senior 
power," he declared. "Senior 
citizens must never be forgotten 
citizens. You don't want to be 
put on a shelf somewhere. You 
want to take part." 

The Governor praised Fenno 
House as a fine housing facility 
and said more like it are needed. 
"Some people are in nursing 
homes who shouldn't be there," 
he noted. 

Participating in the signing 
ceremonies with the Governor 
were Mayor Hannon, Senator 
Tobin, Francis X. McCauley, 
chairman of the Quincy Housing 
Authority, Lewis R. Crampton, 
state Commissioner of 
Community Affairs, Architect 
Joseph Donahue of Quincy and 
J. Norman Welch of J. J. Welch, 
Inc., general contractor. 



MUSIC LESSONS 

Professional Instruction 
DRUM PIANO GUITAR 
WOLLASTON MUSIC CENTER 
27 Beale St., Wollaston 
Call 773-5325 



Also on hand were Rep. 
Joseph E. Brett, Rep. William 
Delahunt, Rep. Thomas 
Brownell, Re p. -Councillor 
Clifford Marshall, Ward 5 
Councillor Warren Powers, Ward 
6 Councillor Dennis E. 
Harrington, Ward 3 Councillor 
John J. Lydon, Clement 
O'Brien, executive director 
Quincy Housing Authority, John 
Cattaneo, assistant director, Rev. 
Bauer, Rev. Ronald Ober, 
Wollaston Methodist, Rev. 
Edward Flaherty, St. Ann's, 
Rev. Bedros Baharian, City 
Planning Board chairman. 

Earlier at the luncheon, 
McCauley praised former Mayor 
Mclntyre and the City Council 
for initiating the project more 
than three years ago. 

"It is a much needed facility," 
he said. "It will be a credit to 
the northern end of the city. We 
hope to start construction very 
shortly and have Gov. Sargent 
back in a year and a half to turn 
the key over to the first 
occupant." 

Irving Boyes, president of the 
Wollaston Business and 
Professional Association said the 
complex is needed and expressed 
hope there will be more of them 
in the future. 

George Reardon, president 
South Shore Chamber of 
Commerce said, "We heartily 
endorse this new project." 

The complex calls for 190 
one-bedroom units and 10 
two-bedroom. Ten apartments 
are designed for the 
handicapped. 

The 12th floor will have a 
community room large enough 
to seat 380 persons. It will have 
a kitchen, rest rooms and other 
ancillary spaces. 

The ground level will have the 
new administrative office 
headquarters for the Quincy 
Housing Authority. On that level 
will also be a maintenance 
garage, vestibule, lobbies, tenant 
laundry room, game room and 
lounge. 

The building will be 
landscaped with lawns, trees, 
and shrubbery. There will be 
benches, off-street parking and a 
screened, landscaped passive 
recreation area. 

The Clay St. development, 
originally was proposed in 1968. 
The way was paved for 
construction last month when 
the Department of Community 
Affairs approved and signed a 
commitment for state financing. 

The DCA action came after 
Senator Tobin filed a special bill 
at Mayor Hannon's request, 
which was approved by the 
legislature and quickly signed 
into enactment by the Governor. 

Mayor Hannon called the site 
a "superb location for an elderly 



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WOLLASTON 




CLAY ST. CEREMONIES -- Gov. Francis W. Sargent signs agreements to pave way for construction of 
the state-aided $4.4 million Clay St. senior citizens housing facility at ceremonies at Fenno House, 
Wollaston. He is flanked by Mayor Walter J. Hannon and Sen. Arthur H. Tobin. Standing, from left, are 
J. Norman Welch of J. J. Welch, Inc., general contractor; architect Joseph A. Donahue of Quincy, Lewis 
Crampton, state Commissioner of Community Affairs and Francis X. McCauley, chairman Quincy 
Housing Authority. 

[Quincy Sun Photo by Laban Whittaker] 



housing project." 

He pointed out that the area 
is set back a short distance from 
Hancock St. and within walking 
distance of the Wollaston MBTA 
station; four churches of 
different denominations; three 
super markets; the Post Office; 



three drug stores; a theater; 
several restaurants and many 
specialty shops. 

"The economic impact to the 
Wollaston area when the 
development is populated will be 
of uncalculable value due to the 
recognized purchasing power of 



senior citizens," the Mayor said. 
The 1 2th floor of the building 
will command a picturesque 
view of the city. 

General Contractor of the 
project is James J. Welch and 
Co., Inc. of Salem. 



Fenno House Seniors Plan Food Sale Jan. 23 



M 



Members of the Fenno House 
Senior Citizens Club, will hold a 
Food Sale, at the Fenno House, 
540 Hancock St., Wollaston, 
Wednesday, Jan. 23, from 1 p.m. 
to 4 p.m. 

A variety of food will be on 
sale. There will be a Snack Bar, 
with coffee, etc. Percy MacLean 
and Mike Baldassari will be in 
charge of the Snack Bar. 

Mrs. Maria White will be the 



chairman, assisted by Mrs. Ellen 
Werdelin, Mrs. Karma Janetti 



and Mrs. Ruth Sadlier. The 
public is invited. 



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27 BEAU ST., W0UAST0N 773-5325 



Page 14 Quincy Sun Thursday, January 17, 1974 



DEATHS 



Mrs. Alice [Smith J Wright, 
91, of 123 Brook St., in the 
Presidential Convalescent Home, 
Jan. 8. 

Leon Ouellette, 56, of 180 
High St., Brookline, formerly of 
Quincy, at the Jamaica Plain VA 
Hospital, Jan. 9. 

Mrs. Alice M. [Jenks/ Riel, 
60, of 45 Driftwood Drive, 
Duxbury, formerly of Quincy, at 
her home, Jan. 8. 

John M. McDonald, 93, 
formerly of Sea St., at Nqrwell 
Knoll Nursing Home, Jan. 9. 

William J. Nolan Sr., 85, of 
Buxton Hill, Williams town, 
formerly of Quincy, at his home, 
Jan. 8. 

Herbert M. Hodgkinson, 86, 
of 1000 Southern Artery, at 
home, Jan. 9. 

Joseph A. Coughlin, 77, of 
113 Sandy Beach Road, 
Plymouth, formerly of Quincy, 
at his home, Jan. 8. 

Roy N. Berggren, 70, of 42 
James St., Holbrook, formerly 
of Quincy, unexpectedly at 
Quincy City Hospital, Jan. 8. 

Mrs. Agnes I. [Piccard] Paul, 
77, of 68 Kendall St., at a 
Quincy nursing home, Jan. 8. 

Francis P. Callahan, 67, of 9 
Calumet St., at Quincy City 
Hospital, Jan. 7. 

Mrs. Jane M. [McDonald] 
Flanagan, 41, and nine-year-old 
daughter Jessica B., of Mill Rd, 
Cape Porpoise, Me., formerly of 
Quincy, accidently. Jan. 4, in 
Arundel, Me. 

Thomas S. Duggan Sr., 84, of 
235 Sunrive Ave., Palm Beach, 
Fla., formerly of Quincy, at 
Holy Cross Hospital, Ft. 
Lauderdale, Fla., Jan. 7. 

Bernard J. McNeice Sr., 86, of 
16 West Squantum St., at a local 
nursing home, Jan. 7. 

John M. Smith, 57, of 
Mattapan, formerly of Quincy, 
at home, Jan. 4. 

Charles A. LaFlamme, 69, of 
122 Green St., Jan. 10. 



Mrs. Jessie [ Livingston j 
Robinson, 86, of 116 Beach St., 
at a local nursing home, Jan. 7. 
Miss Elizabeth E. Bock, 1 7, of 
34 Figurehead Lane, at home, 
Jan. 8. 

Mrs. Ellen C. [MyersJ 
Bartlett, 83, of 95 Clay St., at 
Quincy City Hospital, Jan. 7. 

Mrs. Mary E. [SchmitzJ 
Slough, 48, of 71 Warner St., 
Dorchester, N.Y., formerly of 
Quincy, in Rochester, Jan. 6. 

Mrs. Jessie M. [Loetz] 
Koechel, 85, of Sturgis, Mich., 
formerly of Quincy, at a local 
nursing home, Dec. 26. 

Howard L. Noble, 58, of 169 
West Elm Ave., at Carney 
Hospital, Dorchester, Jan. 8. 

Mrs. Ann C. [Taglini] 
Nichols, 54, of 424 Oak St., 
Raynham, formerly of Quincy, 
at Brockton Hospital, Jan. 8. 

Mrs. Elizabeth V. [Sullivan/ 
Johnson, 66, of 99 Wilkins Rd, 
East Braintree, formerly of 
Quincy, at Quincy City Hospital, 
Jan. 8. 

Mrs. Gertrude I Trainor] Ross, 
96, of 44 Ridgeway St., at 
Elmwood Nursing Home, Jan. 
10. 

James N. Bellenis, 65, of 19 
Garfield St., on arrival at Quincy 
City Hospital, Jan. 10. 

Ernest M. Dixon, 80, of 16 
Newbury St., at Quincy City 
Hospital, Jan. 10. 

Richard F. Guerriero, 79, of 
Quincy, in Veterans 
Administration Hospital, 
Jamaica Plain, Jan. 8. 

John E. Walkama, 49, of 30 
Winthrop St., on arrival at 
Quincy City Hospital, Jan. 10. 
Mrs. Ruth M. [Hilstrom] 
MacDonald, 72, of 73 Bicknell 
St., at Lemuel Shattuck 
Hospital, Boston, Jan. 10. 

James R. McShane, 18 
Newport Terrace, at Chelsea 
Naval Hospital, Jan. 10. 

Frederick P. Kingsley of 97 
Willow Ave., unexpectedly at his 
home, Jan. 10. 



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KEOHANE FUNERAL HOME 



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Rev. J. Irving Fletcher, 73, of 
192 School St., at Quincy City 
Hospital, Jan. 13. 

Mrs. Mary [Boudrow] Russo, 
79, of 26 Baxter St., at Quincy 
City Hospital, Jan. 13. 

Mrs. Martha E. [GioiosaJ 
Morrissey, 64, of Mayflower 
Ave., Taunton, formerly of 
Quincy, at Morton Hospital, Jan. 
12. 

Mrs. Wanda R. [Swanson/ 
Sjolin, 76, of 81 Bennington St., 
at Quincy City Hospital, Jan. 13. 

Cornelius J. Scanlon, 73, of 
28 James St., at Tewksbury 
Hospital, Jan. 13. 

Mrs. Ida E. [O'ConnellJ 
Clancy, 86, of 144 Fenno St., at 
Quincy City Hospital, Jan. 13. 

Mrs. Dorothy [Colej 
Youngworth, 64, of 83 
Farrington St., at Carney 
Hospital, Dorchester, Jan. 12. 

Robert D. Haight, 35, of 
Pembroke, formerly of Quincy, 
at South Shore Hospital, 
Weymouth, Jan. 11. 

John J. Dambis, 25, of 59 Mill 
St., at Peter Bent Brigham 
Hospital, Roxbury, Jan. 10. 

Mrs. Amy A. Williams of 107 
Butler Rd, at a local nursing 
home, Jan. 11. 

Mrs. Emma L. [WinslowJ 
Zottoli, 92, of 108 Bromfield 
St., at Quincy City Hospital, 
Jan. 10. 

Harold F. Williams Sr., 65, of 
134 Cushing St., Hingham, 
formerly of Quincy, at South 
Shore Hospital, Weymouth, Jan. 
2. 

Mrs. Mary J. [Coleman J 
Owens, 90, of Quincy at a 
Quincy nursing home, Jan. 1. 

Miss Anna M. Braun, 87, of 
12 Petrel Rd, at her home, Jan. 
2. 

Martin C Kavanagh, 75, of 
141 South Central Ave., at the 
Colonial Nursing Home, 
Weymouth, Jan. 2. 

Mrs. Alice Fym [Woods J 
Lane, 70, of 108 Bromfield St., 
at Peter Bent Brigham Hospital, 
Jan. 1. 

Mrs. Rita [KelleyJ Donnelly, 
59, of 24 Warwick St., at Quincy 
City Hospital, Jan. 14. 

Francis Whitaker, 77, of 66 
Pope St., at the Crestview 
Nursing Home, Jan. 14. 



iv.v.v.':'.-.'.', 



.•.•.•.•.•.•-•••A" 



■.'■■■'■'W.v.w.y.',v.v,v. 



ROY'S 
FLOWERS 

94 WASHINGTON ST 

QUINCY 
MAJOR CREDIT 
CARDS ACCEPTED; 
BY PHONE 

472-1900, 



# 



* . ■ . ' . • . » . ' . * . » . 




Trinity Lutheran Elects, 
Adopts $26,520 Budget 



3mtox 



The annual meeting of the 
Trinity Lutheran Church was 
held Jan. 13 with Pastor James 
Kimmell presiding. Various 
reports of the church 
committees and officers showed 
that much activity and progress 
had been made during 1973. 

A budget of $26,520 was 
adopted for the year, same as in 
1973. 

The following were elected: 

New council members: Mrs. 
Irene Vaino, Mrs. Helvi Ahola, 
Sulo Soini and Donald 
Robinson; treasurer, Douglas 
Luoma; financial secretary, Mrs. 
Elizabeth Larson; clerk, Toivo 
Tuori. 

The following representatives 
were also elected: Social Service 



Bureau, Mrs. Helvi Ahola, Mrs. 
Joan Tuori; District Convention, 
Toivo Tuori, Dr. Ensio Ronka; 
New England Synod 
Convention, Robert Heikkila 
and Edward MacDonald; South 
Shore Council of Churches, Miss 
Helen Heikkila and Dr. Ronka. 

Mrs. Miriam Luoma was 
elected overall publicity 
chairman. 

Miss Fiina Niemi, chairman of 
Finnish publicity. 

It was voted to have the 
Finance Committee organize a 
Fund Raising Project for the 
year 1974. 

When the Council meets in 
February, a vice chairman and 
additional committees will be 
appointed. 



'A Russian Adventure' 
Jan. 23 At First Parish 



"A Russian Adventure" is the 
theme of a special program to be 
presented at United First Parish 
Church, Quincy Sq., Wednesday, 
Jan. 23 at 7:30 p.m. by Dr. and 
Mrs. Walter Wrigley of 
Wollaston. 

Dr. Wrigley, who serves as 
chairman of the church's Board 
of Governors, chaired a scientific 
symposium in Russia this past 
Fall. While there, the Wrigleys 
visited Baku in Azerbaijan and 
Moscow and Leningrad in 
Russia 

Several of Dr. Wrigley's books 



have been translated into 
Russian and the government 
there has been holding his 
royalties which cannot be taken 
out of the country. Dr. Wrigley 
is professor of instrumentation 
and Astronautics at the 
Massachusetts Institute of 
Technology and Educational 
Director of the Charles Stark 
Draper Laboratory. 

The Wrigley's will show 
pictures of their trip. The 
program, which will be open to 
the public, will be held in the 
church's Parish Hall. 



St. John's To Present 
'Centennial Capers 9 



St. John's Parish will present 
"The Centennial Capers" March 
8 and 9 at Archbishop Williams 
High School, Braintree. 

The parish is conducting a 
contest for youngsters in Grades 
1 to 8 to design the program 
cover. The winner will get a $25 
prize. 

Mrs. Frank Lomano, 133 
Presidents Lane, is chairman of 
the contest. Information on it is 



available from Confraternity of 
Christian Doctrine or St. John's 
School teachers. 

Mr. and Mrs. William C. 
Donnelly are general chairmen 
of the show. Putnam Borden and 
James Duggan are co-chairmen 
of the program book and Mrs. 
Marcia Risio and Mrs. Lee 
Wayland are co-chairmen of 
patrons. 



St. Boniface To Present 
'The Good Old Days' Show 



St. Boniface Parish will 
present a minstrel and variety 
show "The Good Old Days" on 
Jan. 26, 27 and 28 at 8 p.m. in 
the Broad Meadows Junior High 
School. 



The director is Ed Rooney 
with choreography by Marianne 
Dennis. 

Tickets at $2.50 are available 
at the St. Boniface rectory. 



Blessed Sacrament Sodality 
To Meet Jan. 22 



The Rev. Cajetan Bendernagel 
of St. Gabriel's Monastery, 
Brighton, will be the featured 
speaker Tues. Jan. 22, at the 
monthly meeting of Our Lady's 



Sodality of Blessed Sacrament 
Church, Hough's Neck. 

The meeting in St. Thomas 
Aquinas Hall will follow a mass 
at 7:30 p.m. at the Church. 



2 Quincy Nurses Attend Heart Course 



Annette Watts and Linda 
Stewart of the Quincy City 
Hospital staff are among 22 





74 ELM STREET-QUINCY 



326 COPELAND STREET 
W. QUINCY 



Director 

JOSEPH SWEENEY 
TtttphtM 773-2721 



nurses from Southeastern 
Massachusetts Hospitals to 
attend a recent two-week course 
in the nurse's role in coronary 
care at the Brockton Hospital 
School of Nursing. 



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Young Ideas 

Unedited selections from the writings 
of Quincy's elementary school children. 



A BUTTERFLY IN SCHOOL 

At Myles Standish School in 
Quincy a butterfly was born. He 
is a Monarch butterfly. Vernon 
Barker and Mark Griffen found a 
butterfly cocoon in an old 
building. Our class saw the 
butterfly hatch from the 
cocoon. He was all folded up 
inside the cocoon. When he 
came out he was beautiful. First 
he flew on a bush, and then he 
flew away. 

Melanie Horton 

Myles Standish School 

Grade 5 

THE LITTLE INDIAN GIRL 
NAMED "SUNSHINE" 

Once upon a time there lived 
a little Indian girl. One day as 
she was strolling through the 
woods, she saw a flower open all 
in one motion. She was 
astonished! Then she saw an elf 
come out. This time she was 
even more astonished. "Whats 
you name?" she asked. "My 
name is 

Sush-mush-gush-lush-me-so," he 
answered. "How did you get so 
little," she asked. "I did not turn 
little I was born this way," he 
answered. "You were born that 
way" she asked. "Yes" he said. 
"May I take you home with 
me?" she asked. "I'll take really 
good care of you. I'll even make 
sure you won't die" she said. 

Many years past. One day as 
she was taking him for a walk. 
Something suddenly happened. 
He fainted for she hadn't been 
feeding him enough. She was 
very sad because she had lied to 
him. So she went home and 
never came out of her teepee 
again. And she learned her lesson 
not to tell someone something if 
your not going to do it say it or 
hear it. The End. 

Ann Albanese 

Mass Fields School 

Grade 3 



LET'S GO SKATING 

In the winter I like to go 
skating. I go over my frind's 
house and we go skating 
together. After we go skating, 
my friend and I sit near the 
fireplace and get warm. 

Kathleen Cotter 

Atherton Hough School 

Grade 4 




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A WINTER POEM 

I wish it would snow tonight, 
So I can have a snowball fight. 
And all the friends that I 
know, 

Will have fun in the snow. 
And we will all skate, 
Till real, real late. 
And when we go to sled, 
Someone will hit their head. 
Michael Guidice 
Atherton Hough School 
Grade 4 

WINTER TIME 

Winter is fun, 

See the children run. 

Children like to play, 

On a snowy winter day. 

Santa comes on a sled, 

While the children are in bed. 

If you are good, 

As you should, 

You will get a toy, 

And have a lot of joy. 

Judy Hamel 

Atherton Hough School 

Grade 4 



WHAT I LIKE TO DO 
IN THE WINTER 

I love to skate and play 

hockey. I am glad when the 

ponds freeze. I like to go 

sledding too. I have a toboggon 

and love to go down on it and go 

over the big bumps. This year I 

am going skiing. This is my first 

time going. I am going to ski up 

at Blue Hills. The only thing I 

don't like about winter is when 

my brother hits me with 

snowballs, but I like to hit him! 

Mark Boussy 

Atherton Hough School 

Grade 4 



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Thursday, January 17, 1974 Quincy Sun Page 15 



omm 



NORTH OUINCY 



14 To Win $20 Dinner-Theater 
Gift Certificates In North Quincy 



Fourteen lucky couples will 
win $20 dinner-theatre gift 
certificates this month simply by 
registering—without 
obligation-at any participating 
business in North Quincy 
between now and Jan. 26. 

The gift certificate will 
include dinner for two and 
attendance at the Chateau de 
Ville, Randolph presentation of 
the Rodgers and Hammerstein 
musical, "The King and I". The 
show stars William Chapman and 
Karen Shepard. 



Names of the winners ot the 
contest, sponsored by the North 
Quincy Business and 
Professional Association, will be 
drawn Jan. 31 at 5:30 p.m. at 
Walsh's Restaurant. 

Registration coupons are 
available at the participating 
businesses. Coupons which 
appeared on page 14 in last 
week's Quincy Sun may also be 
used for registering. 

Participating businesses are: 
Doran & Horrigan Real 



Estate, Cammy's Delicatessen, 
President Real Estate, Mister 
Sub, Fashion Quality Cleaners, 
Balducci's Pizza, Curtis Market, 
Henry Thornton Real Estate, 
Topo Gigio Restaurant, Barmo 
Used Furniture, Shoe Villa. 

Quincy Savings Bank, 
Naborhood Pharmacy, Stan's 
Card and Gift Shop, Granite 
Cooperative Bank, Wheel House 
Diner, Dudley Furniture and 
Appliances, Francette's Pet 
Shop, Nesco TV, Walsh's 
Restaurant, Hussey Radio Shop 
and Hogan's Exxon. 



Atlantic Parents Conference Schedule Listed 



The Atlantic Junior High 
School guidance department 
announces the evening parent 
conference schedule for January 
at the school's guidance offices: 



Monday, Jan. 21, 6:30 - 8:30 
P.M., parents of students in: 
Grade 8, Alpha, Beta and 
Gamma Teams. Counselors: 
Stephen Del Rosso and Miss 



Laura Asci. . 

Tuesday, Jan. 22, 6:30 - 8:30 
P.M., parents of students in: 
Grade 7, Gamma Team. 
Counselor, Dana Smith. 



Sharon Streicher Sonesta Assistant Secretary 



Election of Mrs. Sharon A. 
Streicher of North Quincy as 
Assistant Secretary of Sonesta 
International Hotels Corporation 
is announced by Paul 
Sonnabend, Sonesta president. 

Mrs. Streicher, who is also 
corporate attorney, was 
formerly associated with Gadsby 
& Hannah and Berkeley 
Neighborhood Legal Assistance. 
She is a graduate of Brooklyn 
College of the City University of 
New York and the University of 
California's Hastings College of 



Law. 

She is a member of 
Massachusetts and California 



state bars and is married to Dr. 
Stanley L. Streicher. 



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WALSH'S 
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9 BILLINGS RD. NORTH QUINCY 773 5508 



Page 16 Quincy Sun Thursday, January 17, 1974 



New Quincy Savings Bank On Schedule 




AT TOPPING OFF ceremonies at New Quincy Savings Bank Building Headquarters are, from the left, 
Duncan F. McCrann, Spaulding and Slye Corporation, Real Estate Brokerage Division; Mayor Walter J. 
Hannon; Mrs. Charles A. Pearce; Ward 1 Councillor Leo J. Kelly and Charles A. Pearce, President, 
Quincy Savings Bank. 



Topping Off ceremonies were 
held at the construction site of 
the new Quincy Savings Bank 
Headquarters Building in 
downtown Quincy. 

Robert M. Lurie, Project 
Manager, Spaulding and Slye 
Corporation, reported that 
construction is moving ahead on 
schedule. The new building will 
be located at 1200 Hancock St. 
across from the MBTA station in 



Quincy Center. Ground was 
broken in August and occupancy 
is planned for early summer of 
1974. 

The foundation has been 
completed and 100 percent of 
the steel is erected. 

The new three-story, 51,000 
square foot building of exposed 
aggregate precast concrete and a 



combination of clear and dark 
solar bronze glass is designed by 
Architects Design Group, 
Cambridge. Quincy Savings Bank 
will occupy 26,000 square feet 
and Duncan F. McCrann of 
Spaulding and Slye 
Corporation's Real Estate 
Brokerage Division is presently 
responsible for the marketing of 
the additional space in the new 
bank. 






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Business News 





JOSEPH F. CAHILL 

At Old Colony 



ROGER J. MACDONALD 



Joseph Gahill Retires; 

R. Macdonald, 
R. Leavitt Appointed 



A retirement and two 
appointments at the executive 
level are announced at Old 
Colony Crushed Stone Company 
and the Old Colony 
Construction Company of 
Quincy. 

Joseph F. Cahill has retired as 
Vice President-Sales and has 
been succeeded by Roger J. 
Macdonald. 

Robert J. Leavitt has been 
appointed Assistant 
Vice-President-Sales. 

Announcement was made by 
Frank Mitchell, Assistant 
Treasurer. 

Cahill has served with the two 
firms for 47 years, joining them 
in 1926. He is a native of South 
Boston and a long time member 
of the L Street Brownies, the 
Quincy Elks, the Pere Marquette 
Council, South Boston Knights 
of Columbus, the One Hundred 
Club and the Massachusetts 
Highway Association. He is a 
past secretary-treasurer of the 
Massachusetts Crushed Stone 
Association. 

He lives at 55 Hilma St., 
Quincy, with his wife, Louise. 
They have three children, Mary 
Lou, who is employed in the 
Quincy tax collector's office; 



Francis, a teacher at Boston 
Latin School and Arthur, a 
teacher at Wakefield High 
School. 

Friends will honor Cahill at a 
testimonial dinner Jan. 18 at 
The Lantana, Randolph. 

Macdonald has had extensive 
experience in the construction 
industry. He served 14 years as a 
vice-president with the 
Campanella Corp. of Rhode 
Island and served as a member of 
the Joint Technical Committee 
of the National Asphalt Paving 
Association and National 
Crushed Stone Association. 

He lives with his wife and five 
children at 2 Meadowbrook Rd, 
Raynham. 

Leavitt, employed with the 
Old Colony firms since 1957, is 
a Bentley graduate and a 
member of Plymouth County 
Highway Association, 
Norfolk-Bristol Highway 
Association, Massachusetts 
Highway Association and the 
Norwell VFW Post. 

He lives at 79 Brantwood Rd, 
Norwell with his wife. Lee, and 
their four sons, Robert Jr., 
Michael, Christopher and 
Timothy. 



Mass. Electric To Refund 
$5.5 Million To Customers 



Massachusetts Electric 
Company will begin refunding 
about $5.5 million to customers 
over the next 10 months. 

The refund will appear as a 
credit on 1974 bills. It 
represents the difference 
between what was collected by 
the company subject to refund 
and the final settlement, 
approved by the Federal Power 



THE PRICE 
IS UP ON 

SCRAP 

Copper, Brass, Cast Iron 
and Steel 

POM 

The Name in Scrap 

on The South Shore 

175 Intervale St., Quincy 

Formerly Haynti Scrap Yard 

472-9251 



Commission, on the rate for 
wholesale electricity sold by 
New England Power Company 
to Massachusetts Electric. 

The refund will amount to 
about six-tenths of a mill per 
kilowatt hour and will appear as 
a credit on customers' bills 
effective Jan. 7. 

Also, as of Jan. 1, 
Massachusetts Electric began 
billing a new purchased power 
cost adjustment to offset higher 
wholesale electric rates 
requested by New England 
Power. This adjustment, which 
adds about nine-tenths of a mill 
per kilowatt hour to customers' 
bills, is also subject to refund 



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Thursday, January 17, 1974 Quincy Sun Page 17 




LOUIS TOZZI catches the class' attention with a sports problem and then teaches them mathematics by 
way of it at Central Junior High School. Tozzi came by the idea naturally. He's also track and cross 
country coach at North Quincy High School. 

Lou Tozzi, Teacher-Coach: 

He Uses Sports Facts 
To Make Math Interesting 



By TOM HENSHAW 

"Rocket Richard scored a 
total of 626 goals, including 
playoff games, in his brilliant 
career in the NHL with the 
Canadiens. Find half of this 
total." 

Sports page item? No. 
Education page. 

It's Louis Tozzi's way of 
teaching mathematics to 
sports-minded youngsters at 
Central Junior High School who 
couldn't care less about the 
numbers themselves. 

The Tozzi method has proven 
so popular and successful that he 
is having his material published 
in booklet form as an aid for 
other teachers with motivational 
problems in the classroom. 

The idea came about three 
years ago to Tozzi, 27, who is 
cross country and track coach at 
North Quincy High School. 

"I had a couple of boys in my 
seventh grade class at Central 
who weren't doing the work 
required in order to pass the 
course." says Tozzi. 

"One day when I noticed one 
of the boys with a hockey 
magazine in class I decided to 
try to do something about it. 

"I asked the boy if he'd like 
to try to learn some of his 
arithmetic from the magazine 
and he said yes. 

"Being a sports fan and coach 
I was interested in the facts and 
figures of sports statistics and 
records myself so the homework 
for me that night was easy. 

"I simply devised some 
problems concerning the same 



topics we were discussing in class 
at the time and gave them to the 
boy the next day. 

"Well, when the bookwork 
and worksheet type drill he had 
been doing was replaced by 
problems containing real-life 
players, teams and statistics he 
finally became interested in 
mathematics." 

If it worked with one 
youngster, Tozzi reasoned, 
might it not work with others. 

He sat down and devised 
programs that united 
mathematics instruction with 
the four most popular 
sports—hockey, basketball, 
football, and baseball. 

At first, the teaching aides 
were such local heroes as Bobby 
Orr, Dave Cowens, Jim Plunkett 
and Carl Yastrzemski but later 
he branched out into other 
players and teams. 

"I let the students choose 
from any of the four major 
sports," says Tozzi. "All four 
have many varied topics covered, 
all of which I try to correspond 
to the daily classwork. 

"For example, suppose we are 
having a lesson on division of 
whole numbers by a one digit 
divisor. The problems go like 
this: 

"Only 9009 watched three 
exhibition games between the 
WHA Los Angeles and New 
York teams. What was the 
average attendance per contest? 

"Shots on net from a recent 
season: Boston 2668, Minnesota 
2576, California 2074. Can you 
determine one half of the 
Bruins' total?" 



Each student keeps a folder 
for his sports papers and, after 
Tozzi checks them, they are 
returned to the student and the 
number recorded at the end of 
the term for credit. 

"A few of the students had 40 
or more papers done the first 
term this year," says Tozzi, "and 
I found that of the 5 1 boys 1 
have for math this year, 42 are 
doing work in the program. 

"Obviously, we don't expect 
all of the boys to be interested 
in sports and the others are, of 
course, not penalized or lose 
credit in any way." 

The Tozzi program is to be 
published soon in four booklets, 
one for each sport, each 
containing 35 different 
arithmetic topics and at least 
five problems on each page. 

Also each will contain an 
index of all the teams and 
players named in the booklet 
(about 300 in each), a table of 
contents and an answer key. 

"My general philosophy is 
that if the material can be 
presented in a relevant fashion 
to the students they will benefit 
greatly from the work," says 
Tozzi. "Why? Because it was 
interesting. 

"This is one of the keys to 
working with 12 or 13 year 
olders since they become bored 
or turned off very easily." 

Tozzi, a graduate of Quincy 
High School who lives with his 
wife in West Roxbury, currently 
is studying for a masters degree 
at Bridgewater State College. He 
plans eventually to work with 
retarded children. 



QYHA Dance Set For Feb. 8 



The Quincy Youth Hockey 
Association will hold a dance 
Feb. 8 in St. Mary's parish hall, 
Crescent St., West Quincy from 
9 p.m. to 1 a.m. 

Music will be by the 
Shannonaires. Tickets will be 
sold first to Quincy Youth 
Hockey parents and then go on 
public sale. There is only a 
limited number of tickets. 

They can be obtained from 
Dot Schofield, 328-5361; Dan 
Gorman, 773-7228; Jim and 
Sharon Deitsch, 773-0108; Tom 
and Maureen Bamberry, 
471-1134; John Murphy, 
328-4986; Jack and Barbara 
Campbell, 773-4429; Tom and 
Mary Heffernan, 472-5976; Paul 
and Jane McDermott, 773-3076; 



Katy and Charlie Kane, 
47 2-4110; Dick Storella, 
471-8910; Art and Joan 
Giordarni, 479-1131, and Bob 
and Audrey Hayes, 472-3243. 



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Cobban First Half 
Champs Of 

Koch Club Seniors 



Sarale Cobban's team is the 
first half champion of the Koch 
Club Seniors Bowling League. 

Other members of the team 
are Margaret Shea, Lorraine 
Russell and Judith Cullen. 

The final first half standings: 
Cobban, 72-24; Ruane, 71-25; 
Flynn, 71-25; P. Nestor, 66-30; 
Hayes, 63-33; Fatseas, 62-34; 
McGuire, 56-40; Norton, 50-46; 
Alibrandi, 50-46; Puleo, 48-48; 
White, 48-48; Connors, 48-48; 
Little, 47-49; Batts, 47-49; 
Bursey, 46-50; Debbie Panto, 
46-50; M. Nestor, 45-51; Hicks, 
44-52; Troy, 40-56; Lawlor, 
38-58; Boyle, 38-58; Joyce, 



37-59; Donna Panto, 34-62; 
Rideout, 33-63; Alessi, 26-70; 
Widman, 22-74. 

Adrienne White has high 
average of 94.7, followed by 
Jackie Little, 93.5; Debbie 
Bursey, 93.2; Marie Nestor, 
90.3; Joanne Flynn, 89.8; Ann 
Alibrandi, 89.2; Helena Lawlor, 
89.1; Patty Nestor, 89.0; Sarale 
Cobban, 88.9, and Tracey 
Norton, 88.8 

White has high team three of 
1 102, Ruane high team single of 
396, Jackie Little high individual 
three of 332 and also high 
individual single of 127. 



Paul Harvey YMCA 
Men, Boys Director 



The Quincy YMCA announces 
the promotion of Paul S. Harvey 
of Milton as Men and Boys 
Director. 

Harvey has been with the 
Quincy YMCA since 1966, 
serving in the capacity of Youth 
Director. His new position gives 
him total responsibility of all 
social and physical programs 
related to men and boys. 

He is a graduate of Melrose 
High School and Eastern 
Nazarene College and received 



his professional certification 
from the National YMCA in 
1970. 

Assisting Harvey will be 
William V. Johnson of East 
Braintree and James E. Rendle 
of Quincy. Johnson is a graduate 
of Barrington College with a 
major in Physical Education and 
Rendle is a graduate of the 
University of Massachusetts, also 
with a major in Physical 
Education. 




The game where 

John Havlicek 

faked out eight people. 

We wanted John Havlicek to 
take a new position -that of 
spokesman for Dial Finance. 
Of course we know John 
wouldn't consent until he was 
convinced he could con 
fidently lay his reputation on 
the lino in endorsing Dial. 

\^f ? 7M To convince John that Dial 

^Hf was a different kind of finance 

company, we asked him to do 
» some fancy faking. He was to 
call eight separate Dial offices. 
. pretending to be someone in- 
terested in a loan. The hitch'.' 
Not one of the Dial offices was tipped off about the fact that 
John Havlicek would be calling. Here, in John's words, is 
what happened: 

"After my first call. I began seeing what Dial meant when 
they said theirs was a company with different dimension. 
Both the phone and my questions were answered promptly 
. . .and courteously. 

"As I kept making more calls. 1 was more and more 
amazed by the refreshing directness and professionalism of 
the Dial people fielding my questions. But the most amazing 
thing to me was this. After making eight calls, never once 
was I given a sales pitch or pressured or even asked my 
name! The Dial people simply gave me the hard facts with- 
out giving me a hard time. 

"Probably the most surprising moment of all was on my 
fifth call. 1 told the Dial person that I had several monthly 
bills from several different sources and I was interested in a 
consolidation loan. I faked some monthly payment figures. 
Then he did some figuring of his own and actually advised 
me not to take out a consolidation loan, because the one 
monthly payment I would make to Dial wouldn't substan- 
tially reduce the sum of the monthly payments I was now 
making! Imagine that! A finance company advising me 
dfitiinsl a loan. Although I had loaded the deck and faked the 
figures so that I had created a rare case, it was still nice to 
know that Dial is a company that acts in your interests... 
and not for its own." 

The kind of service and consideration John Havlicek 
received from Dial isn't reserved just for basketball players. 
It's reserved for everybody . . . and has been since 1897. So 
next time you're thinking of borrowing, think of Dial 
Finance. You see. we don't want you to like us just for 
our money. 

Visit Dial's Randolph office at 322 N. Main Street, 
Femandes Shopping Center, phone 963-0400 or the Brock- 
ton office at 726 Crescent Street, Brockton East Shopping 
Plaza, phone 583-3420. Other Dial offices: 3 downtown, 
Billerica. I ynn. Maiden, Walpole. 



Page 18 Quincy Sun Thursday, January 17, 1974 



Hayes Paces Blues 
To 4-3 Victory 



Bob Hayes scored two goals 
and assisted on another Sunday 
in leading the Blue team to a 4-3 
victory over the Green team in 
Executive Hockey League 
action. 

Al McKay had a single goal 
and assisted on a pair as the 
Blues maintained their 
three-point lead over the Red 
team. 

But it remained for Bob Craig 
to fire the winning goal. 

Defenseman Joe Chase tallied 
twice unassisted for the Green 
team and assisted on a goal by 
Chet Brunstron. 

Meanwhile, the Red team 
trounced the Gold team, 4-1, as 
Charlie Duffy scored two goals 
and Gary DeCoste and Mike 
Collins got one apiece. 

Ralph Freeman, Jack Hurley, 
Jim Deitsch, Dick Reinhardt and 
Kenny Halloran had assists. 

Marty Tolson got the lone 
Gold goal, assisted by Paul 
STANDINGS 

W L T Pts. For Agst 
Blue 10 4 3 23 63 49 
Red 8 5 4 20 59 56 
Gold 7 7 3 17 63 63 
Green 4 13 8 49 66 



LEADING SCORERS 
G A Pts 

Marty Tolson, 

Gold 15 11 26 

Al McKay, 

Blue 14 10 24 

Ken Halloran, 

Red 13 10 23 

Kevin White, 

Blue 12 11 23 

Jack Hurley, 

Red 7 13 20 

Tom Roberts, 

Gold 12 8 20 



Buckie Zan- 

ardelli, 

Green 10 9 19 
Bob Hayes, 

Blue 7 10 17 

Charlie Duffy, 

Red 7 9 16 

Ralph Freeman, 

Red 9 7 16 

Harry Messina, 

Blue 10 6 16 

Joe Ryan, 

Gold 8 8 16 

Leading goalie: Pat Quigg, Blue, 
2.8 goals against average. 



A-N, Central Win 



In Quincy Junior High League 
basketball games last week 
Central won two of three games 
from Sterling. 

Central's ninth graders won, 
37-24, sparked by Jimmy 
Smith's 12 points. Kevin 
O'Malley and Brian Djerf had 
eight points each for the winners 
and Marty Levenson had seven. 
Mike Murphy had 10 for Sterling 
and Scott Brodie had four. 

Sterling eighth grade won, 
25-22, as John Sylva scored 
eight, Mike Duggan seven and 
Jimmy Maze four for Sterling. 
Steve Germain scored 10 and 
Wink Phelan eight for Central. 
Central moved to within a point 
with less than a minute to play. 
Central's seventh grade won, 
14-5. Tommy Bellotti scored 



four points, Robby Nolan six 
and Mark Cicerone two for 
Central, while Mom MacKay and 
George Cerelli had two each for 
Sterling. 

Atlantic-North swept all three 
games from Broad Meadows. 

In ninth grade action A-N 
romped, 35-17, as John White 
scored 10 points and Keith 
Lindberg eight for the winners. 
A-N won the eighth grade 
game easily, 32-12, sparked by 
Joe Deane's 14 points. Kevin 
Connors had six for Broad 
Meadows. 

A-N also romped, 27-12, as 
Kevin Cobban scored eight 
points. 

The games scheduled for last 
Thursday were postponed by 
bad weather. 



St. Ann's Pee Wee All Stars 
Edge Winthrop, 3-2 



The St. Ann's Hockey League 
Pee Wee All-stars defeated 
Winthrop, 3-2, as Steve Olson 
scored twice and Chris Clark 
once. 

Assisting were Clark, Frank 



LaPierre, Kevin Kelly and Fred 
Caldwell. 

Brian Condon and Brian 
O'Hanley shared the goalie 
duties for the St. Ann's team. 



Midget House 



Fire Dept., Suburban, Cox 
Hold 1, 2, 3, Spots 



Cox Rambler moved into 
third place within striking 
distance of the top spot in the 
Midget House League last week 
with twin victories over the Fire 
Department and Rich's South 
Shore Express. 

Dave Perdios had two goals in 
a 6-2 decision over the Fire 
Department. Wally Glendy, Ed 
Martin, Gerry McGrath and Dan 
Perdios had the other goals with 
Rick Butt and Rick Bowe 
getting two assists and Dan 
Perdios and Billy Pitts one each. 

Game pucks went to Goalie 
Rick Buccheri and Dave Perdios. 

Charlie McLean and Bob 
Crews each had a goal and an 
assist for the Fire Department. 

Gerry McGrath had two goals 
and two assists for Cox in a 6-4 
win over Rich's. Ron Hennessey, 
Dave Perdios, Frank Shea and 
Bowe had the other scores with 
assists going to Martin, Shea, 

• Squirt House 



Bowe and the Perdios boys. 

Tony Alessi had all four goals 
for Rich's. Tom Ward assisted on 
three of them and Bob Carmody 
also had an assist. 

Gerry McGrath won the game 
puck. 

The Fire Department, which 
is leading the league by a point 
over Suburban Disposal, 
managed to retain the spot with 
a 4-1 win over Tiffany Realty as 
Mike Doherty got a pair of 
scores and Kevin Pitts and Paul 
Morris got one each. 

Kurt Dunphy had three 
assists, Pitts two and Doherty 
one. 

John Storer had the lone 
Tiffany goal, assisted by Mark 
Burke. 

Suburban Disposal had a 
tough week, bowing to Tiffany, 
5-3, and gaining a 2-2 tie with 
the Police Boys Club. 

Frank Penzo and Kevin 
O'Neil, assisted by Dan Cetlin 



and Scott Mitchell, scored for 
Suburban against the Police 
while Joe Carty and Mark Walsh 
got the goals and Greg Dillon an 
assist for the Police. 

John Whalen, John Storer, 
Mark Burke, Fred Harland and 
Ed Gallagher got Tiffany's goals 
with assists credited to Tom 
Morris [2], John Whalen, 
Gallagher, Harold Whalen and 
Mark Fontaine. 

Bob Ahem had two goals for 
Suburban, Tom Parke one, with 
assists by Joe O'Keefe, Dan 
Cetlin and Kevin O'Neil. 

Dan Barry's three goal hat 
trick paced the Police Boys Club 
to a 6-1 victory over Rich's. 

Jerry Cronin, Mike Griffin 
and Bob Page also had goals with 
assists to Joe Carty [2], Mark 
Walsh, Page and Griffin. 

Tony Alessi found the net for 
Rich's, assisted by Bob 
Carmody. 



DD's, Back, Maher, Nardone Win 



In the Squirt House League, 
Dee Dee's 'edged Mclnnis 
Contractor, 3-2. 

Richie Durham, Bobby 
Bolster and Tom Richards 
scored for the winners with Tom 
Smith having an assist. For 
Mclnnis Paul Reinhardt and 
Mitch Mclnnis scored and Joe 
Livingstone had an assist. 



Howard Back Realty blanked 
Hannon Tire, 2-0, on goals by 
Greg Freeman and Steve Healy. 
Assists went to Healy, Steve 
DeLuca, Thomas O'Connor and 
Greg Freeman. 

Maher Plumbing nipped Kyes 
Meat Supply, 3-2, as Kevin 
McSweeney scored all the Maher 
goals. Ed Doherty had two 
assists. For Kyes Steve Walsh 



and Mike Marshall scored and 
Walsh had an assist. 

Nardone Aluminum belted 
McCann Steel, 8-0, as Steve 
Burns had four goals, John 
Lyons and Mike Cullen two 
each. Al Divencentis had three 
assists, John Lyons two, Brian 
Donovan and John Baylis one 
each. 



Wilson Hat Trick Paces Bantam B's, 9-0 



Defenseman Mike Wilson had 
the hat trick Saturday in leading 
the Quincy Bantam "B" team to 
a 9-0 demolition of .Hingham in 
a Bay Colony Hockey 
Association game. He also had 
an assist. 

Goalies Daryl DeCristofaro 
and Kevin Cotter combined their 
talents for the second straight 
Quincy shutout. 

John Fitzgerald had two goals 



and an assist, Rick Carnali had a 
pair of goals, Dave Peters and 
Dave Lewis had a goal and an 
assist each, and John Norton, 
Mark Paolucci and John 
Andrews had two assists. 

Jimmy Moore and Mike Marks 
got an assist apiece. 

Peters and Mark Kelly did 
most of the scoring in the 
Quincy team's 15-0 decision 
over Duxbury. Kelly had three 



goals and two assists, Peters two 
goals and four assists. 

Other scorers were Paul 
Higgins, two goals; Don Perdios, 
two goals and an assist; Paolucci, 
Andrews and Wilson, a goal and 
two assists; Marks, three assists; 
Fitzgerald and Lewis, a goal and 
an assist; Carnali, a goal; and 
Norton and John Fitzpatrick, an 
assist apiece. 



Deitsch's Hat Trick Powers B's To 14th 



Powered by Bill Deitsch's hat 
trick the Quincy Pee Wee "B" 
team remained undefeated in 1 5 
games Sunday with an 11-2 
victory over Duxbury in a Bay 
Colony Hockey Association 
game. 



Single goals were scored by 
Dan Sullivan, Dan Cronin, Jeff 
Giordani, Ken Halloran, Ken 
Micelli, Ed Marella, John 
Jackson and John Keaney. 

Mark Rooney had three 



assists; Cronin, Halloran and 
Keaney two each; and Deitsch, 
Sullivan, Giordani, and Micelli 
one apiece. 

The Pee Wee B's league record 
is now 14 wins and a tie. 



t ooooooo oooooooooo 



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1972 Dodge Monaco, 4-Dr. Hdtp. 

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1970 Toyota Crown $1,795 



1969 Chevelle 4-door, 6 cylinder, 

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1969 Chevelle, 4-door $1,295 

1968 Buick Skylark $1,595 

1967 F-85, 6 cylinder $ 895 



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Some dangers around the house 
merely change appearance by the 
season. For example the 
snowblower - winter's cousin to 
summer's potentially hazardous 
power lawn mower. 

The motorized snowblower 
breaks up snow and tosses it to 
the side. There's no doubt that it 
has safety advantages - such as 
reducing the exertion of shoveling 
snow [which can result in heart 
attack], and making walks less 
slippery. But it has, also, built-in 
hazards similar to those of the 
power lawnmower. 

The snowblower has blades or 
augers that can slice off parts of 
the human anatomy, and a 
number of users have had fingers 
mangled or amputated while using 
their hands to unclog a 
snowblower when the motor was 



running. It's imperative to shut 
off the blower's motor and wait 
for the blades to stop revolving 
before putting your hands near 
the discharge area. In general, say 
safety engineers, you should treat 
snowblowers with the same 
caution as you do power lawn 
mowers. 

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Thurtdiy.Juiuuy 17, 1974 Quincy Sun Page 19 



• Bantam House 

Blackwood Moves 
Into Top Spot 



Larry Burak's two goals lifted 
Blackwood Pharmacy into a 5-4 
victory over Trucks of Quincy in 
the battle for first place in the 
Bantam House League. The two 
teams were tied for the top spot. 

Rich Fidler had a goal and 
two assists, Paul MacDonald and 
Tim MacLean had a goal and an 
assist apiece and Brian Simmons 
and Dana Chiavaroli also had 
assists. 

Paul O'Brien was a two goal 
scorer for Trucks and Paul K. 
Barry had a goal and an assist. 
Danny Higgins had the other 
goal with assists credited to Pete 
Cassidy, Billy Doherty and Bud 
Currier. 

South Shore TV and Baskin 
Robbins battled to a 3-3 tie with 
Dave O'Brien getting two goals 
and an assist and Mike Marella a 
goal and two assists for Baskin. 
Al Whitman also had an assist. 

Jack Campbell, Paul 
Lindenfeltzer and John Marsters 
got the goals. for South Shore 
TV with assists to Mike 
Bondarick and Lindenfeltzer. 

Jimmy Deitsch stood out in 
the goal as Burgin Platner 
whipped Doran and Horrigan, 
5-2. 

Bobby Panico and Pete Plante 
had a pair of goals each and Pat 
Bamberry had one for Burgin. 
Kevin Bythrow and Bamberry 



drew assists. 

Bill Morrison and Mike Welch 
scored for Doran, assisted by 
Sean Jago and Bud Mossesso. 

Johnson Motor Parts moved 
back into the thick of the 
pennant fight with a 7-2 win 
over Bersani Brothers as Tommy 
Koelsch had the hat trick plus an 
assist. 

Mark Ricciardi had a goal and 
two assists, Ronan Storer and 
John Fair a goal and an assist, 
Mark Landry a goal and Mike 
Colon, Jay Daly and Mike 
Collins assists. 

Bersani's goals came off the 
sticks of Paul Cooney and Jeff 
Gavin with assists by Kurt 
O'Sullivan, Bud Kelly and Gavin. 

The Quincy Sun, last year's 
defending champions, rose up to 
upset Noonan Press, 8-2, with 
Dave Palazza's two goals and an 
assist showing the way. 

The other goals were scored 
by Gary Trenholm, Bobby 
Kenney, Steve Canavan, Mike 
Boyle, Bob Burns and Bill 
Doherty. 

Assists went to Kevin Whelan 
and Boyle, two each, and Bob 
Flibotte, Mike Pitts, Ed Murphy 
and Canavan. 

Ken Kustka and Paul 
Vallantine scored for Noonan, 
assisted by John Picard and Tom 
Pistorino. 



Harte, Burm, Hurley 
Hat Tricks Spark Mite B's 



Joe Harte, John Burm and 
Chris Hurley all had hat tricks as 
the Quincy Mite "B" team 
walloped Bridgewater, 15-2, in a 
Bay Colony Hockey Association 
game. 

Kevin White and Kevin 
Greene had two goals apiece and 
Billy Campbell and Paul Marshall 
had one each. 

Assists were credited to Scott 
Messina [5], Harte [3], Greene 
[21, Chuck Duffy [2], Paul 
Marshall [2] Burm, Jack Gabriel 



and Dickie Tapper. 

Paul Ryan and Tim O'Connell 
starred in goal. 

The Mite B's also beat 
Brockton, 8-1, with White and 
Marshall getting two goals each. 

Hurley, Chris Harrington, 
Harte and Burm had the other 
goals. 

Dennis Cronin, Hurley and 
Harrington had two assists each 
while White, Burm, Marshall, 
Gabriel, Messina and Dave 
Edgren had singles. 



Squirt A's Wallop Weymouth 



The Squirt A team walloped 
Weymouth, 10-3, sparked by 
Chuckie Marshall's four goals. 

Bobby Beniers had two, Mike 
Hussey, Joey Rathgeb, Mark 



Boussy and Mike Doherty one 
each, while Boussy, Doherty and 
Neil Shea had three assists 
apiece, Marshall two, Hussey, 
Kevin Chase, Kevin Craig, Karl 
Nord and Mike Quigg one each. 




A 



SCORE FOR QUINCY - Brian Watts of Quincy, peels away from the Revere goalie after scoring on a 
breakaway backhander. Action took place when the Quincy Youth Hockey Bantam "A" team traveled 
to Danvers for a weekend exhibition game against Revere. Revere won 2-1. 

[Ed Cotter Photo] 

• Pee Wee House 

Davis, Wollaston, Harold, 
Morrisette In Victories 



Brian Ofria scored two goals 
as Davis Insurance romped to a 
6-1 victory over United 
Commercial Travelers to run its 
Pee Wee League-leading record 
to eight wins in nine games. 

Bill Joyce, John Lyons, 
Richie Isaac and John Callahan 
got the other scores as Davis 
extended its winning streak to 
six straight games. 

Assists went to Lyons [3], 
Callahan, Ofria and Jeff 
Gosselin. 

Dickie Reinhardt scored the 
only goal for UCT, assisted by 



Paul Reardon and Bob Collins. 

Harold Club walloped 
Keohanes, 7-4, as Bob Thomas 
and Dana Cellini had two goals 
each and Bobby Palermo, Mike 
Brewster and Bob Currier had 
one each. Currier and Cellini had 
assists. 

Bernie Van Tassell had a goal 
and two assists for Keohanes. 
John Furey and Tim Ricciardi 
each had a goal and an assist, 
Rick Ryan a goal and John 
Newcomb an assist. 

Kevin Gallo tallied twice, each 
time assisted by John Coleman, 
and it was all the Wollaston 



Theater needed in a 2-1 win over 
the Quincy Teachers. 

Kevin Cobban got the lone 
goal for the Teachers, assisted by 
Tommy Mullen and Mike Penzo. 

Jay Collins' two goals 
provided the margin in 
Morrisette's 3-2, sqeaker over 
Team Quincy. 

Mike Edwards also scored for 
Morrisette with assists by Jeff 
Taylor, Billy Allen and Steve 
Whittemore. 

Freddie Palmer had both goals 
for Team Quincy, assisted on 
one of them by Chris Erickson. 



Midget B's Roll To 3 Victories 



The Midget B team kept 
rolling along with three more 
wins. 

The team nipped Braintree, 
4-3, with Jackie Powers scoring 
twice, Steve Neville and Bud 
Conally one each. Neville, 
Powers and Joe McConville had 
assists. 

The club rolled over 



Holbrook, 14-3, with Powers 
and Rick Lucier having three 
goals apiece and Joe Pistorino 
two. The other goals vere scored 
by Neville, Larry Curtis, Mike 
Conti, Dennis Bertoni, Jeff 
Murphy and Mike Doherty. 
Assists went to Pat McAuliffe 
with three, Neville and Bertoni 
with two each, Murphy and 



Lucier. 

In a 9-0 breeze over West 
Bridgewater, Pistorino and 
Powers scored twice each, Conti, 
Murphy, Connally, Bertoni and 
Lucier once each. Assists went 
to Pistorino with two, Conti, 
Bertoni, Powers and Bob 
Fitzpatrick one each. 




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Page 20 Quincy Sun Thursday, January 17, 1974 



• Basketball 

Quincy Meets Maiden At Garden, 
Raiders Invade Chelsea Friday 



The Quincy High basketball 
team, making a determined bid 
for the Greater Boston League 
championship in its final year in 
the league, Friday faces Maiden 
in a 5:30 p.m. game at Boston 
Garden in a preliminary to the 
Celtics-Atlanta Hawks game. 

Last Tuesday the Presidents, 
4-1 in the league and tied with 
Everett for first place, and 6-2 
overall, played at Everett to 
dissolve the tie. The game had 
been scheduled last Friday but 
was postponed due to the 
hazardous driving conditions. 
Next Tuesday Quincy plays at 
Medford. 

Meanwhile, North Quincy, 
with a 3-2 league mark and 4-4 
overall, Tuesday played last 
Friday's postponed game at. 
home against Medford, will play 
at Chelsea Friday and host 



Everett In a big one next 
Tuesday. 

Earlier in the week Quincy 
played fine defense but had a 
cold shooting night and it cost 
the Presidents their first league 
loss, 43-38, at Somerville. 

Despite only a 26 percent 
shooting night, Quincy held a 
30-25 lead going into the final 
period but here Somerville took 
advantage of the off-night and 
outscored Quincy, 18-8. 

"Our defense has been strong 
in every game and until this 
game our shooting had been 
good," Quincy Coach Joe 
Amorosino said. "Mark Dwyer 
and Fred Donahue played well." 
Tom McKinnon led the 
scorers with 10 points and was 
the only President to hit double 
figures. 

North Q/iincy built up a 



1 3-point halftime lead and it was 
just as well because the Raiders 
had to fight off a determined 
Revere comeback to pull out a 

69-63 win. 

"We were ahead all the way 
but they made a good run at us 
in the final period," Coach Bob 
Nolan said. North, ahead, 36-23, 
at the half and 50-37 after three 
periods, was outscored, 26-19, in 
the last eight minutes. 

"I was especially pleased with 
the play of Tim Clifford, who 
controlled both boards, and 
sophomore Cooper Jordan, who 
sank a couple of clutch baskets 
in the second period," Nolan 
continued. "We played good 
defense again but I think we 
were a bit flat after the big game 
with Quincy." 

Clifford had 19 points, Jed 
Phelan scored 18, Steve Miller 
16 and John Fly nn 10. 



Nestor Team Alley Kats Midway Winners 



Milan Nestor's team won the 
first half in the Alley Kats 
Bowling League with a 76-44 
record. 

Other members of the team 
are Barbara Neil, Jane Wilson, 
Doris Donnelly, and Mary 
Younie. 

Roseanna Donahue leads the 
league with a 104.4 average. 



Jane Wilson has the most strikes 
and Marie Ford has most spares. 

The standings: M. Nestor, 
76-44; P. Nestor, 72-48; 
DeGreco, 65-56; Donahue, 
52-68; Ford, 50-70; and 
Hamblin, 46-74. 

The Top 10 includes 
Roseanna Donahue, 104.4; Pat 
Nestor, 102.4; Milan Nestor, 



101.6; Marie Ford, 99.0; Mady 
DelGreco, 96.1; Joan Hamblin, 
95.2; Mai Nestor, 95.1; Jean 
Doherty, 93.8; Rita Giunta, 93.4 
and Janice Hutchins, 93.3. 

Pat Nestor's team has high 
three of 1450, Joan Hamblin's 
team high single of 523, Milan 
Nestor high individual three of 
355 and Pat Nestor high 
individual single of 142. 




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•Hockey 

Quincy Faces North 

Friday In Quest 
For Tourney Berth 



The Quincy High hockey 
team will continue its drive 
toward a state tourney berth 
Friday night when it faces rival 
North Quincy in a 9 p.m. 
Greater Boston League game at 
Boston Arena. 

The Presidents will face 
Everett next Wednesday at 5 

p.m. 

Meanwhile, North Quincy, 
having a disappointing season, 
will clash with Chelsea Monday 
at 9 after its second meeting of 
the year with Quincy. The 
Raiders bowed to Quincy, 7-3, 
in their first meeting. 

Quincy's high scorers, junior 
Ted Wiedemann and sophomore 
Frank Guest, collaborated for 
one of the season's most 
important goals last Monday to 
give the Presidents a 2-2 tie with 
Medford. In trying to qualify for 
the tourney, a tie counts as a 
win so the big goal with just 39 
seconds left in the pme kept 
Quincy's hopes alive. 

Dave DiBona put Quincy 
ahead early in the game with Al 
Lancione assisting but Medford 
then scored twice late in the first 
period to take the lead. There 
was no more scoring until those 
final 39 seconds when Guest 
passed to Wiedemann, who 
broke away for the goal. 

The tie gave Bob Sylvia's 
Quincy club a 6-3-1 record. 

Ron Erikson's luckless North 
skaters suffered a heartbreaking 
2-1 loss to undefeated league 
leader Maiden when two Raider 
goals were disallowed. 

North had a goal nullified in 
the opening period and another, 
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in the final period. 

Maiden, 9-0-1 on the season, 
scored in each of the first two 
periods and Rob Henderson 
scored North's lone goal with 
Mike McLean assisting in the 
finale. 

"This was one of our better 
performances and it was a shame 
the boys couldn't have pulled 
off the upset," said the 
disappointed Erikson, whose 
team's record dropped to 2-6-1. 

Last Friday Quincy 
rebounded after losing successive 
games to Maiden and Somerville 
to blank Revere, 2-0, as goalie 
Glen Prescott, who had turned 
in a brilliant performance against 
Somerville despite^ the loss, had 
another outstanding night. 

North Quincy lost to second 
place Somerville for the second 
time, 6-3, as Somerville 
continued to have its finest 
season with only one loss. 

Jim Mullaney scored for the 
Raiders in the opening period 
with Mike McLean and Robbie 
Henderson assisting and North 
trailed only 2-1 after the period. 

Somerville widened its lead to 
5-1 before Andy Colleran scored 
with Brian Maclsaac and Mark 
Hurley assisting and Maclsaac 
converted passes from Hurley 
and Paul O'Donnell to score the 
final goal. 

"Despite the loss, I was 
pleased with the boys' effort as 
they gave me 100 percent and 
did all I asked of them," Erikson 
said. "We just lost to a better 
team." Ron pointed to the 
Raiders' lack of scoring, as they 
had scored only 21 goals in eight 
games. 

MIDGET A'S BOW, 5-4 

The Midget A team lost a 5-4 
decision to Hingham. Walter 
Pimental scored all the Quincy 
goals. Larry Curtis, Mike 
McAuley and John Erickson 
each had two assists. 




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Thursday, January 17, 1974 Quincy Sun Page 21 



Fathers Club Banquet Saturday 



Gayton Salvucci, an all-time 
backfield great at Quincy High 
and American International 
College, later head coach of 
football at AIC and currently 
backfield coach at Holy Cross, 
will be the principal speaker at 
Saturday night's 17th annual 
Quincy High School Fathers 
Club football awards banquet. 

The event gets underway at 
6:30 in the Voc-Tech cafeteria. 

Among the many awards to 
be presented are the Granville 
Award for the outstanding 
player in the Quincy-North 
game, Moscardelli Award for 
best offensive back, Underwood 
Award for best offensive 



lineman, Primivera Award for 
best defensive back, Presidents 
Award for best defensive 
lineman, Munroe MacLean 
Award for most valuable player, 
and Grasso Award for unsung 
hero. 

Invited guests will include 
Mayor Walter Hannon, School 
Supt. Dr. Lawrence Creedon, 
Quincy High Principal Lloyd 
Creighton, Voc-Tech Principal 
Lawrence Babin, Coordinator of 
Athletics Carl Leone, Head 
Coach Hank Conroy and his 
assistants, Art Mosher, Dave 
Burke, John Bogan and Mark 
Conroy. 

James Page is chairman of the 
Banquet committee, assisted by 



Irene King, Betty Russo, Olga 
Maggiani, Frank Osborne and 
Victor Craig, 

Tony Malvesti, outgoing 
president, will be the 
toastmaster. 

The newly elected officers are 
President Harold P. Little, Vice 
President Richard Hawking, 
Treasurer Frank Osborne and 
Secretary Page. 

The Fathers Club publicly 
thanks the Quincy merchants, 
the Quincy Sun, Supt. of 
Schools Creedon, Leone, the 
high school cheerleaders, parents 
of the players and all others who 
helped in any way to make the 
1973 season successful. 




Central Junior Students 
Present 'The Crucible 9 



Central Junior High School 
Students presented Arthur 
Miller's "The Crucible" Tuesday 
evening in the school's learning 
center. 

"The Crucible" is based on 
the Salem witchcraft trials of 
1692. 

The cast included: 

Dana Neitlich, Wayne 
Gardiner, Alicia Johnson, 



Geoffrey Chamberlain, Doron 
Ezickson, Warren Goldberg, 
Matthew Warner, Patrick 
Shanahan, Alan Doyle. 

Deborah Jacobs, Thomas 
McKillop, Sabrina Ezickson, 
Terry Hannon, Patty Maddalena, 
Patricia Mullin, Donna Milgram, 
Kathy Walsh, Michael Maginnis, 
Fred Shepherd, James Ladas, Al 
Johnson. 



Hutchinson Cuts Brett Lead 



QCA Sponsors Babysitting Courses 



The Rep. Joseph E. Brett 
Club's lead was cut to one point 
in the Quincy Bowling Little 
Loop when it lost 3-1 to 
Hutchinson Oil and runnerup 
Dick Morrissey Club took three 
points from Hennessy. 

Montclair Men's Club, a 3-1 
winner over Elks, and Granite 
Lodge, 3-1 winner over Hal 
Davis Club, are tied for third 
place just two points off the top. 

The standings: Brett Club, 
32-16 and total pinfall of 
14,618; Morrissey Club, 31-17 
[14,839]; Montclair, 30-18 



[14,663]; Granite Lodge 1451, 
30-18 [14,382]; Wollaston 
Bowladrome, 25-23 [14,360]; 
Atlantic Fuel Oil, 24-24 
[ 14,550] ; Hutchinson Oil, 24-24 
[14,462]; Bryan Post VFW, 
23-25 [14,324]; Hennessy 

Plumbing, 21-27 [ 14,252] ; D.A. 
George Burke, 21-27 [14,237]; 
School Comm. Hal Davis, 21-27 
[14,097]; Local 513 NEJB, 
AFL-CIO, 19-29 [14,257]; 
Quincy Lodge of Elks, 17-31 
[14,310]; James R. Mclntyre 
Club, 17-31 [14,193]. 



Dan Finn of Burke Club has 
high average of 97.4, followed 
by Mike Regan, Elks, 97.0; Nick 
Anastas, Montclair, 96.24; Brian 
Connolly, 1451, 95.6; John 
Andrews, Brett, 90.28; Ken 
Allman, Morrissey, 90.25; Larry 
McGrath, Bowladrome, 90.23; 
Jim McAllister, Atlantic, 90.22; 
Kev Mullaney, Bryan, 90.3, and 
Tony Alessi, Hutchinson, 89.2. 

Montclair has high team three 
of 1303 and high team single of 
473, while Anastas has high 
individual three of 324 and high 
single of 122. 



O'Brien Club Hosts Weymouth Alphas 



The undefeated O'Brien Club 
basketball team of Quincy, 
which swept through the first 
third of its schedule with a 
minimum of difficulty, is doing 
the same through the second 
third. 

Last night [Wednesday] the 
Quincy team played the 
Plymouth A.A. at Plymouth 
seeking its 1 1 th successive 
Cranberry League win and 12th 
in a row overall. Sunday the 
O'Briens will host the 
Weymouth Alphas at North 



Quincy High at 7:30 p.m. 

Last Sunday the Quincy 
quintet defeated the Easton 
Huskies for the second time, 
97-79, leading throughout the 
game. 

Eddie Miller paced the scoring 
with 20 points, Alan Dalton had 
18, Bob McNamara and Pete 
Schmid 15 apiece and Ron 
Bradley 10. 

The O'Brien Club doesn't 
charge admission to its home 
games and Coach Leo Papile is 



pleased with the turnouts each 
Sunday. "We don't charge 
anything because we want to let 
as many students see the games 
as possible," he said. "The fans 
are seeing some of the finest 
former college players in the 
East in action and the players' 
attitude is incredible. 

"There are no prima donnas 
on this team and there is never 
any complaint when I substitute. 
No one is concerned with how 
many points he scores as long as 
the team wins." 



Babysitters and potential 
babysitters are invited to attend 
a free four-session course on 
how to babysit. 

The courses, sponsored by 
Quincy Community Action, 
Inc., held at St. Boniface Church 
Hall on Wednesday, Jan. 16, Jan. 
23, Jan. 30 and Feb. 6, at 3 p.m. 

Pre-registration can be made 
by calling the South-West 
Community Center at 471-0796 
or the Germantown Service 
Center at 471-1 189. 

Graduates of the course will 
have their names placed on file 
at Quincy Community Action's 
two service centers in 
Germantown and South-West 
Quincy. Parents calling for 



"Sitters" will be given the name 
of a trained "sitter". 
Coordinating the program is 
Rosemarie Hanley, Department 
of Community Affairs 
Volunteer. 

Agencies and lecturers for the 
series will be: The Quincy Fire 
Department, Lt. William Kelley; 
The Quincy Police Department; 
The Quincy Health Department, 
Mary Taylor, R.N.; Norfolk 
County Extension Service, 
Nutrition Assistant Verne Eiker; 
Thomas Crane Public Library, 
Librarian Jane Granstrom; South 
Shore Mental Health Center, Dr. 
Luleen Anderson, Quincy Team 
Leader. 



Frank Younie Receives 
Navy Commendation 



Reardon, Murphy Pace Mite A's, 5-1 



Rick Reardon and Tommy 
Murphy had two goals each as 

the Quincy Mite "A" team 
defeated Hingham, 5-1, in Bay 



Colony Hockey Association 
action. 

Danny Kelly had the other 
goal and assists went to Kevin 
Tenney [2], Dwayne Wilcoxen 



Squirt B's Win, 8-4 



[2], Dave Allen and Paul Egan. 
Mike McArdle, Brian Chase, 
Mike Colon, Larry Costello, 
Bobby Lynch and Tommy 
Schofield were outstanding on 
defense. 



Navy Engineman Third Class 
Frank S. Younie, son of Mr. and 
Mrs. Frank N. Younie of 84 
Turner St., Quincy, was 
commended as a crewmember of 
the oiler USS Pawcatuck for his 
efforts as part of the U.S. Sixth 
Fleet task force in the 
Mediterranean during the latest 
Middle East crisis. 

The powerful force stood 

"ready to evacuate American 

citizens from danger areas and to 

back up our government's 

diplomats as they helped 



negotiate a cease fire. 



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The Squirt B team defeated 
South Boston, 84. 

Mike McNiece scored three 
goals, Kevin Ryan and Brian 
Sullivan two each and Johnny 



Cummings the other for Quincy. 
Richie Stevens had two assists, 
Paul McCabe, Sullivan, Timmy 
Ryan, Danny Boyle, Kevin Duff 
and Chris Gorman one apiece. 






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Page 22 Quincy Sun Thursday, January 17, 1974 



Powers Requests, 

Gets Action 

At Sled Area 

Almost as soon as new Ward 5 
Councillor Warren A. Powers 
fired off his first request to 
Mayor Walter J. Hannon he 
found that something had been 
done about it. 

Powers requested the 
appointment of temporary 
constables to supervise 
youngsters playing in the snow 
in a recreation area adjacent to 
the Furnace Brook School. 

He sent the letter Friday (Jan. 

111. 

"Saturday," he said, "the 
Park Department had men there 
with bull horns and a walkie 
talkie. They had divided the 
people up into groups for safety 
purposes and everything was 
under control. 

"It's a good thing, too. There 
must have been hundreds of 
people there." 

Powers said in his letter to 
Hannon that he has learned of 
injuries suffered in accidents at 
the location. 

"With the new fallen snow," 
he said, "many youngsters will 
be rushing to this area in order 
to try out their toboggans, sleds, 
saucers and other snow 
vehicles... 

"With this expected rush 
come some careless individuals 
who do not respect the rights of 
others and who push around 
little children and create a 
hazard of injury to others by 
their reckless operation of sleds 
or toboggans." 

Kelly Requests 

Merrymount 
School Study 

City Councillor Leo J. Kelly 
has asked Council President 
Arthur H. Tobin to have a 
committee review the special 
needs of the Merrymount 
School. 

"I have personally observed 
the conditions at the school and 
have found that space is 
desperately needed for physical 
education in order to comply 
with the state law which requires 
90 minutes per week for 
physical education. 

"In addition to the space 
requirements for physical 
education, there is absolutely no 
area available to properly 
comply with the school lunch 
program. 

"Furthermore, music 
education has to be conducted 
in the basement or boiler room. 

"It is my understanding of the 
state law that the city of Quincy 
would be entitled to 65 per cent 
reimbursement for renovations 
which would upgrade the 
educational standards at the 
Merrymount school." 

LEGAL NOTICES 

I- H I ■ — 'I- — — ■ ■ ■ !■■!. «■ I -II 

LOST PASSBOOK 

The following passbook No. 155 has 
been lost, destroyed or stolen and 
application for payment has been 
made in accordance with Section 20, 
Chapter 167, General Laws. The 
finder will please return to the 
Shipbuilders Coop. Bank, 1 Granite 
St., Quincy, MA. 
1/17-24/74 

LOST PASSBOOK 

The following passbook No. 7034-4 
has been lost, destroyed or stolen and 
application for payment has been 
made in accordance with Section 20, 
Chapter 167, General Laws. The 
finder will please return to the 
Granite Co-operative Bank, 440 
Hancock Street, Quincy, Mass. 
02171. 
1/17-24/74 



LEGAL NOTICES 



COMMONWEALTH OF 

MASSACHUSETTS 

Norfolk, ss. Probate Court 

No. 74P0034 

To all persons interested in the 
estate of NORMAN GOODWIN late 
of Quincy in said County, deceased. 
And to the Attorney General of said 
Commonwealth, if required. 

A petition has been presented to 
said Court for probate of a certain 
instrument purporting to be the last 
will of said deceased by NORMAN 
GOODWIN JR. of Quincy in the 
County of Norfolk praying that he be 
appointed executor thereof without 
giving a surety on his bond. 

If you desire to object thereto you 
or your attorney should file a written 
appearance in said Court at Dedham 
before ten o'clock in the forenoon on 
the thirteenth day of February 1974, 
the return day of this citation. 

Witness, ROBERT M. FORD, 
Esquire, First Judge of said Court, 
this ninth day of January 1974. 

PAUL C. GAY, 
Register. 
1/17-24-31/74 



COMMONWEALTH OF 

MASSACHUSETTS 

Norfolk, ss. Probate Court 

No. 199,435 

To all persons interested in the 
estate of KALAL LAHAGE late of 
Quincy in said County, deceased. 
And to the Attorney General of said 
Commonwealth, if required. 

A petition has been presented to 
said Court for probate of a certain 
instrument purporting to be the last 
will dated March 3, 1970 of said 
deceased by BEDROS BAHARIAN 
of Quincy in the County of Norfolk 
praying that he be appointed 
executor thereof without giving a 
surety on his bond. 

If you desire to object thereto you 
or your attorney should file a written 
appearance in said Court at Dedham 
before ten o'clock in the forenoon on 
the twenty-seventh day of March 
1974, the return day of this citation. 

Witness, ROBERT M. FORD, 
Esquire, First Judge of said Court, 
this ninth day of January 1974. 

PAUL C. GAY, 
Register. 
1/17-24-31/74. 

COMMONWEALTH OF 

MASSACHUSETTS 

Norfolk, ss. Probate Court 

No. 74P0012 

To the Treasurer and Receiver 
General of said Commonwealth, and 
to all persons interested in the estate 
of FLORENCE GWYNN late of 
Quincy in said County, deceased. 

A petition has been presented to 
said Court, praying that JAMES R. 
LAWLER of Needham in said 
County of Norfolk, public 
administrator, be appointed 
administrator of said estate. 

If you desire to object thereto you 
or your attorney should file a written 
appearance in said Court at Dedham 
before ten o'clock in the forenoon on 
the thirteenth day of February 1974, 
the return day of this citation. 

Witness, ROBERT M. FORD, 
Esquire, First Judge of said Court, 
this tenth day of January 1974. 

PAUL C. GAY 
Register. 
1/17-24-31/74 



COMMONWEALTH OF 

MASSACHUSETTS 

Norfolk, ss. Probate Court 

No. 74P0037 

To all persons interested in the 
estate of VERA F. G. NASON late of 
Quincy in said County, deceased. 

A petition has been presented to 
said Court praying that HELEN N. 
WHITTIER of Duxbury in the 
County of Plymouth be appointed 
administratrix of said estate without 
giving a surety on her bond. 

If you desire to object thereto you 
or your attorney should file a written 
appearance in said Court at Dedham 
before ten o'clock in the forenoon on 
the thirteenth day of February 1974, 
the return day of this citation. 

Witness, ROBERT M. FORD, 
Esquire, First Judge of said Court, 
this tenth day of January 1974. 

PAUL C. GAY, 
Register. 
1/17-24-31/74 



LEGAL NOTICES 



COMMONWEALTH OF 

MASSACHUSETTS 

Norfolk, ss. Probate Court 

No. 199,532 

To all persons interested in the 
estate of MARIE C. DiANTONIO 
late of Quincy in said County, 
deceased. 

A petition has been presented to 
said Court praying that ANN 
DiANTONIO of Quincy in the 
County of Norfolk be appointed 
administratrix of said estate without 
giving a surety on her bond. 

If you desire to object thereto you 
or your attorney should file a written 
appearance in said Court at Dedham 
before ten o'clock in the forenoon on 
the sixth day of February 1974, the 
return day of this citation. 

Witness, ROBERT M. FORD, 
Esquire, First Judge of said Court, 
this second day of January 1974. 

PAUL C. GAY, 
Register. 
1/10-17-24/74 



COMMONWEALTH OF 

MASSACHUSETTS 

Norfolk, ss. Probate Court 

No. 193,600 

To the Treasurer and Receiver 
General of said Commonwealth, and 
to all persons interested in the estate 
of ROGER B. CARON late of 
Quincy in said County, deceased. 

The Public Administrator of said 
estate has presented to said Court his 
first account for allowance and a 
petition for distribution of the 
balance in his hands. 

If you desire to object thereto you 
or your attorney should file a written 
appearance in said Court at Dedham, 
before ten o'clock in the forenoon on 
the thirteenth day of February 1974, 
the return day of this citation. 

Witness, ROBERT M. FORD, 
Esquire, First Judge of said Court, 
this seventh day of January 1974. 

PAUL C. GAY, 
Register. 
1/17-24-31/74 



COMMONWEALTH OF 

MASSACHUSETTS 

Norfolk, ss. Probate Court 

No. 74P0033 

To all persons interested in the 
estate of CHESTER A. DENNISON 
late of Quincy in said County, 
deceased. And to the Attorney 
General of said Commonwealth, if 
required. 

A petition has been presented to 
said Court for probate of a certain 
instrument purporting to be the last 
will of said deceased by DORIS D. 
RIDDICK of Quincy in the County 
of Norfolk praying that she be 
appointed executrix thereof without 
giving a surety on her bond. 

If you desire to object thereto you 
or your attorney should file a written 
appearance in said Court at Dedham 
before ten o'clock in the forenoon on 
the thirteenth day of February 1974, 
the return day of this citation. 

Witness, ROBERT M. FORD, 
Esquire, First Judge of said Court, 
this ninth day of January 1974. 

PAUL C. GAY, 
Register. 
1/17-24-31/74 



COMMONWEALTH OF 
MASSACHUSETTS 

Norfolk, ss. Probate Court 

No. 192,644 

To all persons interested in the 
estate of ELIZABETH H. 
O'CONNELL late of Quincy in said 
County, deceased. And to the 
Attorney General of said 
Commonwealth, if required. 

The executor of the will of said 
deceased has presented to said Court 
for allowance his first and final 
account. 

If youdesire to object thereto you 
or your attorney should file a written 
appearance in said Court at Dedham 
before ten o'clock in the forenoon on 
the thirteenth day of February 1974, 
the return day of this citation. 

Witness, ROBERT M. FORD, 
Esquire, First Judge of said Court, 
this eleventh day of January 1974. 

PAUL C. GAY, 
Register. 
1/17-24-31/74 



LEGAL NOTICES 



COMMONWEALTH OF 

MASSACHUSETTS 

Norfolk, ss. Probate Court 

No. 199,567 

To S. ALICE BARRON also 
known as ALICE BARRON of 
Quincy in the County of Norfolk, 
and to her heirs apparent or 
presumptive and to the Massachusetts 
Department of Mental Health. And 
to the Attorney General of said 
Commonwealth, if required. 

A petition has been presented to 
said Court alleging that the aforesaid 
S. ALICE BARRON has become 
incapacitated by reason of advanced 
age - mental weakness - to properly 
care for her property and praying 
that ELIZABETH G. PITNOF of 
Quincy in said County, or some other 
suitable person, be appointed 
conservator of her property. 

If you desire to object thereto, 
you or your attorney should file a 
written appearance in said Court at 
Dedham before ten o'clock in the 
forenoon on the sixth day of 
February 1974, the return day of this 
citation. 

Witness, ROBERT M. FORD, 
Esquire, First Judge of said Court, 
this second day of January, 1974. 

PAUL C. GAY, 
Register. 
1/10-17-24/74 



COMMONWEALTH OF 

MASSACHUSETTS 

Norfolk, ss. Probate Court 

No. 199,025 

To all persons interested in the 
estate of SAB ATINO 
GIANNANGELI late of Quincy in 
said County, deceased. And to the 
Attorney General of said 
Commonwealth, if required. 

A petition has been presented to 
said Court for probate of a certain 
instrument purporting to be the last 
will of said deceased by JOSEPH S. 
CIPOLLA of Quincy in the County 
of Norfolk and BENEDETTO 
PAONE of Quincy in the County of 
Norfolk praying that they be 
appointed executors thereof without 
giving a surety on their bond. 

If you desire to object thereto you 
or your attorney should file a written 
appearance in said Court at Dedham 
before ten o'clock in the forenoon on 
the sixth day of February 1974, the 
return day of this citation. 

Witness, ROBERT M. FORD. 
Esquire, First Judge of said Court, 
this twenty-sixth day of December 
1973. 

PAUL C. GAY, 
Register. 
1/10-17-24/74 



COMMONWEALTH OF 
MASSACHUSETTS 

Norfolk, ss. Probate Court 

No. 199.541 

To all persons interested in the 
estate of LOUIS G. DiBONA late of 
Quincy in said County, deceased. 
And to the Attorney General of said 
Commonwealth, if required. 

A petition has been presented to 
said Court for probate of a certain 
instrument purporting to be the last 
will of said deceased by RUTH A. 
DiBONA of Quincy in the County of 
Norfolk praying that she be 
appointed executrix thereof without 
giving a surety on her bond. 

If you desire to object thereto you 
or your attorney should file a written 
appearance in said Court at Dedham 
before ten o'clock in the forenoon on 
the sixth day of February 1974, the 
return day of this citation. 

Witness, ROBERT M. FORD, 
Esquire, First Judge of said Court, 
this second day of January, 1974. 

PAUL C. GAY, 
Register. 
1/10-17-24/74 



ANNUAL REPORT 

The annual report of the Nathan & 
Eva Brezner Charitable Foundation is 
available for inspection during regular 
business hours at the office of the 
Foundation. 

Requests for information must be 
made within 180 days after the date 
of this notice. 

The Foundation is located at 7 
Water Street, Boston, Mass., 02109. 
Nathan Brezner, Trustee 
1/17/74 



LEGAL NOTICES 



COMMONWEALTH OF 

MASSACHUSETTS 

Norfolk, ss. Probate Court 

No. 196,726 

To all persons interested in the 
estate of LEO E. MULLIN late of 
Quincy in said County, deceased. 
And to the Attorney General of said 
Commonwealth, if required. 

A petition has been presented to 
said Court, praying that STEPHEN T. 
KEEFE, JR. of Quincy in the County 
of Norfolk be appointed 
administrator with the will annexed 
of said estate not already 
administered, without giving a surety 
on his bond. 

If you desire to object thereto you 
or your attorney should file a written 
appearance in said Court at Dedham 
before ten o'clock in the forenoon on 
the thirtieth day of January 1974, 
the return day of this citation. 

Witness, ROBERT M. FORD, 
Esquire, First Judge of said Court, 
this twenty-first day of December 
1973. 

PAUL C. GAY, 
Register. 
1/3-10-17/74 



COMMONWEALTH OF 
MASSACHUSETTS 

Norfolk, ss. Probate Court 

No. D-33654 

To PATRICIA A YEUNG of Parts 
Unknown. 

A libel has been presented to said 
Court by your husband, DAVID Y. 
YEUNG of Quincy in the County of 
Norfolk praying that a divorce from 
the bond of matrimony between 
himself and you be decreed for the 
cause of cruel and abusive treatment. 

If you desire to object thereto, 
you or your attorney should file a 
written appearance in said Court at 
Dedham within twenty-one days 
from the twentieth day of March 
1974, the return day of this citation. 

Witness, ROBERT M. FORD, 
Esquire, First Judge of said Court, 
this twenty-first day of December 
1973. 

PAUL C. GAY, 
Register. 
1/10-17-24/74 

COMMONWEALTH OF 

MASSACHUSETTS 

Norfolk, ss. Probate Court 

No. 199,450 

To all persons interested in the 
estate of ETHEL M. SMITH late of 
Quincy in said County, deceased. 
And to the Attorney General of said 
Commonwealth, if required. 

A petition has been presented to 
said Court for probate of a certain 
instrument purporting to be the last 
will of said deceased by MARION 
AUFIERO of Quincy in the County 
of Norfolk praying that she be 
appointed executrix thereof without 
giving a surety on her bond. 

If you desire to object thereto you 
or your attorney should file a written 
appearance in said Court at Dedham 
before ten o'clock in the forenoon on 
the sixth day of February 1974, the 
return day of this citation. 

Witness, ROBERT M. FORD, 
Esquire, First Judge of said Court, 
this second day of January 1974. 

PAUL C. GAY, 
Register. 
1/10-17-24/74 

COMMONWEALTH OF 

MASSACHUSETTS 

Norfolk, ss. Probate Court 

No. 175,274 

To all persons interested in the 
estate of JAMES J. McDONALD late 
of Quincy in said County, deceased. 
And to the Attorney General of said 
Commonwealth, if required. 

The executrix of the will of said 
deceased has presented to said Court 
for allowance her first and final 
account. 

If you desire to object thereto you 
or your attorney should file a written 
appearance in said Court at Dedham 
before ten o'clock in the forenoon on 
the twenty-third day of January 
1974, the return day of this citation. 

Witness, ROBERT M. FORD, 
Esquire, First Judge of said Court, 
this nineteenth day of December 
1973. 

PAUL C. GAY, 
Register. 
1/3-10-17/74 



Thursday, January 17, 1974 Quincy Sun Page 23 




LEGAL NOTICES 



COMMONWEALTH OF 

MASSACHUSETTS 

Norfolk, ss. Probate Court 

No. 114,954 

To all persons interested in the 
estate of TERESA DiPRISCO late of 
Quincy in said County, deceased, and 
to JOHN A. HUTCHINS of 
Weymjuth in the County of Norfolk, 
trustee, who has not resigned. And to 
the Attorney General of said 
Commonwealth, if required. 

A petition has been presented to 
said Court praying that JOHN A. 
HUTCHINS be removed from his 
office as trustee, and that WILLIAM 
B. LAMPREY of Braintree in the 
County of Norfolk or some other 
suitable person, be appointed his 
successor. 

If you desire to object thereto you 
or your attorney should file a written 
appearance in said Court at Dedham 
before ten o'clock in the forenoon on 
the twenty-third day of January 
1974, the return day of this citation 
and you said JOHN A. HUTCHINS 
are cited to appear in said Court at 
10:00 a.m. on said return day to 
resign. 

Witness, ROBERT M. FORD, 
Esquire, First Judge of said Court, 
this nineteenth day of December 
1973. 

PAUL C. GAY, 
Register. 
1/3-10-17/74 

COMMONWEALTH OF 
MASSACHUSETTS 

Norfolk, ss. Probate Court 

No. 199,421 

To all persons interested in the 
estate of DEBORAH HOFFMAN late 
of Quincy in said County, deceased. 

A petition has been presented to 
said Court praying that ALFRED S. 
SWANSON of Weymouth in the 
County of Norfolk be appointed 
administrator of said estate without 
giving a surety on his bond. 

If you desire to object thereto you 
or your attorney should file a written 
appearance in said Court at Dedham 
before ten o'clock in the forenoon on 
the twenty-third day of January 
1974, the return day of this citation. 

Witness, ROBERT M. FORD, 
Esquire, First Judge of said Court, 
this nineteenth day of December 
1973. 

PAUL C. GAY, 
Register. 
1/3-10-17/74 

COMMONWEALTH OF 
MASSACHUSETTS 

Norfolk, ss. Probate Court 

No. 199,437 

To ANNIE M. RIZZI of Quincy in 
the County of Norfolk, and to her 
heirs apparent or presumptive and to 
the Massachusetts Department of 
Mental Health. And to the Attorney 
General of said Commonwealth, if 
required. 

A petition has been presented to 
said Court alleging that said ANNIE 
M. RIZZI has become incapacitated 
by reason of advanced age, mental 
weakness, to properly care for-Jier 
Property and praying that NORMAN 
J. RIZZI of San Francisco in the 
State of California, or some other 
suitable person, be appointed 
conservator of her property. 

If you desire to object thereto, 
you or your attorney should file a 
written appearance in said Court at 
Dedham before ten o'clock in the 
forenoon on the thirtieth day of 
January 1974, the return day of this 
citation. 

Witness, ROBERT M. FORD, 
Esquire, First Judge of said Court, 
this twenty-first day of December 
1973. 

PAUL C. GAY, 
Register. 
1/3-10-17/74 



Save Gas and Money ... 
shop locally. 



HELP WANTED 



OFFICE HELP 

Person with general office 
experience to handle Finance 
Company. Typing, adding 
machine experience necessary. 
Full time, hours 9 - 5 p.m. Good 
pay and benefits. 282-441 2 
liiL 



FOR SALE 



MATTRESSES 



MATTRESSES - -Immediate 
Delivery. Can you use 
exceptionally good buys on 
king, queen, full or twin 
mattresses, beds, trundles, 
bunks at discount. Brand 
names, Sealy, Eclipse, 
Slumberland, Englander, etc. 
Bedding has been our only 
business for over 20 years. 
Open eves., Siesta Sleep 
Shops, 221 Parkingway, 
Quincy, Corner of School 
Street. 

T.F. 



SERVICES 



GENERAL CARPENTRY 

Remodelling, Repairs, Additions. 
Bathrooms, Kitchens, Playrooms, 
etc. Call evenings. 

John D. Mignosa 
479-4865 2/7 



HELP WANTED 



HELP WANTED 

You can buy Sarah Coventry 
Jewelry or you can get it free. 
Phone 843-1675 evenings 5 to 7 
and learn how you can become a 
FASHION SHOW DIRECTOR. 
Interesting and profitable. 

1/31 



AUTOS 



18 and 20 miles per gallon. 1966 
Mercury Comet 2-Door vinyl 
hardtop. Automatic, Radio, 
Heater. Clean inside and out. No 
dents. Call after 4. $495. 
479-6968. 

1/10 



1970 BLAZER 

4-wheel drive with super lift 
power angle plow. Top yellow 
light and plow lights. Low 
mileage. V-8, 4 new tires. $3,195. 



471-1856. 



1/17 



Newsboys 

(And, Netcsgirh, Too) 

WANTED 




1601 Hancock St. 

471-3100 



! 



SERVICES OFFERED 



I 



SERVICES OFFERED 



FLOORS & WALLS 

Linoleum, ceramic tile, formica, sold & installed. Hardwood 
floors laid, sanded and finished. Many specials in our store. 
Wall Tile, carpeting, Armstrong floor coverings of all types 
at reduced prices. 

ART FLOOR COMPANY 

1 15 Sagamore St., North Quincy 

328-6970 

Open 8:00-5:00 Daily 
Closed Sat. 

GET ACQUAINTED SPECIAL 

WASH-WAX+ POLISH 

YOUR KITCHEN FLOOR 

TO A BEAUTIFUL FINISHED SHINE 

$ 3.50 

WET STRIPPING EXTRA 
CALL ANYTIME 96 1-1440 

Small Businesses our Specialty 



CHILD CARE 

Rent-A-Parent, Young married 
South Shore couples will care 
for your home and children 
while you enjoy your 
vacation. Interviews and 
References available. 

UNIVERSITY 

HOME SERVICES 

961-1616 RANDOLPH 
449-3590 NEEDHAM 

T.F. 

CARPENTRY 

Licensed builder, 26 years 
experience. Repairs, remodeling & 
additions. No job too small, hree 
estimates. Charles J. Ross, 
479-3755. 

1ST 
APPLIANCE REPAIRS 



PHOTOGRAPHY 



GETTING MARRIED? Bill 
Johnston will photograph your 
wedding for $95. Complete 
coverage. Announcement photos 
free. Call days 



696-1704, 



Eves 328-1423. 



1/24 



FUEL OIL 

DOYLE & LONG 
FUEL OIL 



HEATING EQUIPMENT 
624 Hancock St., Wollaston 
Tel: 472-4800 T.F. 

HALL FOR RENT 



Washers, 

electric 

Kenmore, 

Maytag, 

service. 



dryers, dishwashers, 

ranges. Whirlpool, 

G.E., Westinghouse, 

Kitchenaid. 24-hour 



PAUL BENNETT, 

288-0663. 1/24 

KEYS MADE 

Locksmith on Duty 

GRANITE CITY 

HARDWARE 

1617 Hancock St., Quincy 

479-5454 

T.F. 



North Quincy K. of C. Building, 5 
Hollis Ave. For information 
please call, 

328-5552 - 328-0087 - 

328-9822 

T.F. 



WEAVER 
FOREIGN AUTO 

Service Certified Jaguar-Rolls 
technician. 26 yrs experience 
servicing all foreign cars. 
Quality work guaranteed 

843-8663 T - F - 

INSURANCE 



HOME OWNERS RATES ARE 
LOWER: If you have a , basic 
Homeowner's policy for $20,000 
and are paying more than $62.00 
a year, call 282-4412 at once. 
Rutstein Insurance Agency. 



Index for 
Classified 

A Services 

B For Sale 

C Autos 

D Boats 

E For Rent 

F Help Wanted 

G Pets, Livestock 

H Lost and Found 

I Real Estate for Sale 

J Real Estate Wanted 

K Miscellaneous 

L .Work Wanted 

M Antiques 

N Coins and Stamps 

O Rest Homes 

P Instruction 



«*#2 



MAIL TO: QUINCY SUN 1601 Hancock St., Quincy 02169 
WANT ADS PAYABLE IN ADVANCE...cash must accompany order 
Enclosed '■» (nr the following ad to run times 



COPY: 



Rata: 
Contract rate: 



$2.25 for one week, up to 20 words, 5d each additional word. 

$2.00 per week, up to 20 words for three or more insertions of 

the same ad. 

No refund will be made at this contract rate in the event of 

cancellation. 

Deadline: Friday 5 P.M. for the following weeks publication. 

Please include your phone number in ad. 



Page 24 Quincy Sun Thursday, January 17, 1974 




FOND MEMORIES — Senator Edward Kennedy and Quincy Sun Publisher Henry 
Bosworth look at photo taken of Bosworth and President-elect John F. Kennedy in 
Hyannis in 1960. "I remember that," smiled Kennedy as he also picked Kenneth 
O'Donnell and Pierre Salinger out of photo. 

[Quincy Sun Photo by Laban H. Whittaker] 



DISTINGUISHED VISITORS - Sen. Edward M. Kennedy [left] and his nephew, 
Joseph [second right] are shown with Richard J. Koch and Advertising Director John 
B. Powers [right] during a visit to the Quincy Sun last week. Koch, executive secretary 
of the Quincy Park-Recreation Board, escorted them around Quincy. 
[Quincy Sun Photo by Laban Whittaker] 



Quincy H.S. Band Gets Approval To Use President's Seal 



Something new will soon be 
added to the logo of the crack 
Quincy High School Marching 
Band. 

It's the official Seal of the 
President of the United States. 

The band has received 
permission, by executive order, 
to use the Seal of the President 
"with pride and dignity, as one 
of the premier marching bands 
in the nation". 

Permission was contained in a 
letter received by Band Director 
Michael J. Cahill from Dudley 



Chapman, associate counsel to 
President Richard M. Nixon. 

Cahill requested permission 
about two months ago to use the 
Seal inside the letter Q on the 
band's banners, on the bass 
drum and on the jackets of the 
bandsmen. 

The return letter, dated Jan. 9 
on White House stationary, said: 

"This will acknowledge your 
letter requesting permission to 
use the Seal of the President of 
the United States in a logo being 
designed for the Quincy High 



School 'Marching President's 
Band'. 

"Your letter states that the 
band is so named because 
Quincy, which is the birthplace 
of John Adams and John Quincy 
Adams, is known as the City of 
Presidents. 

"your letter further 
guarantees that the band would 
use the Seal with pride and 
dignity, as one of the premier 
marching bands in the nation. 

"As you may know, 



permission to use the 
Presidential Seal is controlled by 
statute and an executive order 
issued thereunder. 

"Section 1 of the order 
permits use for such exceptional 
historical and educational 
purposes as may be authorized 
in writing by the Counsel to the 
President. 

"In view of the historical 
purposes described in your 
letter, and of your assurance as 
to the manner of use, permission 



is hereby granted to purchase 
the Presidential Seal for such 
uses." 

Cahill said the new logo, 
complete with Presidential Seal, 
probably will make its initial 
appearance in the spring at 
Schaeffer Stadium in a band 
contest sponsored by the 
Massachusetts Musical Educators 
Association and the Governor. 

The winner of the 
competition will be designated 
official state band for the 
coming bicentennial observance. 



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WERE 
OVER STOCKED 



OUR STORE IS COMPLETELY FULL, AND WE HAVE 5 TRAILER LOADS OF CARPET AND TILE COMING IN NEXT MONTH. WE 
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GAINS YOU CAN SAVE ON MOST GOODS FOR THIS SALE WILL BE SOLD AT OR BELOW WHOLESALE. SO DO YOURSELF 
AND US A FAVOR AND COME IN FOR THIS SALE. REMEMBER ALSO THAT MANY ITEMS ARE 1 OF A KIND, SO SHOP 
EARLY FOR YOUR BEST SELECTION. 



save * * $ Do-it-yourself 
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19 colors to choose from. 50 pieces of Cer. Cap 

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All first quality. Choice of 6 colors 
cut from 6' or 12' rolls while you wait. 

$2.29 sq-Yd. 



'NO WAX' INLAID 

LINOLEUM 

By Congoleum and G.A.F. Industries 

Many-many colors to choose from. Cut from rolls. 
Take it with you or we will arrange installation. 
These exciting colors and designs have a built-in 
cushion effect for underfoot comfort. It may be 
cemented down or laid without cement 



FLOOR TILES 



9x9 

LINOLEUM OR VINYL 

ASBESTOS TILES 



50 



9*9 

SOUDVINYl 
TILE 



100 



Ea. 



12x12 

SELF STICK VINYL 

ASBESTOS TILE 



290 



Ea. 



12x12 

SELF STICK 
SOUP VINYL TILE 



390 



Ea. 



$3.79 Sq.Yd. 



100% NYLON TWEED 
OMMERCIAL WEAVE! 

High density rubber-back. No special 
tolls to install carpeting. Choice of colors 



$4.99 



Sq. Yd. 



ROYAL TILE & CARPET CENTER 

>STE»CHARM| feANKAMERKAR* QUINCY ' "SXMS!™ 

86 Washington Street - 472-9283 



OPEN Mon., Thurs., Fri., 9 A.M. - 9 P.M., Tues., Wed., Sat. 9 A.M. - 6 P.M. 



n ran m 



The Butler? Us? American Hardware Stores Buyers? 



V 






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& V 



America 
Hardware 

-TORE 5 



somebody went bananas 
and we're jammed with 
timely merchandise plus 
left-overs! Clues are 
store-wide — help 
solve the 

:earancii 



f 












AT OUR REGULAR 
LOW PRICES 



American 
Hardware 



VJJJU I 




Follow the clues 
& prices . . . they 
SHOW & TELL 
you HOW TO 
solve our 
STORE-WIDE 
MYSTERY 
CLEARANCE! 




Big-A Aluminum 
SNOW SHOVELS 



1 8" x 1 Vh" ribbed alu- 
minum alloy blade for 
big snow jobs. Fire- 
Hardened® ash handle. 

CLEARANCE PRICED 










Our first real clue- 
this list of Clearance 
Merchandise... ^| 

read it carefully! ^ 

-. A Clue No. 

Clue io 

Alarm Clocks 2 , 3 

AutoSupplies \% 

BathShop \\ 

Batteries .10 mm 

Corn Popp«rs 5 ^^ 

Door Mats \\ 

Flashlights 18 

Fuel Cylinders . . < . ... 20 

Furnace Filters .18 

Hand Tools '4 

leaters 4 

lumidifiers 8,9 

jtchen Helpers ..16 

idders .11 

*t Bulbs X\ t \% 

jht Fixtures 5 

lops *n Brooms 6 16 

h- .-. y. .'.".' V 

'n Sundries 3 

Pipe Heat Tapes .19 ^f 

Power Tools . . .10 
Radios • ■ • . . 6 
Scott's Liquid Gold 7 

Shampoo/Polishers 16 

Shelving Units 2 

Snowscrapers 2 

Snow Shovels ' . . 8 

Step Stools 11 tflp 

Sun lamps \q ^J " 

Table Stoves ... 9 

•Tea Ketties . -, ... 5 

Thermometers ... 13 

Timers .... 7 

Vacuum Cleaners ... 10 

Vaporizers 6 

Wastebaskets 3 ID 

Weatherstripping Tape ^ 





50736/6 




TRUE TEMPER TIF10N-S R COATED 
SNOW SHOVELS, REG. $6.29, NOW 



SNOWSCRAPERS 
just might 
uncover 
Who Done 
It 



50738/24 




24" 
long 



/ 



CLEARANCE PRICED 



i 





Perfect tool for winter safety. 
5" plastic scraper head won't 
scratch windshield. Squeegee 
for sleet, fog; brush for snow. 



CHILDREN'S 

SNOW 

SHOVELS 



Hint: put one 
in your trunk 
for road 
emergencies! 




Kid-safe with no 
rough edges! 1 1 " 
xlO'/V' bright red 
steel blade; 34" 
overall. Comfort- 
able large handle. 






ANTHFREEZE 
SUMMER C00LA»T 



'UMLMTt 



50739,6 



Kendall 
"Year •Round" 

ANTI- FREEZE 



Protection from 
freezing or boil- 
ing. Won't foam, 
boil away. Pre- 
vents formation 
of scale deposits. 



GALLON 



01974 by AMERICAN HARDWARE SUPPLY COMPANY 

This catalog is created and printed as a service to our 2,000 stores. If any store is temporarily out of 
a regular stock item, it can be ordered by the store from our modern warehouses in Butler, Pa., 
Parkesburg, Pa. and Greenville, S. C. The prices shown are suggested prices from our observation 
of the market; they are subject to change without notice and possession of this catalog does not 
obligate us or any store to sell at the price listed. The combined volume purchasing power of our 
2,000 stores enables each store to offer you merchandise at attractive prices. Over 23,000 items 
are carried in stock at our hardware headquarters. 



CI 



HAND TIRE PUMPS 
for fast escapes! 



50742/1 



8-FT. 

COPPER -v 

BOOSTER GABLES 



CLEARANCE PRICED 



r> 



** 




37 



50740/ 1 



REG. $1.49 



CLEARANCE PRICED 



"Twist-proof" 
duplex cables 
will not snarl, 
knot or tangle. 
Copper-plated 
clamps. 

12 COPPER BOOSTER nmi,i 
CABLES, REG. $4.79, NOW 




387 



A? 

A small pump gr«^^ 
for light dutv »iW^^ 
flating jobjH^uqr 
ber base qJJKheck 
valv*wm£on- 
vei^nf fold-down 
stirrup, 1 4" hose. 




Schauer 6-AMP BATTERY CHARGERS 
will set you on the trail! 



Recharges 6-volt and 1 2-volt bat- 
teries at 6-ampere rate in 3 to 7 
hours. With automatic circuit break- 
er, selector switch, dial ammeter. 



CLEARANCE PRICED 




50743 I 




American always 
has the best 
products to 
SOLVE our DO- 
IT-YOURSELF 
problems year 
'round. Now they 
are clearing out 
January inventor 
to make room 
for fresh Spring 
merchandise. 



Our 6* Automatic 
PIPE HEAT TAPES 




Prevent freez- 
ing pipes! Pilot 
lamp glows when 
unit is heating 
"Press to test" 
when unit is. ^ 
not opera^XvV 
TheriflgstAol- 
ly^htfcllld. 
3<%,>I20V. 

OUR 9-FT. 45W PIPE HEAT 
TAPES, REG. $5.49 . . NOW 



3 



77 



50746 1 



M0RTITE TAPE keeps 
the heat in! 



50744/12 



CLEARANCE 
PRICED 





REG. $1.65 



Weatherstrip presses into place 
with fingertips. Keeps cold out, 
heat in. Use for caulking, too! 



. s 









3rd 
Clue 



An/in 

Whole House 

HUMIDIFIEES 

Handsome walnut-grain vinyl covered steel" cabinet 
houses continuous self-cleaning pad. Top air vents 
discharge 14.2 gal. every 24 hrs. at 70°F and 22°/o 
relative humidity. Automatic thermostat. Red light 
signals when tank is empty, machine shuts off auto- 
matically. 10-gal. plastic tank. 24"Wx 25Vi f, H x 14"D. 

CLEARANCE 
PRICED 



REG. $79.95 



hi 




50747/1 




TABLE HUMIDIFIERS 

Humidifies, circulates and filters dry 
indoor air! Self-regulating— cannot over- 
saturate room air. 4 -gal Ion capacity. 
Operates with no splash noise. 6' cord. 

CLEARANCE PRICED 





American 
Hardware 



OUR 40" 

BASEBOARD 

HEATERS 




50749/1 

Baseboard type portable heater with fan 
forced heat. Automatic thermostat main- 
tains temperature selected with wide 
range heat selector control. Finger-proof 
safety grille. Long-lasting tubular 
element. Tip-over safety switch. 1 320W. 



CLEARANCE PRICED 








AUTOMATIC 



FAN HEATERS warm 
up the evidence! 

Space saver heater with high-volume 
circulation— ideal for limited space. 
Automatic thermostat; wide range temp, 
control. Tip-over safety switch. 1 320W. 



CLEARANCE 
PRICED 




$11.98 



50755/12 




Our 
CORN 
BROOMS 
sweep thru 
mysteries! 




30751/ II 



CLEARANCE PRICED 



18" x 24" 

Wipe off foot- 
prints on ASTRO 

R MATS 

CLEARANCE PRICED 



TURTD 




Quality 100°/o 
broom corn that 
will give long, dur- 
able wear. Red 
metallic handle. 




REG. 
$2.99 



Thousands of 
sturdy blades 
"grass" whisk" 
mud & dirt from 
shoes. Easy to 
clean. Durable 
foam backing. * 
With a daisy, too! 






ST&gFIAVPLY RUNNERS 
won't trip Who Done It! 



Protect floor and 
carpet from dirt & 
moisture! Aluminum 
keep it from 

«ng— and it's 

ersible! 




16° X 
Step PA 

■V.-,;. 

Fine vinyl flooring 
cushioned with 
sponge rubber 
for comf oftr*^ 
Non-skid, easy to 
clean. Asstd. colors 



ft" 

GUE MATS 



Outdoor THERMOMETERS 

• EASY 
READER 

Large magni- 
fying tube 
for accurate 
reading. Ad- 
justable 
bracket. By 
Springfield. 

CLEARANCE 
PRICED 



97 4 97 



REG. $1.49 



I've been 

delivering 

truckload 

after truck- 
load of quality 
merchandise. 
So whoever 
done it had 
a good thing 
in mind • . . 
YOU! 




■^^H 



,,:$" 



Aivm 

Whole House 
Console HUKTDIFIEES 

Handsome walnut-grain vinyl covered steel" cabinet 
houses continuous self-cleaning pad. Top air vents 
discharge 1 4.2 gal. every 24 hrs. at 70°F and 22°/o 
relative humidity. Automatic thermostat. Red light 
signals when tank is empty, machine shuts off auto- 
matically. 10-gal. plastic tank. 24"Wx 25 , / 2 ,, H x 14"D. 

CLEARANCE 
PRICED 



REG. $79.95 




50747/1 









TABLE HUMIDIFIERS 



Humidifies, circulates and filters dry 
indoor air! Self-regulating— cannot over- 
saturate room air. 4-gallon capacity. 
Operates with no splash noise. 6' cord. 

CLEARANCE PRICED 





REG. $31.50 




50748/1 

HANKSCRAFT 



Amenc 
Hardware 

STORES 

BRAND 



OUR 40" 

BASEBOARD 

HEATERS 






50749/1 

Baseboard type portable heater with fan 
forced heat. Automatic thermostat main- 
tains temperature selected with wide 
range heat selector control. Finger-proof 
safety grille. Long-lasting tubular 
element. Tip-over safety switch. 1 320W. 



CLEARANCE PRICED 




AUTOMATIC 

FAN HEATERS warm 

up the evidence J 

Space saver heater with high-volume 
circulation— ideal for limited space. 
Automatic thermostat; wide range temp, 
control. Tip-over safety switch. 1 320W. 



CLEARANCE 
PRICED 



REG. 
$25.95 





Our 
CORN 
BROOMS 
sweep thru 
mysteries! 




18" x 24 



5075I/1J 



Wipe off foot- 
prints on ASTRO 
TURF® DOOR MATS 



CLEARANCE PRICED 



Quality 100°/o 
broom corn that 
will give long, dur- 
able wear. Red 
metallic handle. 




Thousands of | 
sturdy blades of 
"grass" whisk*" 
mud & dirt from 
shoes. Easy to 
clean. DwabK^ 
foam backing. * 
With a daisy, too! 



CLEARANCE PRICED 



I've been 
delivering 

truckload 

after truck- 
load of quality 
merchandise. 
So whoever 
done it had 
a good thing 
in mind • • • 
YOU! 



STA-FLAT POLY RUNNERS 
won f t trip Who Done It! 



Protect floor and 
Cjirpet from dirt & 
! Aluminum 
keep it from 
cu4mg— and it's 
gfersible! 



50752/36 



16" x 26" Soft- 
Step FATIGUE MATS 



Fine vinyl flooring 
cushioned with 
sponge rubber 
for comf orf? 85 ^ 
Non-skid, easy to 
clean. Asstd. colors. 



97 



'4 




Outdoor THERMOMETERS 

• EASY 
READER 

Large magni- 
fying tube 
for accurate 
reading. Ad- 
justable 
bracket. By 
Springfield. 



REG. $1.49 



■ 



American 
Hardware 

STORES 



I'd say it was 
a neat 'n tidy 
inside job! 
Only an EX- 
PERT could 
pull off such 
quality mer- 
chandise at 
such low 
prices! 



50757/12 



Mop up tracks 
with IT -DEE 
ffi SPONGE MOPS 

^ CLEARANCE PRICED 

7 Large cleaning sur- 
face for the big 
jobs. Heavy gauge 
spring hinge squeeze 
plate. Rust resist- 
ant hardware. 






50756/12 '- 



v****i 






*£? 



Dust away all 
clues with PETITE 
DUST MOPS 



Lightweight dust 
mop with rayon 
yarn for quick 
magnetic action. 
Mitt style for 
easy washing. 



[asWuiaxf.. 



507607)2 



Discard evidence 
in 15-QT. PLASTIC 
WASTEBASKETS 



Attractive Med- 
iterranean style. 
Square shape fits 
anywhere. Choose 
from assorted 
decorator colors. 



r « 






Zf* 



. .*■ 



6th 
Clue 



SCOTT 1 S LIQUID 
GOLD removes the 
fingerprints . . . 



. . . cares for ALL the 
wood in your home! Re- 
places moisture, keeps 
wood from drying out, 
eliminates scratches, 
removes dirt safely! 

CLEARANCE PRICED 



50758/12 



GOLD 

2UW AND PRESffvi- 

FOR WOOD 
PANELLING 

*0OD C^BINH) 

*'WTV- 14 FL 0B. i 1 * 

**5I «■»! • III' - 



Wash away proof 
with this 12-QT. 
SPOUT PAIL 



Lightweight 
plastic— easy 
to carry, won't 
scratch sink or 
floors. Easy- 
pour spout. 

CLEARANCE 
PRICED 



REG. $1.49 



Mate- 



5075? 6 



- -'■:-. -.■-- • ;s? - -;■ - wm • ■ ■•■■ ■' 



■ These 

I Eureka 550 

CANISTER VACS 
can be yours 
for a steal! 

Complete with 6-piece 
set of cleaning tools 

• UNBREAKABLE BRAID HOSE 

• PROTECTIVE VINYL BUMPER 

• QUICK RELEASE LID 

• CONVENIENT HANDLE 

• SMOOTH-ROLLING WHEELS 






/ 




% 



«KM 




/ 



50763/1 




^ 






Full power in a lightweight, easy- 
to-handle cleaner! Powerful, heavy 
duty motor provides more suction for 
deep, fast cleaning action. Hose fits 
directly into cleaner— no snaps. 

CLEARANCE PRICED 




REG. $34.95 



Polish away 
suspicion 
with Hoover 
SHAMPOO/ 

POLISHERS and 
accessories 



Hoover Deluxe 
CONVERTIBLE 

VACS— so 
evidence 
won't pile up! 

TRIPLE ACTION: 

IT BEATS AS IT SWEEPS 

AS IT CLEANS 




• SHAMPOOS 
CARPETS 

• POWER SCRUBS 
FLOORS 

• WAXES, BUFFS, 
POLISHES FLOORS 

• LIGHTWEIGHT 

• CONVENIENT 
STORAGE 

• LARGE 55 OUNCE 
TANK 

• SAFETY SWITCH 
HANDLE 

The safe, easy and 
economical way to 
bright, clean car- 
pets and lustrous 
floors! Hood design 
permits use under 
counters. "Wrap- 
Around" guard pre- 
vents splashing. 
Switch controlled 
by handle position: 
polisher will not 
turn on until han- 
dle is lowered to 
operating position 



American 
Hardware 

STORES 



I'd say it was 
a neat 
inside 
Only an 
PERT could 
pull off such 
quality mer- 
chandise 
such low 
prices! 



50757/12 



~*JI 



IQ^i 



50756/12] 



\&*A 



<gp> 



ii 



Dust away all 
clues with PETITE 
DUST MOPS 



Lightweight dust 
mop with rayon 
yarn for quick 
magnetic action. 
Mitt style for 
easy washing. 



Mop up tracks 
with IT -DEE 
SPONGE MOPS 

CLEARANCE PRICED 

Large cleaning sur- 
face for the big 
jobs. Heavy gauge 

w»cq spring hinge squeeze 

" plate. Rust resist- 

#Z.1V ant hardware. 



50760/12 



Discard evidence 
in 15-QT. PLASTIC 
WASTEBASKETS 



Attractive Med- 
iterranean style. 
Square shape fits 
anywhere. Choose 
from assorted 
decorator colors. 



j ." 



^ 



•'•' f» 









Teifff^ 



•ii'"* 85 *^ 



6th 
Clue 



t. 



■H 



% ?* 



%- 






SCOTT f S LIQUID 
GOLD removes the 
fingerprints 



• • • 



50758/12 



. . . cares for ALL the 
wood in your home! Re- 
places moisture, keeps 
wood from drying out, 
eliminates scratches, 
removes dirt safely! 

CLEARANCE PRICED 



16-OZ. 



REG. $2.49 



GOLD 



'■!»HEUND PRESET' 

FOR WOOD 
PANELLING 

**> "wwmi wow''** 

ar »'n-16fL0Zi ;P * 

"BllBII,!!"' 



Wash away proof 
with this 12-QT. 
SPOUT PAIL 



Lightweight 
plastic— easy 
to carry, won't 
scratch sink or 
floors. Easy- 
pour spout. 

CLEARANCE 
PRICED 



REG. $1.49 



50759/6 



mtvLi 



v , < 



These 
Eureka 550 

CANISTER VACS 
can be yours 
for a steal! 

Complete with 6-piece 
set of cleaning tools 

• UNBREAKABLE BRAID HOSE 

• PROTECTIVE VINYL BUMPER 

• QUICK RELEASE LID 

• CONVENIENT HANDLE 

• SMOOTH-ROLLING WHEELS 




Polish away 
suspicion 
with Hoover 
SHAMPOO/ 

POLISHERS and 
accessories 




Hoover Deluxe 
CONVERTIBLE 

VACS—so 
evidence 
won't pile up! 

TRIPLE ACTION: 

IT BEATS AS IT SWEEPS 

AS IT CLEANS 



« • NT, 



• SHAMPOOS 
CARPETS 

• POWER SCRUBS 
FLOORS 

• WAXES, BUFFS, 
POLISHES FLOORS 

• LIGHTWEIGHT 

• CONVENIENT 
STORAGE 

• LARGE 55 OUNCE 
TANK 

• SAFETY SWITCH 
HANDLE 

The safe, easy and 
economical way to 
bright, clean car- 
pets and lustrous 
floors! Hood design 
permits use under 
counters. "Wrap- 
Around" guard pre- 
vents splashing. 
Switch controlled 
by handle position: 
polisher will not 
turn on until han- 
dle is lowered to 
operating position 





Maybe this 
STORE-WIDE 
INVENTORY 
CLEARANCE 

of timely 
merchandise 

will prove 
WE-CARE 
service is 
NO MYSTERY! 





50774 6 



Is there evidence in 
the CUTIERY TRAYS? 



Great way to keep 
table cutlery 
neat and orderly. 
Separate compart- 
ments. 13 3 /4"x 

>>> 11%"xl%". 

*%jf Asstd. colors. 



CLEARANCE PRICED 

99* 



50768-73/6 



REG. $1.49 




Organize clues with 
DRAWER ORGANIZERS 



50764 /24 



Arrapae your drawers 

I #!H^Ur-keep things 
%pfglnTzed! Can be 

interlocked. Sand 

color. 



CLEARANCE PRICED 



33 



« 



REG. 
39« 



" mm *%H 



9"x3 



9" x 6" ORGANIZERS, REG. 494, mi/v 334 
15" x 3" ORGANIZERS, REG. 494, mm/u 334 
15" x 6" ORGANIZERS, REG. 794, nw/ii 634 




Co sco Utility 
ISTEP STOOLS ja 




Any clear prints 
on PLATE RACKS? 

Space-saver rack holds more plates in 
less space! Unbreakable, rustproof. 
Holds 4 sizes of plates. 1 7"x 6"x 5%". 



50775,6/1 



1:1mm. 
an 



oasoa 



CLEARANCE 
PRICED 




58 



REG. $1.98 



Sturdy lO'/z" stool for those "just-out-of- 
reach" places. Roomy, safety-treaded 
step. Enamel trim in decorator colors. 

CLEARANCE 
PRICED 




REG. 
$6.55 






% 2A 






100% STAINLESS 
STEEL 

ADJUSTS TO ALL 
SIZES OF POTS 



a 



»»'•'■' 






' 



American 
Hardware 



1*1 



.••j.i.i,', 

z •• * • « > • 



•V»*' 









w&vg 






*&/* 



Get a VITA-SAVER 

STEAMER— your clue 

to better nutritionl 

Hove better health than ever— with better tasting 
food too! Steamed fresh vegetables and fish are 
delicious and natural tasting, and you can maintain 
a balanced diet by retaining vitamins and minerals. ' 
Time-saving, efficient; prevents burning food. 



I 



r™* t 



50777/1 




50778/6 



Teflon II®coated 
10" FRY PANS 

No-stick cooking, no-scour cleanup! Per- 
mits use of metal kitchen tools. Strong 
aluminum. Heatproof handle. 

CLEARANCE 
PRICED 




REG. $2.95 




50780.6 



Bake out facts 
with TUBED 
CAKE PANS 

Right size for ready-mix or home recipes. 
Batter-seal, loose bottom for easy remov- 
al. Convenient cooling legs. 1 0" x AV*" . 

CLEARANCE 
PRICED 




REG. $2.35 




co\7TP) 



50779/6 




2j -QT. TEA KETTLES 
blow the whistle! 



CLEARANCE 
PRICED 

Flip-cap tea kettle 
that whistles when 
water boils! Pol- 
ished finish with 
flat, burner-fitted 
bottom. Heat-proof 
plastic handle. 






50789, 1 



Self -Buttering 
CORN POPPERS 

Put butter into special compart- 
ment in top. As heat pops pop- 
corn, butter melts over it. Shuts 
off automatically. Top doubles 
as serving bowl. Makes 4 qts. 

CLEARANCE PRICED 




50786, I 




97 




REG. $13.50 



Breathe easier 
with 1 -GALLON 
VAPORIZERS 

Operates 8-10 hours, then shuts 
off automatically. Triple-wall 
core keeps temp, below 1 30° 
Medicant well, lock-on head. 

CLEARANCE PRICED 







American 
Hardware 

STORES 



50785 



G.E. ELECTRIC 
ALARM CLOCKS 
will wake you 
to clues. 

A compact basic alarm clock that 
fits on the smallest night stand. 
Easy-read dial and hands, sweep 
second hand and alarm set hand. 

CLEARANCE PRICED 



PANASONIC MINI AM 
RADIOS tune you 
in to the latest 
details! 




50781-4/1 



Rugged high 
impact case in 
"crazy colors". 
Built-in antenna. 
2 1 //' speaker. 
With batteries, 
earphone, 
carrying strap. 




Easy to clean brushed 
chrome top, white 
enameled body. Com- 
pact 8" x 8" x A". 
Continuous heat; 
cord attached. 
2-B JRNER STOVES with individual 
Hi-Med-Lo Switches, Reg. $14.75 




50788/1 







It's an open 
& shut case: 
Quality 
BRAND 
NAME 

merchandise 
at LOW 
CLEARANCE 
PRICES is 
STORE-WIDE 
... but WHO 
NE IT? 



I • 




Combination SUN AND HEAT 
IAMPS with TIMER 



7777 



Quartz lamp for brown- 
er tan, 2 infra-red heat 
elements provide heat 
during tanning treat- 
ment, or choose heat 
only to soothe sore 
muscles. Sun-shaped 
reflector gives an 
even tan. With goggles, 
detailed instructions. 




ore/co 



50791 , 




Light up the mystery 
with DESK LAMPS! 



Decorative and function- 
al styling in handsome 
black and white lamp. 
17V2"H..Max. wattage 
200 watts. Accommodates 
most bulb sizes. 




50792/33 



LIGHT 

BULBS keep 
the lights on 

Handy 6-pack of inside frost 
bulbs. Contains 2 each 60 
watt, 75 watt, 100 watt bulbs. 




D-GELL BATTERIES 




Use in flash- 
lights, toys, 
more! Made 
in U.S.A. 
CLEARANCE PRICED 



American 
Hardware 



BRAND 



50794/48 



8/1 

EVEREADY ALKALINE IT 7 
BATTERIES, PAK OF | J/ 
2, REG. $2.00, NOW - 



00 

REG. 19« 
EACH 



50793 6 



EVEREADY 



COMMANDER 
FLASHLIGHTS 

shine on the 
evidence 

Positive action switch. 
Lustrous chrome finish case. 
With 2 "D" batteries. 




I say, Goliath, 
do we have to 
investigate ALL 
2,000 American 
Hardware Stores 
to find out 
WHO DONE IT? 



American 
Hardware 

STORMS 

BRAND 



ftOrS , 



_ I AMERICAN 
kSJSTANDARD 

CHURCH 

'HI l| St Sf «' IN IMf HOUSI • 



50796,7,9-803/1 



£ 






ft 



50804/6 









V 



/ 



'tit** 



American 
Hardware 

STORES 

BRAND 



50805/ 1 2 



mfA « 4> 



Our American 
WOOD TOILET SEATS 



Neat, modern wide- 
back styling with 
all-plastic hinges. 
Durable, high-lustre 
finish is easy to 
clean. Won't crack 
or split. White. 



CLEARANCE PRICED 



REG. 
$4.49 



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19th 
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Thomas Crane Public Library 

Box 379 , rt0 .£ Q 

quincy, Mass. 02169 



O-iiiKl 


rT^ar^^^"^* 






.jny %*** m 


r® 


Vol. 6 No. 19 *"1^ 


2ui«c<fi 0*m K/eeiUt 'Hem*^«./kfi 




Thursday, January 24, 1974 




^%&m. 



In Wake Of Germantown Attack 

Officials, Tenants 
Hotly Clash Over 
Banning Of Dogs 

By TOM HENSHAW 

A long-simmering dispute over man's best friend is erupting to a climax 
Germantown housing projects in the wake of a disfiguring attack by either one 
dogs on 5-year-old Tammy Stuart. 

The question being asked --and answered pro and con- is an old one around the 
Housing Authority's Snug Harbor and Riverview projects. It is this: 

Should residents of the projects be allowed to keep dogs as pets'.' 



in the 

or two 

Quincy 



"We have no objection to pets 
per se," says Clement A. 
O'Brien, executive director of 
the Quincy Housing Authority. 
"Bd we feel responsible for the 
safety of the residents. The 
number of dogs there is a 
definite danger." 

"We are very sorry for the 
Stuart child," says James St. 
Angelo. president of the 
Harborview Residents 
Association. "But we don't feel 
that responsible tenants should 
be punished for the actions of 
one or two dogs. 

"This incident is what the 
Housing Authority has been 



SEE EDITORIAL 
ON PAGE 4 



waiting for to try to get a dog 
ban clause into our leases. What 
would happen if it happened 
down the street, outside the 
project? Would they ban dogs 
from all Germantown? 

Right in the middle of it is 
City Dog Officer Frank 
Berlucchi. 

"There are too many dogs 
running loose there," he says. 
"But it isn't the dogs. It's how 
do you get the people who own 



them to accept the responsibility 
of controlling them. There is 
little control by the owners." 

And if you want evidence that 
people don't really care about 
their dogs, Berlucchi will tell 
you that 41 dogs were 
impounded" from the project in 
1973 and only 15 of them were 
reclaimed and licensed. 

Tammy, daughter of Mr. and 

Mrs. William Stuart of 31 

Binnacle Lane, Snug Harbor, was 

bitten in the face Saturday [Jan. 

19]. Part of her upper lip was 

torn away. She faces plastic 

surserv 

|Cont'donPage2| 



'A Sad Situation' 

Lydon Seeks Conflict Ruling 
In Council Cemetery Probe 



Two of Quincy's most 
popular recent political 
diversions popped up in tandem 
at the City Council meeting 
Monday night - the probe of the 
Cemetery Department and a 
suggestion of conflict of interest. 

The Council voted to make 
the Oversight Committee, whose 
five members have been 
conducting the investigation of 
the Cemetery Department, a 
committee of the whole council. 

The vote was'a narrow 6-0 -- a 



two thirds vote was needed - 
with Councillor Clifford H. 
Marshall Jr. out sick, 
Councillor-elect James A. Sheets 
voteless and Councillor John J. 
Lydon Jr. abstaining. 

Lydon, a Wollaston funeral 
director, said he feared a conflict 
of interest if he served on the 
Oversight Committee while it 
probed the Cemetery 
Department. He has asked City 
Solicitor Richard McCormick for 
a ruling. 



Lydon said in a statement 
Tuesday that Ins funeral home 
sometimes makes direct 
payments of money to the city 
for families temporarily unable 
to pay for graves and that he 
personally contributes to the 
Cemetery employees Christmas 
fund. 

"It is a sad situation," he said, 
"when a City Councillor has a 
concern of minority groups in 
[Cont'd on Page 2| 



Mrs. Quinn Pretty Quincy Campaigner But- 




GRAMP'S DAY - Richard Pragnell, 11 and Kenneth Johnson, 5, are 
proud of their grandfather. Rev. Chester A. Porteus who was 
honored at Christ Episcopal Church Sunday. Rev. Porteus, who 
retired as rector after 29 years service, is still chaplain of the Quincy 
Fire Department. Firefighters drove him to the service and reception 
on a ladder truck. 

[Quincy Sun Photo by Laban Whittaker] 



Public Hearing Feb. 25 
On 10-Story Height Limit 



The City Council will hold a 
public hearing Feb. 25 at 7:45 
p.m. in the Council Chambers on 
a proposed amendment to the 
Zoning Ordinances which would 
limit the height of buildings in 
Quincy to 10 stories. 

The hearing was requested by 



the Quincy Citizens Association 
"to afford concerned citizens of 
Quincy the right to be heard on 
this issue before taking final 
action." 



The city presently has 
height limitation. 



no 



City Census Starts Feb. 1 



Quincy will start counting its 
adult citizens on Feb. I. 

About 70 census takers will 
be trudging the city on that day 
jotting down vital statistics on 
all residents 17 years old and 
over. 

The count will be used as a 
basis for such things as voting 
lists, tax abatements, veterans 
pensions, and student loans. 

Assistant City Clerk Thomas 
R. Burke said each census taker 



will be equipped with credentials 
identifying him as such. 

The census is expected to take 
about 2Vi weeks, depending on 
the weather, Burke said. 

Last year, the census takers 
counted 66,549 residents, 17 
years and older, in Quincy. 

This time, said Burke, there'll 
probably be more since several 
housing projects have filled up in 
the past year. 



She's 'Not At Liberty' To Say Husband A Candidate 



The lady looked the 
questioner straight in the eye 
and smiled sweetly and said: 

"I'm not at liberty to say 
that my husband is running 
for governor." 

The lady was Mrs. Robert 
Quinn, a tall, striking 
brunette who is the wife of 
an attorney general who 
would like to trade the job in 
for something better, like, 
say, governor. 

Mrs. Quinn and her oldest 
daughter, Andrea, 13, 
dropped around to the 
Quincy Sun the other day to . 
. . to . . . well, just what was 
she doing? 

"Bob can't get 
everyplace," she said. "I like 
to do my part in his efforts to 
... to get where he can't get 
to. When he's at the office' 



doing something else,- I go 
where I can." 

They had been on the road 
[call it campaign trail] since 
9 a.m., visiting hot lunch 
programs and attending a 
coffee hour organized by one 
of her friends in Quincy. 

"Today is a short day," she 
said, almost apologetically. 
"We'll be back home by 2 
o'clock." 

A long day in the Quinn 
lexicon is something like 10 
a.m. to 10 p.m. and so far she 
hasn't had any of them in 
1974. 

"But they tell me I'm 
going to," she laughed. 

"Actually, I like it. I find it 
very exciting to meet people. 
No matter where you go, no 
matter how many times 
you've done something, 
there's always something 
new, always something 



interesting. 

"There's a lot of 
aggravation, too, of course. 
But the things that get to you 
during a campaign are the 
things that are going to get to 
you anyway. And I enjoy 
meeting people." 

She campaigned for the 
first time, not for Quinn, but 
for one of his friends who 
was running for mayor of 
Boston. 

[That would be the John 
Collins-John Powers race in 
1959 but she didn't say 
which one was the friend and 
the bedazzled interviewers 
forgot to ask her.] 

Hers was a highly 
specialized job -- she spoke 
Italian. 

"I had just come back 
from a year at the University 
of Rome. We went around to 
[Cont'd on Page 41 




VISITORS - Mrs. Robert Quinn, wife of the state attorney 
general, and her daughter Andrea, 13, examine a page of the 
Quincy Sun during visit to the Sun's Quincy Center offices. Ms. 
Muriel Lyon of the Sun staff holds the page. 

[Quincy Sun Photo by Laban Whittaker] 



Page 2 Quincy Sun Thursday, January 24, 1974 



Officials, Tenants Clash Over Banning Of Dogs 



[Cont'd from Page 1 1 by the stuarts, the other by a 

Two dogs, one of them owned neighbor, were impounded and 




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sent to the Animal Rescue 
League in Boston to be disposed 
of. 

The police report of the 
incident said it could not be 
determined which dog bit 
Tammy but Mrs. Stuart quoted 
her daughter as saying the 
neighbor's dog attacked her and 
the Stuart dog went to her aid. 
Donald Solane, who was 
present but did not witness the 
attack, said he heard two dogs 
snarl and turned to see Tammy 
on the ground and the two 
animals with their faces in her 
face. 

Until last July, dogs were 
banned from the projects by 
Quincy Housing Authority edict. 
Then Mrs. Theresa Martin, 
fighting an eviction notice for 
refusing to give up her dog, 
appealed to the State 
Department of Community 
Affairs which overruled the 
unilateral prohibition of pets. 

Since that time, says the 
QHA's O'Brien, "there is no 
question that there are more 
dogs in the projects. The 
complaints of annoyance and 
danger have been tremendous. 
By spring the number of dogs 
will be horrendous." 

Dog Officer Berlucchi 
estimates that there are 250 dogs 
in the projects. 

"Ridiculous," says St. Angelo. 
"We took a survey of our own 
and in the 52 apartments in my 
area of Riverview there were a 
total of six dogs, all of them 
small, ranging from chihuahuas 
to terriers. I have one of them. 
By Housing Authority figures, 
there are 580 families living in 
the Snug Harbor and Riverview 
projects, about 2,270 people, 
880 of them adults and the rest 
children. Snug Harbor School, 
with 762 pupils, is by far the 
largest elementary school in the 
city. 

Right now, the Harborview 



Residents Association and the 
QHA are negotiating a new 
model lease and one of the 
stumbling blocks is the QHA's 
insistence on a "no dog" clause 
that would supersede the DCA's 
ruling. 

"The DCA's model lease 
permits pets unless we can prove 
that they are a nuisance or 
dangerous," says O'Brien. "But 
how do we prove that they are 
dangerous until they bite 
someone? 

"A girl can be disfigured for 
life and the most we can do is 
make the tenant get rid of that 
particular dog. Then the tenant 
can go out and get a new dog 
and it goes on and on and on." 
To St. Angelo and the 
Harborview Residents 
Association a dog ban is an 
infringement on the rights of 
people - many of them 
low-income -- who live in public 
housing. 

"I know it sounds hard and 
we do feel sorry for the 
youngster but there will be 
incidents no matter where you 
live," says St. Angelo. "If a kid 
wants a dog, what makes kids in 
projects different from kids in 
other parts of town." 

Quincy has had a leash law 
since Nov. 23, 1966 which says: 
"No person who owns or keeps a 
dog shall allow the animal to run 
free when not restricted to the 
premises of said owner or 
keeper. When off said premises 
such dogs shall be leashed and/or 
curbed." 

"The dog officer works on 
this steadily," says Police Lt. 
Arthur Shea, administrative 
assistant to Chief Francis X. 
Finn. "There is not enough 
room in the dog pound to pick 
up all the dogs." 

Since the Stuart incident, 
police have stepped up their 
drive on nuisance dogs and 
members of the K-9 Corps have 



been assigned to help Berlucchi 
on Fridays from 1 to 5 p.m., 
Sundays from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. 
and Thursdays from 12 to 4 
p.m. 

The Harborview Residents 
Association doesn't think 
Berlucchi has been enforcing the 
leash law very well at all. 

"The whole thing rests on 
Berlucchi," says St. Angelo. "If 
he was doing his job the chances 
would be less of something like 
this happening. The dog should 
have been picked up long ago. 

"Berlucchi never would come 
down here when we complained 
to him. He said the Housing 
Authority told him not to come 
down. O'Brien said he never told 
him. Who do you believe?" 

Berlucchi feels the problem 
goes beyond the leash law in the 
projects. It's one of congestion - 
too many people and too many 
dogs trying to occupy too little 
space. 

"Say you've got four families 
with eight children living under 
one roof," he says. "Two of 
them have pet dogs and they put 
them out in the yard. One of 
them has a bone or some other 
goodie. One of the eight kids 
tries to remove the goodie. What 
happens? 

"Who gets the yard, the dogs 
or the kids?" 

Berlucchi reported to the 
Housing Authority last summer 
that "in less than one year there 
will be a serious accident [in the 
Germantown projects] due to 
the dog population in this area." 
"You can't take dogs and tie 
them up in the backyard when 
you have five or six kids in the 
same house," he says. "Kids 
can't walk past a dog without 
doing something to him, petting 
him, teasing him. 

"More people have to realize 
the great responsibility they 
have to love and keep an 
animal." 



Lydon Seeks Conflict Ruling 



(Cont'd from Page 1] 

the City bringing law suits left 
and right. 

"As I viewed my colleague, 
Mr. Sheets, at the Council 
meeting last night, I could not 
help but feel that if conflict 
exists in my circumstances, that 
same situation could befall me." 

Sheets has declined to take 
the oath of office until it. is 
decided whether his two jobs as 
Councillor and instructor at 
Quincy Junior College are a 
conflict of interest as charged by 



NOTICE 

to the Residents of the 

City of Quincy 

The annual listing of ALL 
residents of the city, Seventeen 
years of age and over will begin 
On Friday, February 1, 1974 
CENSUS TAKERS WILL CARRY PROPER IDENTIFICATION 

Par Order 

JOHN M GILDS 
City Clark 

At required by Generel laws, Chapter 51. Section 4 



a group of 10 unidentified 
taxpayers. 

The vote on the Oversight 
Committee had its unexpected 
aspects. 

It was moved by Councillor 
Warren A. Powers and seconded 
by Councillor Joseph J. LaRaia, 
who has opposed the motion in 
the past. And he voted for it 
when only his vote was needed 
to send it down to defeat. 

Then LaRaia, answering a 
charge that his original call for a 
Council probe of the Cemetery 
Department was "ill advised," 
said he has evidence that five 
grave lots were resold by the 
Cemetery Department without 
permission of the owners. 

He said he would provide 



further details at the next 
meeting of the Oversight 
Committee. The date has not 
been set. 

The probe of the Cemetery 
Department was begun last year 
after the resignation of Supt. 
Anthony M. Famigletti 
following reports that he buried 
relatives in Mt. Wollaston 
Cemetery without paying for the 
lots. 

Famigletti has since made 
restitution of $754. 

LaRaia said he made his 
disclosures. Monday night 
because he was "tired of 
accusations that the Oversight 
Committee was meaningless or 
useless and a waste of the 
taxpayers money." 



McW alter On Atlantic Patrol 



Coast Guard Seaman David B. 
McWalter. son of Mr. and Mrs. 
Harry P. McWalter of 738 Sea 
St., Quincy, is on Atlantic 
fisheries patrol off the New 
England coast aboard, the Coast 



Guard Cutter Sherman. 

Sixteen nations have signed 
agreements to protect Northwest 
Atlantic fish species, McWalter is 
helping enforce the provisions of 
the various pacts. ' 



NOW OPEN 

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Germantown - Merry mount 

COURTEOUS SERVICE 
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Court Briefs Due Today 



Thursday, January 24, 1974 Quincy Sun Page 3 



Sheets May Know By Feb. 1 If He's In Or Out 



James A. Sheets may know 
for sure by Feb. 1 whether or 
not he is to be the City 
Councillor from Ward 4. 

Sheets, elected but unsworn, 
asked Suffolk Superior Court 
Friday to rule on suggestions 
that he would be in conflict of 
interest if he accepted two 
salaries from the city. 

Sheets receives $16,000 as 
head of the government 
department at Quincy Junior 
College and would receive 
$3,000 as city councillor. He has 
offered to serve on the council 
without pay. 

Suffolk Superior Court, which 
received the case from crowded 
Norfolk Superior Court's 
calendar, ordered that briefs be 
submitted by today [Thursday], 
A decision is possible in a week. 

Sheets' eligibility to serve was 
questioned by Atty. Frank W. 
Cormack of North Quincy, who 
says he represents 10 
unidentified taxpayers. But he 
has taken no legal action to 
prevent Sheets from taking his 
seat. 

Sheets declined to take the 
oath of office Jan. 7 lest it 
jeopardize his salary from the 
college. He has been 
participating in Council meetings 
but not voting. 

Meanwhile, a group of Sheets 
supporters, many of them his 
students, have revived the Youth 
for Jim Sheets Committee to 
raise money to help defray the 
costs for pursuing his seat 



through the courts. 

Ron Kaufman, who was 
Sheets' campaign manager, said 
Tuesday about $200 has been 
raised through contributions to 
Box 859 at the Quincy Post 
Office. 

The Youth for Jim Sheets 
Committee held a news 
conference Friday in their old 
campaign headquarters in the 
cellar of the Sheets home at 926 
Furnace Brook Parkway to 
"reaffirm our beliefs in Jim's 
integrity". 

Sheets, they said in a 
statement, "has been given a 
mandate by the people of Ward 
4 to represent them as their 
councillor and it is his wish, as 
well as ours, to be allowed to 
fulfill this mandate. 

"From our headquarters here 
to the streets - through. many 
weeks of intensive campaigning 
-- we have gained valuable 
experience and renewed faith in 
the electoral system. 

"We feel that this present 
challenge has not dampened our 
enthusiasms or ideals, nor have 
they been in vain; but rather, we 
now feel that we have been 
tempered with constructive 
realisms. 

"We are not bitter, but 
admittedly, we are disappointed 

The group announced that 
they will hold a family-style 
dinner Feb. 24 as one function 
in their fund-raising plans. They 
said they will also distribute 
bumper stickers. 



Sterling Meeting Tonight 




AMITY AIDES from Europe and Latin America hold their first meeting with Ellis J. Swartz, supervisor 
of the program and Coordinator of Foreign Languages for Quincy Public Schools. Left to right, seated, 
Esther Oettli of Switzerland, Ruth Nohl of Switzerland, Hilda Jimenez of Mexico, Swartz, Fresia de 
Vidaurre of Bolivia, Hector Aprile of Uruguay, Jean-Pierre Genet of France; standing, Marie-Pascale Gru 
of France, Pierre-Alaine De Chalus of France, Maria D'Arcangelo and Margaret Crowley, co-chairmen of 
the program; and Mrs. Inez Silverstein, chairman of the host families. 

[Quincy Sun Photo by Laban Whittaker] 

City Hall To Be Open 2 Nights A Month 



The re-scheduled meeting of 
parents interested in organizing a 
Sterling Junior High Parents' 
Advisory Council will be held 



tonight [Thursday) at 7:30 p.m. 
in the Sterling Junior High 
Media Center. 



If you can't get to City Hall 
during regular daytime hours to 
conduct business, you will now 
have a chance two evenings a 
month, starting Feb. 4. 

Mayor Walter J. Hannoh 
announced plans this week to 
open City Hall evenings the first 
and third Mondays of each 
month, from 6 p.m. to 9 p.m. 

Municipal offices open those 



evenings will be the City Clerk's, 
Treasurer's, Tax Collector's and 
Assessors'. 

Hours of these offices 
currently are from 8:30 a.m. to 
4:30 p.m. daily from Monday to 
Friday. 

The evening hours on the first 
and third Mondays will coincide 
with the City Council meetings 
which are regularly scheduled 
then. 



"Many residents work during 
the day and don't have a chance 
to get to City Hall before its 
4:30 p.m. closing," Mayor 
Hannon said. "These additional 
hours will give them an 
opportunity to seek 
information, pay bills, and 
conduct any business which they 
ordinarily might not be able to 
do during the day." 



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Page 4 Quincy Sun Thursday, January 24, 1974 

Editorials 



Dogs: Pets Or Pests? 

A five-year old girl has been savagely attacked by a dog at one of 
the Germantown public housing facilities. She may be disfigured for 
life. 

Photos were taken of the young victim. Those who view them 
quickly turn their heads. 

The Quincy Housing Authority would like to ban pets in the 
city's public housing. Dr. Alfred Mahoney, city health commissioner, 
is on record as opposing pets in public housing as a potential health 
hazard. ' 

The Harborview Residents Association which represents tenants at 
the Rivcrview and Snug Harbor housing projects are against such a 
ban. 

They contend that all the dog owners in the housing projects 
should not be penalized because of the attack on the little girl. 

The state Department of Community Affairs in the past has told 
the QHA that it cannot unilaterally ban pets from the projects. The 
DCA says such a step has to be negotiated with the tenants as a lease 
clause. 

We are not against dogs. They make nice, loveable pets for many 
people who take care of them, feed them, keep them from annoying 
neighbors, etc. 

But dogs can get to be a nuisance if the owner doesn't care where 
the dog goes or what the dog does. Anyone who has tried to sleep at 
night with one howling at the moon from under his window will 
agree with that. So will the neighbor who has to clean up souvenirs 
left on his lawn, etc. 

The Snug Harbor and Riverview projects house 580 families. It is 
a high density population. 

Until the DCA told the QHA it could not ban dogs without 
negotiation, the latter had the pet situation pretty well under 
control. 

Now there is no restriction. And there are more dogs. And there 
will be more dogs. 

And. we fear, there could be more incidents like this recent 
attack. 

One immediate reaction to all of this might be: people who live 
close together in public housing and at public subsidized low rents 
should yield a privilege or two. Like not having pets. 

Maybe that would be too harsh a measure. But it would solve the 
problem. 

But we have a question: 

What about our dog-leash law? Quincy, like many other 
communities has one. But it is not enforced very strongly. 

We think that if the tenants insist on having pets, then they [and 
other residents] should abide by the law. If their dog goes wandering 
off. he should be scooped up and the owner prosecuted. 

As we say , dogs can be great pets. But they can also be great pests. 
They should be kept under control-especially in housing facilities 
where there are many people living together in a relatively small 
area. 

We have to agree with Rev. Peter Corea. QHA member who pretty 
well summed it all up: "All the dogs in Germantown aren't worth 
this child's life." 

Except we might amend that to read, "all the dogs in Quincy 
aren't worth this child's life." 

The Mysterious 10 

The question of whether or not James Sheets would be in conflict 
if he serves as a City Councillor while employed as a professor at 
Quincy Junior College is an interesting one. 

He might be in conflict. Then again, he might not. The court has 
been asked to make a ruling. 

But as it turns out, it is Mr. Sheets himself and not the reported. 
10 taxpayers raising the question who has gone into court to seek 
that opinion. 

A Quincy attorney, Frank W. Cormack, says he represents the 10 
taxpayers who at this writing are still the big mystery in Quincy. 

Their allegation that Mr. Sheets would be in conflict if he serves 
simultaneously as a city councilloi and a professor at the city 
operated Quincy Junior College is a valid point for debate. They 
could be right. They could be wrong. 

But why are the 10 still cloaked in anonymity? The fact that they 
have not been identified now has some people, even wondering if 
they really do exist. 

In raising a legal question, they have nothing to be ashamed of. 
They have the right to raise that question. 

But when they decline to reveal themselves, it has some 
wondering if the move is not just politically motivated. 

Why, for example, wasn't this question raised when Mr. Sheets 
announced his candidacy some months ago. Why wasn't it raised 
when he won a nomination? Why was it delayed until just before he 
was to take his oath? 

At that time City Solicitor Richard McCormick was informed that 
the 10 taxpayers were raising the conflict question. And there were 
indications that a taxpayers suit would be filed and an injunction 
sought to prevent Sheets from taking his oath. 

Instead, Mr. Sheets himself declined to take the oath. 

At this writing, as far as the 10 phantom taxpayers are concerned, 
they have actually only threatened a suit. They haven't gone through 
with it. 

But because of that threat, Mr. Sheets has not taken his oath, 
cannot vote on matters pertaining to his constituents, and now at 
legal expense, has taken the matter into court himself. 

"I believe for the good of the entire city, the matter should be 
clarified," he says. We agree. 

But we also believe in fair play, too. We think Mr. Sheets and the 
entire city have a right to know wjio the 10 are. 
Isn't it about time they stood up to be counted? 



Attorney General's Wife Campaigns 



(Cont'd from Page 1 1 . 
some Italian areas, ringing 
doorbells. That was my first 
campaign, running up and 
down stairs ringing doorbells 
and speaking Italian." 

The Quinn's have four 
children, Andrea, 13, 
Michael, 12, Elena, "almost 
10", and the baby, 2, and the 
feeling is strong that if she 
wasn't married to a rising 
young pol she'd like nothing 
better than to be home with 
them. 

"I do my best by helping 
him," she said. "That's what 



marriage is all about." 

Is she happy taking second 
place to her husband? 

"It's not second place," 
she said, bristling prettily. "I 
don't think Bob puts me in 
second place. But I don't see 
any point in my having a 
career. We'd be arguing all the 
time which job is most 
important. 

"I think his job is most 
important and I'll do all I can 
to help him." 

So much for women's lib. 

Mrs. Quinn did admit, 
though, that she once 



entertained ambitions ot 
being a ballerina. 

"But I grew too tall," she 
said. 

What kind of a first lady ot 
the Commonwealth would 
she like to be? 

"I haven't thought of that 
yet," she said. "One step at a 
time, please. I don't like to 
presume until we're in." 

In what? 

The lady smiled sweetly. 

"I'm not at liberty to say 
that my husband is running 
for governor," she said. 



Marshall Will Announce For Sheriff 



Rep. Clifford H. Marshall 
[D-Quincyl will officially 
announce his candidacy for the 
office of Sheriff of Norfolk 
County at a public reception to 
be held Sunday afternoon, at 
The Lantana, Randolph. 

"I am fully cognizant of the 
tremendous challenge that must 
be met in the coming years in 
the area of law enforcement and 
I feel that with diligence, 
perseverance and the help of a 
concerned citizenry, I can and 
will meet that challenge," 
Marshall said. 

Marshall is presently assistant 
majority leader and is serving his 
third term in the Massachusetts 
General Court, currently a 
member of the Vital Rules and 
Counties Committees. He is a 
member of the special 
commission to study human 
development and conditions in 
the Massachusetts Correctional 
System, the National Legislative 
Conference on law enforcement 
and criminal justice, the Eastern 
Regional Committee on law 
enforcement and criminal 
justice, the Special Commission 



on state aid to cities and towns 
for the prevention of juvenile 
deliquency, and has served on 
the commission to re-organize 
the department of youth 
services. 

He is the author of several 
legislative acts involving the 
Massachusetts Correctional 
system, more specifically, 
providing for scholarships for 
children of correctional 
personnel killed in the 
performance of their duty, the 
provision of pensions for widows 
and children of correctional 
personnel killed in the line of 
duty. He was also the sponsor of 
legislation making it a crime and 
providing punishment for 
escaping while on furlough from 
the Massachusetts Correctional 
system. 

During the recent 
re-organization of the Youth 
Service Board, Marshall 
sponsored two amendments 
providing for mandatory 
in-service training programs in 
the Department of Youth 
Services and the creation of a 
Bureau of Educational Services 



which establishes an avenue ot 
rehabilitation and education for 
youthful offenders. He has been 
a guest lecturer at Suffolk 
University on delinquency and 
.corrections. 

Marshall has served as a 
Quincy city councillor since 
1966 and is also the elected 
Democratic State 
Committeeman from Quincy, 
Braintree and Holbrook. 

Marshall, a veteran, served 
four years in the Marine Corps 
on active duty with the National 
Security Agency. He is active in 
civic, charitable and fraternal 
organizations including: The 
Norfolk County Sheriff's 
Association, Elks, Sons of Italy, 
Knights of Columbus, 
Massachusetts Legislators 
Association, and is a member of 
the Board of Directors of the 
Massachusetts Heart Association. 
He has been recognized by 
Who's Who in American 
Government in 1973. 

He is married to the former 
Louise M. Caporale of Quincy 
and is the father of four sons. 
The family lives at 64 Edison 
St., Quincy. 



Hannon To Discuss Quincy Growth At N.H. 



Mayor Walter J. Hannon will 
be the main speaker at the 
annual dinner of the Downtown 
Manchester Association 
Wednesday, Jan. 30, in 
Manchester. N.H. 

The Mayor has been invited 
by the association, a group of 
Manchester retailers, to speak of 
Quincy's growth and 



development, particularly as it 
pertains to the downtown 
business district. 

Mayor Hannon will include in 
his presentation a slide show on 
Quincy's history and 
development as it directly relates 
to the economic growth of the 
downtown area. 



"Manchester shares with 
Quincy similar problems in their 
attempts to revitalize the 
downtown business district," 
Hannon said. "We welcome this 
opportunity to meet with the 
Association to show them how 
Quincy has progressed and 
exchange ideas on the future 
plans of both cities." 



County Regional Waste Study Review Tonight 



A meeting of the Norfolk 
County Regional Solid Waste 
Disposal Study Committee will 
be held tonight [Thursday) at 
7:30 p.m. in the Superior Court 
Building, 650 High St., Dedham. 

Officials of all towns and 
interested citizens are invited to 
attend. 

Commissioner George B. 



McDonald, of Quincy, organizer 
of the group, said the recently 
completed report from their 
consulting engineers will be 
reviewed by the committee 
preparatory to presenting the 
plan to the municipalities. 

The committee has been 
meeting regularly since its 
inception nearly four years ago 



when Norfolk led the way in 
seeking solutions to this pressing 
problem on a regional basis. 

McDonald said, "We must 
have alternatives for our 
municipalities before another 
crisis is upon us." 

For most towns, he added, 
the time is not far off. 



Patrick Rinella Receives Commendation 



Navy Electrician's Mate Third 
Class Patrick Rinella, son of Mr. 
and Mrs. Anthony P. Rinella of 
99 Taffrail Rd, Germantown, 
was commended as a 

• Historic 
Moments 

CHURCHILL DIES 

Sir Winston Churchill died 
at age 90 on Jan. 24, 1965. 

SOLDIER POUND 

On Jan. 24, 1972, Japanese 
army Sgt. Shoichi Yokoi was 
found in jungles of Guam 
where he had hidden since 
World War n. 

HOOVER REQUEST 

On Jan. 26, 1918, Food Ad- 
ministrator Herbert Hoover 
asked Americans to save 
meats and grain by observing 
voluntary meatless, grainless 
days. 



crewmember of the guided 
missile light cruiser USS Little 
Rock for his efforts as part of 
the U.S. Sixth Fleet task force in 
the Mediterranean during the 



latest Middle East crisis. 

A 1970 graduate of Quincy 
Vocational High School, he 
joined the Navy in January 
1971. 






Published weekly on Thursday by 

The Quincy Sun Publishing Company 

1601 Hancock St., Quincy, Massachusetts 02169 

Publisher and Editor 

Henry W. Bosworth, Jr. 

Advertising Director 

John B. Powers 

10tf Per Copy - $3.50 Per Year - Out of State $4.50 Per Year 

Telephone: 471-3100 471-3101 471-3102 

Second-Class Postage Paid at Boston, Mass. 

MEMBER NEW ENGLAND PRESS ASSOCIATION 

tvn The . Quincy Sun a«"rnes no financial responsibility for 
typographical errors in advertisements but will reprint that part of 
_an advertuement in which the typographical error occurs. 



Sunbeams 



By HENRY BOSWORTH 

Robert Quinn 9 s Wife 
A Real Campaign Charmer 

Mrs. Robert Quinn, wife of the attorney general, stopped by the 
Quincy Sun office last week for a visit and chat. 

She's off unofficially campaigning for her husband who is an 
unofficial candidate for governor. But everybody knows he's 
running, and will soon make it official. 

He's got quite a campaign asset in the little woman. Only she's not 
so little. She's a statuesque beauty. [5-10] 

"1 wanted to be a ballerina," she smiled. "But I got too tall." 

She's a charmer. Real down to earth. 

Reminds you of a tall version of Jackie Kennedy only friendlier 
and easier to talk with. She's got female charisma-plus. 

If Bob Quinn is smart [he is] he'll keep her on the campaign trail 
from now until election day. She's good for a few thousand votes all 
by herself. 

WITH WOMEN'S LIB on the march maybe someday we might 
even see a female major league baseball munager. [O.K. men, stop 
laughing] . 

There are women who know as much--if not more-about baseball 
than some men. Including, it would seem, some major league 
baseball executives. 

Take Bernice Murphy of Everett St., Wollaston, for example. Back 
in 1956 she wrote a letter to an old friend of ours, former sports 
columnist Pres Hobson. The subject was the hitting ability [rather 
lack of it] of pitchers. She wrote, in part: 

"I realize that a team can replace a weak hitting fielder but a good 
pitcher musi be retained, no matter what his batting weakness. 
Therefore, my simple question is why does not baseball allow a 
pinch-hitter for any pitcher at the discretion of the team manager? 

"It would make the game much more interesting, protect the 
pitcher and give the bench a chance. I have often wondered in games 
with a high total of strikeouts, how many of them are the opposing 
pitcher? With a pitcher like Herb Score, in his 16 or 18 per game, the 
four of the opposing pitcher must be of great help in the total!" 

Miss Murphy also sent a letter to Commissioner Ford Flick in 
which she further noted: 

"I think the game would be more interesting and fairer to all 
concerned if a weak hitting pitcher was alkr.ed to rest on the bench 
instead of makiiig him the laughing Stock of the public and the 
killing off of a rally." 

Frick didn't even bother to reply to her. 

Seventeen years later [1973] the American League adopted her 
idea with the Designated Hitter. 

Incidentally, in a note to John McCue, assistant treasurer of the 
Hancock Bank and a long-time friend of her's. Miss Murphy said she 
sent a- copy of the letter to Ken Coleman, "Voice of the Red Sox." 

Coleman in turn showed it to Orlando Cepada, DH Supreme who 
commented: "1 hope she gets the credit she deserves." 

*¥* 
HAT IN RING: Barry T. Hannon of Braintree. Norfolk County 
Register of Deeds, today officially announces his candidacy for 
Attorney General. Announcement scheduled for 10 a.m. in the 
Hawthorne Room of the Parker House Boston. [We reported several 
weeks ajo that he already had bumper stickers in circulation) . 

*¥* 
SUNDAY. : ; the day Rep.-City Councillor Clifford Marshall is 
scheduled to officially announce his candidacy for Norfolk County 
sheriff at The Lantana, Randolph. But at this writing, Marshall is a 
patient at Quincy City Hospital. He hopes to be out to keep his big 
date. 

¥¥ ¥ 

MILESTONE: Rep. Thomas Brownell proudly passing out the 
stogies. Wife, Marge, presented him with a 10-pound son, David 
Thomas, Sunday at St. Margaret's Hospital. Their second child, first 
son. They have a daughter, Karen, 2. 

« ¥¥¥ 

SMILE DEPT: From the Quincy Rotary Club newsletter: via 
Editor Donald Smith: 

On a recent visit to Quincy Hospital, I noticed Harlan Paine 
[hospital director] sitting in the waiting room for expectant fathers. 

"Is your wife here?" I asked. "Not this time," he grinned 
sheepishly. "I just came in for the cigars.'' 



HHHrbisirUjU^ 




You Can Check 

MBTA Service 

By Phone 

The MBTA announces a new 
public information phone will 
provide up-to-date information 
about service conditions. 

By dialing 722-5050 Monday 
through Friday, excluding 
holidays, between 7 a.m. and 
5:30 p.m., the public can receive 
a recorded message telling how 
service is operating on all MBTA 
lines - streetcar, bus, trackless 
trolley, and rapid transit. 

Should there be a delay in 
service, information about the 
incident, alternate transit routes 
and, when possible, an estimate 
of the length of the delay will be 
put on the public information 
phone. 

"When the New England 
weather deals us a blow such as 
she struck last week, the public 
information phone becomes 
vitally important in keeping our 
riders informed of how we are 
faring," said Board Chairman 
John T. Doolittle, Jr. 



Thursday, January 24, 1974 Quincy Sun Page 5 

•Youth Speaks Out 

• The White House has promised to cooperate with the FBI probe - 
does that mean now or after the impeachment? 

• The school year is just about half over - time flies when you're 
having fun. 

• The Tax Collector is helping the gas shortage - he's taking 350 cars 
off the road for non-payment of excise taxes. 

• Most American cars are gas guzzlers which makes it almost 
Un-American to buy an American car. 

•With the price of a date what it is today, being in love means never 
having to say ... I have money. 

• It appears that some "sinister force" has erased the White House 
tapes -- maybe we could hire an exorcist -- it's probably faster than 
impeachment. 

Quincy High School Journalism Class 




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'Sincere Thanks 9 
From Red Cross 

Editor, Quincy Sun: 

The Board of Directors, the 
staff, and the volunteers of the 
Greater Quincy Red Cross 
Chapter are indeed grateful to 
The Quincy Sun for the 
outstanding job of reporting the 
many and varied Red Cross 
services during the past year. 
Your publicizing has made the 
community aware of the Red 
Cross [A United Way Agency]. 

As the Chapter Chairman, I 
personally wish to express my 
sincere thanks and appreciation 
for your wonderful cooperation 
and service. 

Stephen T. Keefe Jr. 
Chapter Chairman 



fc 



For People 
Who Care 



On December 4 the people of Ward 4 gave to James 
Sheets a clear mandate for service. To fulfill this 
mandate the Councillor-elect must now go to the 
courts. This imposes a heavy financial burden. You 
can help by making a contribution to our committee. 



CARING MAKES THE DIFFERENCE 
A SINCERE THANK YOU' FROM 

The Friends of James Sheets Committee 

P.O. Box 859, Quincy 02169 
William Fein, 167 Robertson St., Quincy 






'I've decided to skip today. 



Wouldn't You Like To 
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INCOME TAX 
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NABORHOOD PHARMACY INC., was the first in the city to use a modern 
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With the many types of medical insurance plans offered - your prescription 
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Our records will enable you at any time to produce proper and accurate receipts. 
"Let us do the work for you". In addition, we will mail to you automatically at the 
beginning of the year a complete amount of the money you have spent with us on 
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Page 6 Quincy Sun Thursday, January 24, 1974 

Eleanor Mansfield President 
Baptist Home Auxiliary 



Mrs. Eleanor J. Mansfield of 
Hawthorn Rd, Milton, formerly 
of Quincy, was elected President 
of the Woman's Auxiliary to the 
Baptist Home of Massachusetts, 
at the 83rd annual all-day 
program held at the Home in 
Newton. 

Representatives of nearly 300 
Baptist churches attended the 
event. The Home is one of the 
oldest and largest of its kind in 
the state, and has just dedicated 
a new 74-unit Retirement and 
Residence Center in Kingston, 
Mass. 

Mrs. Mansfield has been a 
member of the Baptist Home 
Auxiliary for 30 years, and a 
member of the Corporate Board 
and Trustee of the Home. She is 
also formerly President of the 
Woman's Baptist Social Union of 
Boston. 

Active at Tremont Temple 
Baptist Church in downtown 
Boston for many years, she has 
twice served as President of the 
Women's Missionary Union, is a 
long-time member of the church 
choir and has served on many 
committees. Her husband, 
Murray N. Mansfield is also a 
long-time member and has 




ELEANOR MANSFIELD 

served as deacon for nearly 
thirty years. Their son, Dean, is 
a member of the church 
executive committee and choir. 
Born in Medford, Mrs. 
Mansfield is a graduate of Colby 
Junior College, New London, 
N.H., class of 1933, where she 
received an associate in music 
degree; and Boston University 
School of Fine & Applied Arts, 
in 1935, where she was awarded 
a Bachelor of Music degree. She 
is a graduate of Quincy High 
School. 



Food Lecture Feb. 14 For 
Squantum Women's Club 



Mrs. Jacqueline Wenz of the 
Boston Gas Consumer 
Information Division will 
present a food lecture entitled, 
"The Cosmopolitan Touch" to 
the Squantum Women's Club 
Feb. 14, at 1:45 p.m. 

The program will be held at 



the First Church of Squantum, 
Huckins Ave. and Bellevue Rd. 

Featured on Mrs. Wenz' menu 
will be Chicken Suzanne, Ham 
Tottles, Lemon Coconut Fancy 
Cake. 

Chairlady is Mrs. John 
Danielson of Quincy. 



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John J. Daniels Jr., 126 Green 
St., Quincy, court officer; 
Cynthia A. Foti, 29 Wampatuck 
Rd, Braintree, senior clerk. 

Joseph J. Dowd Jr., 184 
Atlantic St., Quincy, 
groundsman; Joan R. Allen, 14 
Cedar Rd, Milton, groundsman. 

Kevin D. O'Neill, 57 Edison 
Park, Quincy, clerk; Donna M. 
Delcore, 48 Edison Park, 
Quincy, clerk. 

Michael P. Dorn, 32 Newton 
Ave., Quincy, state police 
officer; Carol A. Bertolon, 96 
Connell St., Quincy, 
bookkeeper. 

Retarded 

Citizens Assn. 

Plans Dance 

The South Shore Association 
for Retarded Citizens will hold 
its 22nd annual Dinner Dance at 
the Sheraton-Tara Hotel, Forbes 
Rd, Braintree, Feb. 2. 

A social hour will start at 7 
p.m. with dinner at 8 p.m 

Ticket chairmen are Mr. and 
Mrs. Robert Poth of Braintree. 

Tickets may be purchased by 
contacting the following town 
chairmen. 

Mr. and Mrs. Victor Melsky, 
Milton; Mr.' and Mrs. Arnold 
Rinkofsky, Milton; Mr. and Mrs. 
Peter Fontana, Weymouth; Mr. 
and Mrs. John Connolly, 
Weymouth; Mr. and Mrs. Alfred 
Burroughs, Hingham; Mr. and 

Mrs. Murray Roberts, Mr. and 
Mrs. Benjamin Landey, Quincy; 
Mr. and Mrs. Steinar Midttun, 
Braintree; Mr. and Mrs. Selden 
Connolly, Braintree and Mr. and 
Mrs. Alexander Sinclair, 
Randolph. 

Dance music will be by Earl 
Hannafin and his orchestra. 



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Karenann Frazer To Be 
Installed By Atlantic Rainbow 



Karenann Frazer, 16, 
daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Donald 
W Fra/er of 145 Standish Rd, 
Squantum, will be installed as 
Worthy Advisor of the Atlantic 
Rainbow Assembly for Girls, 
Friday at 8 p.m. at Atlantic 
Masonic Temple. 

She is a junior at North 
Quincy High School and a 
member of the North Quincy 
High School band and orchestra. 

The installing suite will be: 
Marsha Jean Burnhauser, 
installing officer; Nancy 
chaplain; Gail 
recorder; Debra 
marshall; Judith 
musician; and 
Cheryl LaVoie, soloist. 

Receptionists will be Nancy 
Burnhauser and Carol Sammons. 
Lorelei Barton will be keeper of 
the guest book. 

Other officers to be installed 
are: Cynthia Carlson, Worthy 
Associate advisor; Robin Burns, 
Charity; Sheryl Ann Haskins, 
Hope; Dianne Senter, Faith; 
Kathleen Schaffer, Recorder; 
Pamela Elson, Treasurer; Barbara 
Shalit, Chaplain; and Marsha 
Jean Burnhauser, Drill Leader. 

Linda Tuttle, Love; Nancy 
Senter, Religion; Nancy 
Whitman, Nature; Lydia 
Robinson, Immortality; Cheryl 



Whitman, 
Whitehead, 
Galameaux, 
McConaghy, 




KARENANN FRAZER 

Zuroms, Fidelity; Carol 
Matthews, Patriotism; Christine 
Hunter, Service; Lauren Snook, 
Confidential Observer; Robin 
Patton, Outer Observer; Dianne 
Burrows, Musician; Susan 
Schaffer, Choir Director; and 
Laurel Bumpus, American Flag 
Bearer. 

Choir members are Kathleen 
Doherty, Kathleen Doody, 
Michele Durant, Cheryl Maffie, 
Janet Manson, Lynda Riddle and 
Christine Sullivan. 



Over 300 At Reception 
For Rev., Mrs. Bertil Hult 



Some 335 people, including 
pastors from several South Shore 
churches, attended a reception 
Sunday for Pastor and Mrs. 
Bertil E. Hult, who have retired 
after 20 years service to Salem 
Lutheran Church. 

Gifts, including a color 
portable TV set, were presented 
by Robert Blake, vice president 
of the church, and flowers were 
given to Mrs. Hult by Mrs. Sadie 
Thoren. Harold Hilstrom was 
toastmaster. 

Pastor Hult, a native of 
Sweden, came to the United 
States at the age of Wi and 
settled with his family in 
Jamestown, N.Y. 

He attended the Lutheran 
Bible Institute in Minneapolis, 
where he met his future wife, 
the former Stella Finnesgard. 

He was graduated from 
Gustavus Adolphus College in 
Minnesota and Augustana 
Theological Seminary in Illinois. 

After serving a parish in 



Minot, N.D., for three years, he 
came to Salem Lutheran in 
1954. 

In Quincy, Pastor Hult has 
served as chairman of the 
American Missions Committee 
of the Eastern Massachusetts 
district of the New England 
Synod and director of the Lords 
Day League. 

For several years he was 
secretary of the New England 
Regional Committee of the 
National Lutheran Council and 
chairman of the Chaplaincy 
Committee of the South Shore 
Council of Churches. 

Pastor and Mrs. Hult, who 
have six children and three 
grandchildren, also were foster 
parents to 13 children, including 
Manuel Salgado of Ecuador, the 
first American Field Service 
exchange student at Quincy 
High School. 

The Hults will make their 
retirement home in Wollaston. 



Great Books Group 
To Discuss Macbeth 



Macbeth by Shakespeare will 
be discussed Jan. 30 at 7:30 by 



MR 



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JEWEIERS 

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the members of the first year 
Great Books Discussion Group. 

Mrs. Mary Vallier will lead the 
discussion. The Great Books 
Discussion Group meets at 
Quincy Junior College on 
Coddington St., every other 
week to discuss the classics. 

The general public is cordially 
invited to attend the meetings, 
to participate if they have read 
the book, or to merely observe. 

Those seeking additional 
information about the Great 
Books Discussion Program are 
asked to call Mrs. Vallier at 
479-2408 or Mrs. Constance 
Lawson at 472-5532. 



Quincy Sons Of Italy 
Social Center 

120 Quarry St., Quincy 

Newest function hall now available for weddings, showers, dinner, 
dances. Main [Golden Lion] Suite has cathedral ceiling. Brides 
room - ultra modern sound system. Completely air conditioned. 

EOR RESERVATION CALL 
773-2687 AFTER 2 P.M. 



Thursday, January 24, 1974 Qjtfncy Sun Page 7 




ENGAGED - Mr. and Mrs. Nicholas A. Pepe, of 33 Pembroke St., 
Quincy, announce the engagement of their daughter Valerie E. Pepe 
to Donald J. McNamara. He is the son of Mr. and Mrs. George F. 
McNamara, 26 Judy Lane, Somerset. Miss Pepe is a graduate of 
Archbishop Williams High School, Braintree, and received a B.A. in 
Biology from Emmanuel College. She is employed by the City of 
Quincy. Mr. McNamara is a graduate of Somerset High School and 
received a B.A. in Biology from Providence College. He is a science 
teacher in the Somerset School system. There are no immediate 
wedding plans. 

Naomi Society Elects 
Officers, Plans Banquet 



The Naomi Society of 
Covenant Congregational Church 
elected new officers at its 59th 
annual meeting. 

Elected were: 

Mrs. Robert Day, Mrs. Charles 
Bennett and Mrs. Gladys Bjelf, 
counsellors. Other board 
members are Mrs. Lloyd Allen, 
Mrs. Donald Teed, Mrs. 
MacDonald, Mrs. Warren Hedin, 
Mrs. Sylvester, Miss Dorothy 
Ingham, Mrs. Tyra Andersen, 
Mrs. Stanley Nelson, Mrs. 
Kenneth Carlson, Mrs. Louise 
Solander. 

Committee members include 
Mrs. Albert Collins, Mrs. Ruth 



Nelson, Mrs. Neil Rockwell, Mrs. 
Carl Shelley, Mrs. Harry 
LaCoste, Miss Anna Lundgren, 
Mrs. Eric Swanson, Mrs. Ellen 
Watts, Mrs. Arnold Haglund, 
Mrs. Herbert Johnson, Mrs. 
Samuel Collins, Mrs. Harvey 
Blume, Mrs. David Day, Mrs. 
John Sutterley, Mrs. Herbert 
Acker, Mrs. Frank Anderson and 
Mrs. Howard Bassett. 

The 59th banquet will be held 
Saturday evening, March 30, in 
the church vestry. Members will 
have guest privileges. Details will 
be given at the next meeting, 
Feb. 11. 



Christian Rock Group 
At Woodward School Jan. 30 



The 3:16 Christian Rock 
Group, Wollaston Church of the 
Nazarene, will present a concert 
at the Woodward School for 
Girls, on Wednesday, Jan. 30, at 
2 p.m. 

Members of the group are: 
Wayne Babb, Robert Brown, 
John Costa, Edward Harvey, 
Walter Melton, Peter Mullen 
[Manager], Vincent Pujalte, 
Hudson Samual and James 
Smith. 



The Junior Class of the 
Woodward School is sponsoring 
the concert. Leslie Bendinelli 
and Virginia Mullen are in 
charge. Friends of students are 
invited to attend. Refreshments 
will be served. 



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At Quincy City Hospital 

January 1 1 

Mr. and Mrs. Roger Ford, 18 
Sachem St., a son. 

January 12 

Mr. and Mrs. Michael 
DellaBarba, 47 Curtis St., a son. 

January 13 

Mr. and Mrs. Gerald 
Choquette, 38 Lancaster St., a 
son. 

Mr. and Mrs. Jon Hanshus, 64 
Presidential Drive, a son. 

Mr. and Mrs. William Amaral, 
21 Greystone St., a daughter. 

January 14 

Mr. and Mrs. Richard 
Bielawski, 19 Brockton Ave., a 
daughter. 

January 16 . 

Mr. and Mrs. Paul M. Daley, 
58 Nightingale Ave., a son. 

January 17 

Mr. and Mrs. Richard W. 
Deady Jr., 10 Wren Terrace, a 
son. 

January 17 

Mr. and Mrs. David W. 
Bertrand, 48 Rogers St., a 
daughter. 

January 18 

Mr. and Mrs. Ronald S. 
Cochrane, 27 Lawrence St., a 
son. 

At St. Margarets Hospital 

January 10 

Mr. and Mrs. John Mitchell, 
250 Central Ave., a daughter. 

January 13 

Mr. and Mrs. Paul Breslin, 781 
East Squantum St., a son. 

At St. Margaret's Hospital 
January 3 

Mr. and Mrs. Henry Costa, 
131 Liberty St., a son. 

January 4 

Mr. and Mrs. Steven Colligan, 
150 Main St., a son. 

Mr. and Mrs. Kevin Kelly, 93 
Shirley St., a daughter. 

January 9 

Mr. and Mrs. John Linehan, 
83 Alstead St., a son. 



PERMANENT 
REMOVAL 



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Quincy 
By Appointment only 

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ENGAGED - Mr. and Mrs. Salvatore Cifuni of 257 Adams St., 
Quincy and Dennis, Cape Cod announce the engagement of their 
daughter. Miss Claire Mary Cifuni to Matthew M. Ivil Jr. He is the 
son of Mr. and Mrs. Matthew M. Ivil of Quincy. Miss Cifuni is a 
graduate of Fontbonne Academy and Aquinas Junior College and is 
employed by American Associates in Boston. Mr. Ivil is a graduate of 
Quincy High School and Acadia University and is employed by 
South Shore Television and Appliance in Quincy. A June 2 wedding 
is being planned. 

[Miller Studio] 

Seniors Valentine Dance 
To Be Held On Feb. 15 



Tickets will go on sale Jan. 28 
for the Quincy Senior Citizens 
annual Hearts and Flowers 
Valentine Dance, to be held 
Friday, Feb. 15, at the Fore 
River Clubhouse. 

Highlight will be the selection 
of a "King and Queen of 
Hearts". Gifts will be presented 
to both. 

Mrs. Marion Andrews, 



Director, Senior Citizens 
Activities, Quincy Recreation 
Department announces that a 
chicken pie supper will be served 
at 6:30 p.m. It will be preceded 
by a social hour at 5:30 p.m. 
and followed by dancing from 8 
p.m. until 11 p.m. Bus 
transportation will be provided. 
Reservation deadline will be 
Feb. 8. 



Whist Party At St. Mary's Jan. 28 



St. Mary's Cub Scout Pack 30 
will sponsor a Whist party at St. 
Mary's Church Hall, Crescent 
St., West Quincy, Monday Jan. 
28 at 8 p.m. 

Refreshments will be served. 
The Public is invited. 



DERRINGER 

THE FLORIST 

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'age 8 Quincy Sun Thursday, January 24, 1974 

YOUR HANDWRITING TELLS 

Little cutie 
staggers boys 



By DOROTHY 
ST. JOHN JACKSON 

Certified Master 

Graphoanalyst 

Copley News Service 

Dear Dorothy: 

I'm 19 and am very de- 
pressed most of the time. I go 
out with different boys about 
six nights a week. They all 
seem interested in one thing 
. . . sex! Is it me and my per- 
sonality, or is it just the 
American boy? 

P. A. 

Dear P. A.: 

Sex, that private standard 
by which we love and live, 
now screams out at us from 
every movie screen, every 
billboard, every T.V. com- 
mercial. Are we confusing the 
original product with a cut- 
rate substitute? 

You, my dear, make no 
mistakes in your efforts to 
"stagger" the boys! Your ap- 
pearance is always "in," your 
attire is simple, attractive . 
and "NOW!" 

Then, your naivete is some- 
thing else! You're a little 
cutie, adjusting to whatever 
and whoever comes your way, 
as long as it brings you a little 
attention. Your world is to- 
day ! You let bygones be gone, 
and tomorrow can take care 
of itself, seen in the lack of ex- 
tension in the upper and lower 
loops. Rather than lose out, 



you "give in," seen in the very 
rounded tops on s's. 

If you feel that you are so 
limited in assets that you have 
to rely on your sex appeal for 
superficial popularity, you'll 
have to expect that as you at- 
tract, so do you "sub "tract! If 
sex is your way to go, expect 
to be dropped, quickly and 
without warning, when the 
next "neat" gal comes along. 

If you yield just because 
someone wants you to, you'll 
continue to attract "that 
kind'' of boy. And you'll con- 
tinue to rationalize, as you do 
now, seen in the left loop on o 
and g, and draw your own 
conclusion that ALL boys are 
interested in girls only for 
physical satisfaction. 

Seek some stable help right 
now in establishing some 
sturdy guides for loving and 
living 

When you lack a sense of 
right and wrong, your depres- 
sion is only a hint of the many 
heartaches and tragedies that 
are bound to bind you. 

D.J. 

A free handwriting bro- 
chure of some common basic 
personality traits may be ob- 
tained by writing to Dorothy 
St. John Jackson, Copley 
News Service, in care of this 
newspaper. Enclose long, 
self-addressed, stamped en- 
velope. 







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BEDROOM DOORS VS FIRE 



A closed door between you and 
: raging fire could provide endugh 
protection to save your life. It 
takes fire 10 to 15 minutes to 
burn through a wooden door. 
Many of the 10,000 people who 
die each year in home fires are 
not actually burned to death, but 
are overcome by superheated air, 
smoke and toxic gases. So don't 
automatically fling open your 
bedroom door. This may be a 
fatal impulse. 

If you are awakened by fire 
and the bedroom door is closed, 
test it before opening. If the 
panels are hot or smoke is leaking 
in around the edges - keep it 
closed and use the window exit. If 
the door is open and more than a 
little smoke is present in the 
room, close it immediately. Get 



down low - there's usually a layer 
of relatively smoke-free air about 
1 8 inches off the floor. 

Always sleep with the bedroom 
or hall door closed. It can keep 
fire out long enough to allow 
escape or rescue through the 
window. 

* » * 

This information has been 
brought to you as a public service 
by NABORHOOD PHARMACY, 
406 Hancock St., No. Quincy, 
wheTe you can always count on 
friendly, professional service. 
Hospital equipment and supplies 
for rent or sale. Let us keep your 
prescription tax and insurance 
records. Phone: 773-6426. 



Todau'4 Women 



COOKING CORNER 

Bake vegetables 
to conserve fuel 



By SUSAN DELIGHT 
Copley News Service 

Vegetables, traditionally, 
are prepared by range-top 
cookery. But most vegetables 
can be cooked just as success- 
fully in the oven. To conserve 
fuel the vegetables can be 
cooked along with the entree 
for a complete oven meal. 
These baked vegetables can 
lend variety to dining during 
the winter months, when lack 
of variety often leads to vege- 
table doldrums. 

Celery is a vegetable tradi- 
tionally served raw. But 
celery is an excellent hot 
vegetable and one which will 
be popular when served in a 
dish such as Baked Florida 
Celery Wedges. Another 
vegetable dish which will turn 
vegetable skippers into par- 
takers is No-Mess Oven Fried 
Eggplant which is cooked in a 
baking bag. 

BAKED 
CELERY WEDGES 

1 stalk Florida celery 

2 tablespoons butter or 
margarine 

4 cup minced onion 

Vt cup sliced mushrooms 

2 tablespoons Qour 

1 can ( 12 oz. ) cocktail vege- 
table juice 

1 « teaspoon salt 

Vz teaspoon oregano leaves, 
crumbled 

L 4 teaspoon ground black 
pepper 

Trim stem end from celery 
stalk, keeping base intact. Cut 
top so that stalk is 6-inches 
long. Chop enough tops to 
make Vi cup chopped celery; 
reserve. (Use remaining tops 
for soups, stews, etc.) Cut 
trimmed celery stalk into 
fourths or sixths, lengthwise; 
place in a buttered 12x8x2- 
inch baking dish. In a small 
saucepan melt butter. Add 
onion, mushrooms and re- 
served chopped celery; saute 
5 minutes. Stir in flour. 
Gradually blend in vegetable 




OVEN-DONE - Baked Celery Wedges supported by mushrooms and 
baked to succulent doneness in a well-flavored sauce will make 
vegetable skippers turn into partakers. 



juice, salt, oregano and black 
pepper; bring to boiling point. 
Cook and stir 2 minutes or un- 
til sauce is thickened. Pour 
over celery wedges. Cover 
and bake in a preheated 
moderate oven (350 F.) for 40 
minutes or until celery is 
crisp-tender. (This recipe 
may be doubled.) Garnish 
with celery leaves, if desired. 
Yield: 4 to 6 portions. 



NO-MESS OVEN 
FRIED EGGPLANT 

2 eggplants, about 1 pound 
each 

Flour 

Seasoned dry bread crumbs 

legg 

1 tablespoon oil 

1 teaspoon salt 

v« teaspoon pepper 

3 tomatoes 

6 ounces mozzarella cheese 

Use enough oven-bake wrap 
to line a baking sheet and en- 
close the contents, plus a 3- 
inch overlap. Cut eggplant 



into diagonal slices. Dip into 
flour, in egg beaten with oil 
and salt and pepper, and 
finally into seasoned bread 
crumbs. Lay on lined pan. 
Overlap the film edges of the 
wrap and double-fold the foil 
edges to seal. Pierce the top of 
the wrap six times with a 
meat fork. Bake 15 minutes in 
a preheated 400 degree F. 
oven. Open wrap, fold back 
and crimp the foil. Top each 
slice with a slice of tomato 
and a sprinkling of shredded 
cheese. Return to the oven to 
bake about 5 minutes longer, 
until the cheese melts. Makes 
6 servings. 

Wrap for freezing in fresh 
wrap; use same wrap to line 
pan for reheating eggplant in 
a preheated 400 degree F. 
oven, about 15 minutes. 

Oven-fried eggplant is a de- 
licious side dish even without 
tomato and cheese, a perfect 
vegetable accompaniment for 
lamb, chicken, any meat 
meal. 



The liver of a baboon from 
Cologne Zoo has been trans- 
planted into a 22-year-old 



— LIVER TRANSPLANT — 

West German woman suffer- 
ing chronic hepatitis at 
Bonn's University Clinic by 
Prof. Alfred Gutgemann and 




Prof. Hans Dengler, the first 
such transplant of an animal's 
liver in West Germany. — 



■ 



....Quincy City Hospital was 
founded? Can you identify 
from this photo anyone of the 
First Medical Staff of the 
hospital? 



Do you remember when your 
last property valuation took 
place? Do you know who your 
insurance company is? Talk 
with us at Burgin-Platner. 

BURGIN 

PLATNER 

INS. 

1357 Hancock Street, 
Quincy 472-3000 



Your Horoscope Guide 



For The Week Of 
Jan. 27 to Feb. 2 

By GINA 
Copley News Service 

ARIES: (March 21 to April 

19 — Also Aries Ascendant) — 
A release from pressures con- 
tributes to your high energy. 
Good time to improve ward- 
robe and appearance. Use 
charm to "make points." 
Evaluate budget. Don't just 
walk out on a problem at 
home. 

TAURUS: (April 20 to May 

20 — Also Taurus Ascendant) 

— Be well prepared for all 
public appearances. Focus on 
career — possibility you may 
desire changes. Push career 
matters with charm, not ag- 
gression. Give proper respect 
to those deserving it. 

GEMINI: (May 21 to June 
20 — Also Gemini Ascendant) 

— An especially active, excit- 
ing week. Present projects to 
superiors, pay close attention 
to communications, be alert 
for opportunities. Financial 
opportunity involving fi- 
nances held with partners. 

CANCER: (June 21 to July 
22 — Also Cancer Ascendant) 

— Favorable time regarding 
finances. Someone met now 
could be beneficial to your fu- 
ture. Contacts are helpful but 
must be backed up with solid 
"know how." Focus on long- 
range security goals. 

LEO: (July 23 to August 22 

— Also Leo Ascendant) — Be 

YOUNG MINISTER 

Mrs. Lena Hjelm-Wallen, 
30-year-old teacher, has been 
appointed minister without 
portfolio in Sweden, in charge 
of primary and secondary 
schools, becoming one of the 
youngest ministers in the 
country's history. — CNS 



patient and exert special ef- 
fort regarding domestic af- 
fairs. Someone met now could 
become a life-long friend. An- 
swer your ego needs and in- 
crease inner security through 
work in creative pursuits. 

VIRGO: (August 23 to Sept. 
22 — Also Virgo Ascendant) — 
Keep a cool head and remain 
quiet if you sense jealousy and 
malice from co-workers. Un- 
expected news favoring fi- 
nances is possible. Help and 
cooperation from others is 
forthcoming. Advice is valu- 
able. 

LIBRA: (Sept. 23 to Oct. 22 

— Also Libra Ascendant) — A 

new acquaintance could be 
valuable to you now. Take 
care of "duty before plea- 
sure" for ultimate gain. Home 
redecoration favored now, but 
don't over extend your budg- 
et. Protect your credit rating. 

SCORPIO: (Oct. 23 to Nov. 
21 — Also Scorpio Ascendant) 

— Work on quiet detail chores 
and "take a seat on the side- 
lines" now. Work for more co- 
operation among co-workers. 
Cultural interests and activi- 
ties are highlighted. Using 
savings for speculation not fa- 
vored. 



SAGITTARIUS: (Nov. 22 to 
Dec. 21 — Also Sagittarius As- 
cendant) — Turn attention to 
creative efforts and let ro- 
mance "coast" awhile now. 
Resist negative attitudes and 
keep optimism up. Changes 
possible in work or living 

VINTAGE ACRES 

Increased demand for wine 
and new vineyard plantings 
has pushed the price of prime 
vineyards in California up to 
as high as $6,000 an acre, 
while as recently as 1965 it 
ranged between $1,500 and 
$2,000. - CNS 



quarters. Guard health care- 
fully. 

CAPRICORN: (Dec. 22 to 
Jan. 19 — Also Capricorn As- 
cendant) — Chance meetings 
may be important — trust 
your judgment. Business and 
finances have the spotlight 
now with possibility of trips. 
Give attention to personal ap- 
pearance — adopt a "new 
look." 

AQUARIUS: (Jan. 20 to 
Feb. 18 — Also Aquarius As- 
cendant) — "Think twice" 
about reversing a previous 
decision. Analyze things 
calmly with long-range re- 
sults in mind. Take time out 
from serious concerns to have 
a little fun and possibly ro- 
mance. 

PISCES: (Feb. 19 to March 
20 — Also Pisces Ascendant) 
— Some Pisceans may marry 
now. Make all your plans now 
for the coming year — con- 
centrate on goals. Follow your 
"inner guidance." Strong pos- 
sibility of a job promotion. 
Relish your old friendships. 

UNDERSTAND THE 
"DIFFERENT-NESSES" IN 
OTHERS. EACH OF US IS 
UNIQUE. The study of as- 
trology puts you "in touch" 
with yourselves and improves 
personal relationships. Our 
Home Study Course in As- 
trology for Beginners is now 
available at nominal cost. For 
information, write: Your 
Horoscope Guide, Copley 
News Service, in care of this 
newspaper. 

PICASSO'S COLLECTION 

France has accepted the be- 
quest of the late Pablo Pi- 
casso's collection of paintings 
by other modern ministers, it 
has been announced by the 
Ministry of Finance. The col- 
lection will be exhibited 
permanently at the Louvre . 



General Electrics 





20.8 CO. FT. NO-FROST 
REFRIGERATOR- FREEZER 
Only 30ft* WMe, 66' Hi 9 h.. 

GIANT 6.96 CU. FT. FREEZER... 
BIGGEST AVAILABLE IN A 
TOP-FREEZER MODEL... 
HOLDS UP TO 243 POUNDS 
OF FROZEN FOOD 

FREEZER FEATURES: 

• Jet Freeze ice compartment 

• Ice n Easy Service (or, add an 
Automatic Icemaker, available at 
extra cost) 

REFRIGERATOR FEATURES: 

• Adjustable Meat Pan-attaches 
to any Adjustable Cantilever Shelf 

• Generous door storage 

• Rolls out on Big Wheels 




COOOSCHVICt 
Another reason 
itif Gt is 
Amence s */ 

ms/or 
appliance value 



HANCOCK 

TIRE & APPLIANCE CO. 

115 FRANKLIN ST. 
SOUTH QUINCY 472 1710 
Next To The Ad;im\ Birthplace 



BRAINTREE 

TV & APPLIANCE CO. 

17 HANCOCK ST. 
BRAINTREE SQ. 843-4250 

'Open Fn. Eves Till 9] 



Thursday, January 24, 1974 Quincy Sun Page 9 

ONCE OVER LIGHTLY 

Name tabs should be 
inside information 



By ANN RUDY 
Copley News Service 

If you think in these days of 
"anything goes" fashion, with 
yo-yo hemlines and rhine- 
stones on used denim, that big 
name designers feel threat- 
ened by womens' emerging 
independence and freedom, 
you might be right. 

Otherwise, why do the Big 
Ones like Gucci, Pucci and 
Pierre Cardin put their mono- 
grams or names not inside at 
the neckline, where one might 
expect to find such identifica- 
tion, but on the outside of gar- 
ments and handbags? For as 
much as a woman has to pay 
for a Gucci bag, she is entitled 
to her monogram on it, not 
his. Unless, of course, Gucci 
holds the first mortgage. 

I know if I had to fork out 
$200 for a purse I'd have to put 
it through escrow. And I don't 
want to believe the women I 
see with Pierre Cardin's 
name on a tab, stitched to the 
outside seam of their pants, 



are doing it so people will 
know they paid six times what 
they should have. It isn't lady- 
like. It's like having your 
bank balance tatooed on the 
back of your hand. 

Yes, I think the boys are 
nervous and looking for a lit- 
tle publicity. But unless your 
name happens to be Emilio, 
and I know few women in that 
fix, it does get to be a bore 
having him sign every Pucci 
print he rolls off his presses. 
Even Norman Norell, 
whose designs I greatly ad- 
mire, named his perfume af- 
ter himself. When I pay $23 a 
half ounce for a scent, I do not 
want to smell like Norman. 
For that price I'd like Hum- 
mingbird breath or, at the 
very least, California Pop- 
pies. 

I can only hope that the 
Gucci's, the Puccis and their 
like will relax soon and stop 
writing their names on fash- 
ion's walls. That kind of ego 
graffiti is fast becoming very 
old chapeau. 



Lover made her wear an iron belt 



Catania, Sicily, police are 
investigating the case of a 
young Frenchwoman who was 
wearing an iron chastity belt 
so tight it had to be removed 
by doctors. 



Monique Michel, 23, said 
her Sicilian friend, Paolo 
Butta, 40, forced her to wear 
the belt because he was 
jealous. — CNS 



give 

NEW LIFE 

to your 
old dinette 

REPLACEMENT CHAIRS 



i.rii 






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priced 



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just 



LIMITED SUPPLY >P 
4 TO A CUSTOMER 
CASH & CARRY ONLY 



QUINCY each 

FURNITURE CO. 

1604 HANCOCK ST. Q0INCY 479-1715 



__ 




NEW OFFICERS - George R. Moody [right] received the gavel of office as incoming monarch of Taleb 
Grotto. Others are [left to right] Ronald Neilson; Carl V. Dahlgren, outgoing monarch; and John R. 
Pierce, cast director. 

[Quincy Sun Photo by Laban Whittaker] 

George R. Moody Installed 
Taleb Grotto Monarch 



George R. Moody was 
installed as Monarch of Taleb 
Grotto Friday at ceremonies in 
Quincy Masonic Temple. 

Also installed were: 

Donald Deware, chief justice; 
Ronald Neilson, master of 
ceremonies; Robert W. 
Whitehead, treasurer; Michael 
Pecoraro, secretary; Rev. Chester 
A. Porteus. chaplain; Herbert H. 
Holmes, corresponding 
secretary; Arthur Johnson, 
venerable prophet. 

Craig MacPherson. orator; 
John McCullock, captain of the 
guard; Arthur Senter, marshall; 
David Wight, associate marshall; 
Donald MacLellon, sentinel; 
George Pooler, associate 
sentinel; John Hadfield, 



monarch's aide. 

Installing officers were: 

Robert C. Littlewood, John 
H. Pierce, Walter W. Woodward, 
Joseph Bender, Kenneth Lodge, 
Clarence P. Churchill, 0. 
Wendell Rogers, William Hall, 
Brooks Newton, Wallace 
Newcomb, Hebert H. Guinette, 
Russell Barritt and John 
Newton. 

The outgoing Monarch Carl V. 
Dahlgren presided at the opening 
ceremonies and Donald Deware, 
Clarence Jones and Clarence P. 
Churchill were in charge of the 
memorial service. 

Presiding at the installation 
ceremonies were Robert 
Littlewood, John H. Pierce, 
William Hall, Herbert Hutchins. 



organist; and James Duncan, 
soloist. 

Other officers include: 
Garfield Shupe, chief greeter; 
Gary Goss, Walter Lowry and 
Dick Hirth, associate chief 
greeters; Myles Marsha, captain 
of color guard; Walter Smith, 
band director; Alfred Favor, 
band manager; John Pierce, cast 
director. 

Lorimer Pratt, ambassador to 
the enchanted lantern; Ernest M. 
Wells, ambassador to the blue 
lodge; J. Eldon Moody, Kenneth 
Henderson and Ernest Wells, 
trustees; Ernest M. Wells, grand 
monarch's aide; Oscar Frisk, 
secretary emeritus; and Edwin C. 
Hinckley, ambassador emeritus. 



South Shore Beauty Supply 



iiowfoSvou" 

CONVENIENCF- 
ANEW 

G\FT 



Complete Selection of 
World Famous Beauty 
Aids at Discount Prices 
1612 Hancock St. 
Quincy 472-9000 
Across from Sears 
Open 9 to 9 Mon., Thurs., Fri. 
9 to 6 Tues., Wed., Sat. . 



f 0f "P/ete 
/ Se 'ect, 0n 



I Sty l 



Mgl 



ofj 



ing 



' Sales 



and 









! *m 



,A» J i i «• ** " " — 



GRAMTt 
cooVhativi 

BANK 



m 



/ 






RISING. 

Our building is going up. ..our | _fftf| 1 |"A 
interest is already there. Open VJIilllll^^ 

an account at either office today. / 0<^f 

%KK£S- /i^co:oper^tive^ 

DAILY 9-3, FRIDAY 9-5:30 479-6040/ 

100 GRANITE ST., DOWNTOWN 
DAILY 11-6, FRIDAY 11-8 SATURDAY 10-2 471-3900' 






cfiank 



Merrymount Association 
Installation Dance Friday 



The annual installation dance 
of the Merrymount Association 
will be held Friday .vening at 
the Adam's Heights Men's Club, 
Bower Rd, Quincy. 

Mr. and Mrs. Paul Flynn are 
chairmen of the event which will 
feature dancing from 8:30 p.m. 
to 12:30 a.m., to the music u\' 
the Kelly Orchestra. A midnight 
buffet will be served. 

The outgoing president, Mrs. 
Patrick Gibbons, will present the 
gavel to incoming President Paul 



Hussey. 

Installed also will be Dr. 
James Iorio, vice president; 
Robert Mitchell, treasurer; Mrs. 
Francis Whalen, recording 
secretary; Mrs. Arthur Rochelle 
Jr., corresponding secretary and 
the following directors: Henry 
Breen, Francis Fareri, Edward 
Elavin, Mrs Paul Flynn, Paul 
Lewis, Robert Mafera, Matthew 
McDonnell and T. David 
Raftery. 



St. John's CYO To Hold 
Sno-Ball Dance Saturday 



St. John's CYO will sponsor a 
"Sno-Ball Dance" at the Quincy 
Voc-Tech. gym Saturday from 8 
to 1 1 p.m. "The Second 
Society" will provide the music. 
Tickets are available from 
members of the committee: 

Deborah D'Olimpio, Diane 
D'Olimpio, Maureen Corcoran, 
Miriam Banuk, James Hall, Jane 
Waters, James Keenan, Peter 
Keenan, Ann Cronin, Joanne 
Caloia, Theresa Tucker, Maureen 



Duggan, Francine Colletta, Betsy 
O'Hare, Linda Buttomer, David 
Buttomer, John Christian, Lucy 
DiRamio, at St. John's Rectory 
or at Jason's Music Shop. 

Tickets will not be sold at the 
door. 

The Drop-In Center at St. 
John's will not be open on 
Friday. 

The CYO executive board will 
meet Sunday at 7 p.m. in the 
rectory. 



Mrs. Anna Goodman 
Quincy Adults President 



The Quincy Adults who meet 
each Monday afternoon at the 
South Area Jewish Community 
Center, 10 Merrymount Rd, 
Quincy, installed officers 
Monday. 

Mrs. Ida Orenstein, on the 
staff at the Center, was the 
installer. 

Installed were: 

President, Mrs. Anna 
Goodman, 112 Greenleaf St., 
Quincy; vice-president, Mrs. 



Charles Vierkant, 14 Gibson Rd; 
secretary, Mrs. Rose Rosenfield, 
Chapman St., and treasurer, Mrs. 
Charlotte Pollack, 53 West St., 
all of Quincy. 

Mrs. Sandy Sandberg is 
advisor and Mrs. Jane Ravid is 
director. 

Additional members 
welcomed. Transportation 
be arranged by calling 
Sandberg at 328-0950 or 
Ida Orenstein at 773-3000. 



are 
can 

Mrs. 
Mrs. 



3 Quincy Girls Among 
Carol Nashe Graduates 



Three Quincy girls will be 
among the graduates at the 22nd 
annual ceremonies of the Carol 
Nashe School Tuesday [Jan. 29] 
at 8 p.m. in the Dome Ballroom 
of the Hotel Lenox in Boston. 

They are Susan Bridgeman, 
Jean Howard and Patricia 



Kelley. 

Misses Bridgeman and Kelley 
are also competing for a S250 
scholarship in the Carol Nashe 
Model of the Year competition, 
the winner of which will be 
announced the same evening. 



MRS. FRANK BARTLETT ASSISTANT TREASURER 



Mrs. Frank Bartlett of Quincy 
has been elected assistant 
treasurer of the Women's 



Auxiliary to the Baptist Home 
of Massachusetts in Newton. 




SOUTH SBQRI nuwBM.«miMei 

LWViCOl* H'Ot lot 

FACTORY SERVICE 



FOR 



RCA-MOTROLA-SYLVANIA-ZENITH 

ADMIRAL -MASTER WORKS 

Call 479-1350 



PRE 
OPENING 




EVERYTHING MUST GO! 
All First Quality 

SHORT ROLLS REMNANTS 

SHAGS - PLUSHES - Heavy Duty COMMERCIALS 
WOOLS NYLONS HERCULONS 

also ODD SIZE AREA RUGS from $8. up 

Thurs. Jan. 24 thru Fri. Feb. 1 

FASHION FLOORS 

528 Washington Street 

QUINCY POINT 471-2865 

FORMERLY AT 1043 HANCOCK STREET 



Thursday, January 24, 1974 Quincy Sun Page 1 1 



The 

Money Tree Bank 

proudly presents 

The Money Tree Maxi Statement Account 



Checking Account: 

In order to qualify for Maxi 
Statement, you'll need two 
things: a checking account 
and a savings account. Your 
checking account \sfree. 
You may write as many checks 
as you wish and you don't 
need to worry about keeping a 
minimum balance. 



What the Money Tree Maxi Statement 1$: 



Savings Accounts: 

You'll need one savings 
account with a monthly 
minimum balance of S200. 
Interest on our regular and 
90-day Notice Account's 
IS500 minimum balance I is 
earned at the maximum rate 
allowable by law. 



Loans: 

.Other accounts, such as 
instalment loans, may be 
included on your Maxi 
Statement. Maxi Statement 
customers are allowed six 
accounts exclusive of 
checking account. They are 
the basic savings account plus 
any combination of five others. 



Maxi Transfer: 

With Maxi Statement, you can 
move your money between 
accounts easier than ever 
before. Just fill out a transfer 
slip, present or mail it to us. 
and we will promptly make the 
transfer. You may also set up a 
regular transfer program for a 
systematic savings plan. 



Max! Credit: 

You may also apply for 
personal "line of credit" — 
Maxi Credit — on your Maxi 
Statement. You may borrow 
from Maxi Credit up to your 
prearranged limit. Maxi Credit 
also gives you built-in 
overdraft protection. 



w 



I km to Read the 
Maxi Statement: 

The Maxi Statement is practical, 
easy-to-read, and very complete. You 
won't find a more efficient way to bank. 

If you haveanv questions or would like 

additional information, the name of 

your personal banker is included 
• Checking account transact ionsare listed here. 

All savings accounts transactions are 

noted here. 

Information on instalment loans is included 

in this area. 

Maxi Credit transact inns are listed here. 

Maxi Credit interest rates are noted here. 




Who Should Have 
Maxi Statement: 

Everybody. Why? Because 
Maxi Statement makes things 
easier for you. Maxi Statement 
combines your Hancock Bank 
checking, savings and loan 
accounts together into one 
convenient statement, once a 
month. We've made sure Maxi 
Statement gives you the most 
efficient and practical method 
ever devised to manage your 
hanking requirements. 



Whete You Open a Money Tree Maxi Statement Account: 

There are fifteen Hancock Bank offices located south and west of Boston: 
eight South Shore offices, telephone 773-0500; seven Mid County offices, 
telephone 7b l H3(X). If you are currently hanking with us. ask your 
Hancock hanker for our comprehensive brochure, including applications, 
on Maxi Statement. If you are not banking with us. please call. Our 
operators will direct you to our nearest office. Our people 

will he happy £|fe _ to talk with vou! 



S °me grow with « s 




HANCOCK 
BANK 

Main office in Quincy Center with 14 branches spread out south and west 
of Boston. Quincy 773-0500, Norwood 769-1300. 




Member F.D.I.C. 



Page 12 Quincy Sun Thursday, January 24, 1974 



Young Ideas 

Unedited selections from the writings 
of Quincy's elementary school children. 



WOLLASTON 



I AM AN APPLE 

I am a apple hanging on a 
tree. One day a boy six years old 
was climbing up my tree and got 
tired and hungry. He went to 
pick another apple. When he 
picked it a worm was in it. He 
looked at me. I was shiny and 
red. No worms were in me so he 
picked me. When he was ready 
to bite me, his mother called. He 
dropped me I broke. Then I 
went to apple heaven to get 
another red robe. The End. 

Beverly McEachern 

Wollaston School 

Grade 4 

THE PIMPLE 

I am a pimple and 1 have lots 
of friends. Every day one of 
them gets picked off. One day 
she picked me off and I started 
to bleed. The End. 

Kerri McCready 

Wollaston School 

Grade 4 

THE FIRE STATION 

We saw a shiney red fire 

engine. We went down the pole. 

Susan Costello 

Wollaston School 

Grade 2 - 3 

WHAT I SAW AT 
THE FIRE STATION 

I went to the Fhe Station 
with my class. I slid down the 
pole. And I rang the bell. They 
have a brand new hook and 
ladder. 

Melissa Allen 

Wollaston School 

Grade 2 - 3 

MY TRIP TO THE 
FIRE STATION 

Our class went to the fire 
station. We saw the brand new 
fire truck. We walked to the fire 
station. I rang the bell. 

Nora Furey 

Wollaston School 

Grade 2 

MRS. SAGANOR 

Dear Mrs. Saganor. 

Thank you for comeing to our 
class. 

Ellen Farrell 

Wollaston School 

Grade 2 - 3 



MUSIC LESSONS 

Professional Instruction 
DRUM PIANO GUITAR 
BRASS REEDS 

WOLLASTON MUSIC CENTER, 

27 Beale St.. Wollaston 
Call 773-5325 



ACV AURORA 
AFX RACE SETS 

CARS & ACCESSORIES 

TYCO HO. TRAINS 

and Accessories 

DRUM SETS 
GUITARS 

Music Accessories 

MUSIC 
BOOKS 

Piano ■ Guitar 
Harmonica - Recorder 
All Organ - Chord Organ 

WOLLASTON 

MUSIC CENTER 
AND HOBBY SHOP 

27 Beale St. Wollaston 
Call 773-5325 



THE PEN 

I'm a pen. Jully uses me 
everyday for letters and 
penmanship. One day the stores 
ran out of lead. Jully bought the 
lart pen and gave it away. I got 
tossed into the wastebasket. I 
was two years old in Pen Heaven 
talking to ten fifty year old 
pens. Jully does not care. Boo 
Hoo, Boo Hoo. The End. 

Beth Barron 

Wollaston School 

Grade 4 

THE SNOWMAN 

There once was a snowman on 
top of a hill. 

All day long he would stay 
verey still. 

The wind would always blow, 
The snow would always show. 
But on that hill 
The snowman stands still. 

Rosemary Cullen 

Atherton Hough School 

Grade 4 

WINTERTIME 

I like winter because it always 
snows and I can make snowballs 
and snowmen too. Do you like 
winter? I think it's lots of fun. I 
hope Santa Claus brings lots of 
presents to you. Everyone like 
Santa Clause because he is nice 
to everyone. 

Veronica Richman 

Atherton Hough School 

Grade 4 

THE FIELD TRIP 

On our field trip we went to 
Rocky Mountains. We had to 
climb up some rocks to the top 
and Mr. Crowly told us about 
the lava flow. He told us to look 
for a lava rock. It was a dark 
green color and it was 
interesting. Then we went to 
West Quincy and tried to look 
for the granite. We went on the 
granite railroad and it was 
disgraceful to see it all messed 
up because that is suppose to be 
a nice place to visit an a field 
trip for classes. I think you 
should do something about it 
because I think it would be a 
nice place to visit if you clean it 
up. 

I think you should fix it up. I 
think if you cleaned it up you 
will find many different kinds of 
rocks. 

Meredith Burt 

Snug Harbor School 

Grade 5 



SOUTH SHORE 
SEWING MACHINE CO. 

We Service All Makes Sewing 
Machines and Vacuum Cleaners 
665 A Hancock St., Wollaston 
471-5982 



WOLLASTON 



QUINCY PN i 1600 



JAN. 23 THRU JAN. 29 



THE TRAIN 
ROBBERS 

WITH JOHN WAYNE 

ANN MARGRET 

7:30 [P.G.] 

THE DEADLY 
TRACKERS 

RICHARD HARRIS 

ROD TAYLOR 

9:10 [P.G.] 



$1 00 ADMISSION AT 
ALL PERFORMANCES 




ARTIST'S RENDERING of $4.4 million Clay St., Wollaston senior citizens housing facility. Work has 
started on the 12-story, 200-unit structure and is expected to be completed in a year and a half. 
Architect is Joseph A. Donahue of Quincy. 

St. Ann's Marianns To Present 
'Clowning Around 9 Feb. 2-3-4 



St. Ann's Marianns of 
Wollaston, are now in rehearsal 
for "Clowning Around" a 
minstrel type show to be 
presented Feb. 2, 3, 4. at 8:30 
p.m. in St. Ann's School Hall. 

A special childrens 
performance will be held 
Saturday Feb. 2 at 2 p.m. 

The show is being produced 
by Ed Rooney. 

Tickets are available from any 
cast member or by calling 
773-2226 or 479-9583. Among 
those participating in the show 
are: 

Joseph Sullivan as "Mr. 
Interlocutor", with Bill Cahill, 
Rose Dunlea, Nick Fasano, 
Edward McDermott, David 



McGrath, Margaret Mclntire, 
Donald McGowan, Ronan 
Storer, Rita Sullivan, John 
Tempester, Connie White and 
Francis Williams as ".end 
people". 

"Front line dancers" will be 
June Burns, Ann Darcy, 
Marianna Donahue, Carmilita 
Guinan, Rosalie Killion, 
Dorothy Lynch, Claire Mitchell, 
Holly Powers, Joanne Roden 
and Phylis Sullivan. 

Members of the chorus are: 
Lisa Byrne, Helen Costello, Ellen 
Conlon, Pat Cosseboom, Elaine 
Dougan, Helen DesRoches, 
Stephanie Durkin, Moss Dunn, 
Ann Duwan, Richard Duwan, 
Mary Jane Fandel, Julie 
Federico, Peg Fasano, Rita 



Flanagan, Al Flanders, Natalie 
Graham, Dolores Golden, Nancy 
Greene, Helen Gallahue, Bea 
Hurley, Jocelyn Johnston, 
Eleanor Haley, Peg Jordan, 
Pauline LaBerge, Marge Mullen, 
Kay Mullen, Peg McFarland, 
Jean Maloney, Walter 
MacKerrer, Gerri McCready, Pat 
Meehan, Regina McMahon, Bette 

McGonagle, Marge McGowan, 
Mary McDonald, Karen Mitchell, 
Ann Montgomery, Lorraine 
O'Brien, Carole O'Connell, Joan 
Pasquinelli, Jenny Rose, Shelia 
Roche, Mary Sullivan, Esther 
Tempester, Mary Toomey, Ellen 
Voelkel, Marion Venna, Mildred 
Vento, Helen Whitaker, Chris 
White and Ellie Winters. 



$957,000 In U.S. Funds Granted 
To Acquire Wollaston Golf Course 



Norfolk County has been 
awarded 5957,000 in federal 

«g WoHaston^ 
Florist- 




funds toward the acquisition of 
the 93-acre Wollaston Golf 
Course and its development as a 
huge recreational complex for the 
county. 

The announcement was made 
by Rep. James A. Burke 



[D-Milton]. 

The federal funds, from the 
Bureau of Outdoor Recreation 

in the Department of the 

Interior, will be matched by 

local funds in purchasing the 
golf course for $1,947,000. 



OPEN 



SUNDAYS t$J 

I PEARL _T_ 



® 



Zoia Appointed Assistant Harbor Master 



1472 

■HtbONAHUE 
TJELIVE R MARY 

*■ ■** TANTILLO 

679 HANCOCK ST. 

WO LLA STON 



Joseph J. Zoia of 39 Dickens 
St., Wollaston has been 

appointed an assistant harbor 

Pvt. William Burke M 

Marine Pvt. William P. Burke. 




WOLLASTON 
CREDIT UNION 

PERSONAL & AUTO LOANS 
NO NOTICE SAVINGS ACCTS. 
EARN 5 1 /2% pr.rt ANNUM 



SPECIAL 
NOTICE 



CO/ PER 
OTb ANNUM 






REAL ESTATE-MORTGAGES 
HOME IMPROVEMENTS 

ALL ACCOUNTS FULLY INSURED 
UNDER LAW BY MASS.C.U. 
SHARE INSURANCE CORP 

651 HANCOCK ST., 
WOLLASTON 
773-3500 773-8600 

OPEN MON.-THURS. 9-8 TUES.. WED.. FRI. 9-5 



master by Mayor Walter J. 
Hannon. The appointment will 
continue through the first 
Monday in February, 1975. 

arine Corps Graduate 

son of Mr . Joseph E. Burke of 
145 Willow St., Wollaston, 
graduated from basic training at 
the Marine Corps Recmit Depot, 
Parris Island, S.C. He is a 1972 
graduate of North Quincy High 
School. 



• FLAGS * 

INDOOR OUTDOOR 
ACCESSORIES 



FLAGS MADE TO ORDER 

STATE FLAGS CHURCH FLAGS 

FLAGS OF ALL NATIONS 

EAGLE FLAG 
CO.,INC. 

147 Beach St., 472-8242 
Wollaston. Mass. 02170 



Thursday, January 24, 1974 Quincy Sun Page 13 




(Positively No-Charge Checking.) 



• 




Positively no charge checking 
is now available with Norfolk's 
APBP No minimum balance 
requirements. No per check 
charge. No monthly service 
charge. It's positively free of 
normal service charges. 

All you need to take advan- 
tage of free checking is to 
become a member of the All 



Purpose Bank Plan. Only two 

accounts are necessary— a 

checking account and a daily 

interest savings account. 

The savings account may 

be opened for as little as 

$5.00 and your savings 

earn 5%, the highest 

interest rate Norfolk is 

allowed to pay under 

current Federal 

Reserve Regulations. 

What's more, a simple 

transfer slip lets you keep 

money in savings until you 

need it. When you do, transfer 

back to checking and write as 

many checks as you like. Isn't 

that a good way to manage 

your money. 

Positively no charge checking 

is another good reason to join 

the All Purpose Bank Plan. You 

can also enjoy Reserve Credit, 

Photo Master Charge, and a 

Red Carpet Courtesy Card. All 

under one account number. 

All on one monthly statement. 

And isn't that what banking's 

all about. 



Norfolk County Trust Company 
*A11 Purpose Bank Plan. 






MEMBER F.D.I.C. 



. 






tmm 



Page 14 Quincy Sun Thursday, January 24, 1974 




Cow& tu /af /oirs J aycees 



•••••• •> QUINCY JAYCEE WEEK 




JAN. 20-26 



In 24th Year 



Quincy Jaycees Set Energetic Goals For 1974 



By STEVE FERRARA 

The Quincy Jaycees, in their 
24th year have set energetic- 
goals for 1974. 

Some of the goals outlined by 
Domenk J. Silvestro, president 
of the Quincy Chapter, work 
with retarded children within 
the Quincy school system. 

* Aiding the School 
Committee in expanding 
community schools [adult 
education programs, senior 
citizen and youth social 
organizations] . 

• Aiding in any way the 
betterment of Quincy. 

Expanding social activity to 
include people all over Quincy 
who are busy with careers but 
who need "people their own age 
to make them feel comfortable 
in our city." 

Those are pretty high goals. 
Can the Jaycees live up to the 
high standards they have set for 
themselves? Their past 
performance says "Yes". 



Last April the Jaycees put on 
their annual kiddie show at the 
Wollaston Theatre, with 
magicians, singers and a clown. 

In June they ran a "Special 
Olympics" for the retarded at 
Quincy Veterans Memorial 
Stadium. The kids competed in 
running, races, the javelin throw 
and other track events. 

At Quincy Center's Sidewalk 
Bazaar last July they participated 
in "Project Identification" with 
the Quincy Police. 

"We engraved over 700 
bicycles with social security 
numbers and registered them 
with the police, and it's still 
going on. You can borrow an 
engraver through the police 
department to put identifying 
numbers on any valuables in 
your home." 

In November they put an 
"Oldies but Goodies" Greaser 
dance at the Fore River Club 
House that was open to the 
public. The dance drew around 



220 and the proceeds were used 
the following week to send 
retarded youngsters on a hay 
ride in Andover. 

Last month the Jaycees 
sponsored and ran a Christmas 
party for retarded kids in 
conjunction with the Quincy 
Recreation Department at North 
Quincy High School. 

The Quincy Jaycees serve a 
city of 90,000, where 18 percent 
of the population is of Jaycee 
age. But membership is low. 
Why don't more people join an 
organization that seems to offer 
so much in the way of 
self-satisfaction and 
advancement? 

Silvestro explained, "Whether 
you realize it or not, Quincy is a 
commuter town, it is very 
transient. Young men come in 
for 12 to 18 months and leave 
for another job. They live here 
because they don't want to live 
in Boston, but they don't want 
to live in Quincy either. They 



WE SALUTE 
THE JAYCEES 

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• Entertainment and Dancing nightly 

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THE 

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MOTOR INN 

29 Hancock Street, Quincy, 328-1500 






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« » 



\*fc SALUTE YOVA 



DEDICATED TO 
M0VIN6 FORWARD 



Your efforts have helped our town grow 
and prosper. Your ideas and ideals 
have set an example for the entire com- 
munity. We salute your exemplary 
achievements and take pride in your dedication. 

Hancock Bank 

14 Banking Offices Throughout the County 
7 In Quincy and the South Shore 




come and they go." 

Those who stay, tackle 
projects to help their 
community. 

What are the Jaycees? 

Everybody has heard of the 
Jaycees-it is a national 
organization. But what do they 
do? 

Open to anyone from age 18 
to 35-women were allowed to 
join as associate members only 
last year-the Jaycees is a 
"'thorough Dfle Carnegie 
course," says Silvestro. "It is a 
community service organization 
as well as a self-betterment 
program." 

The basic tenet of the Jaycees 
is "Young men can change the 
world." 

Jaycee Creed 

We believe . . . 

* That faith in God gives meaning and purpose to human life. 

* That brotherhood of man transcends the sovereignty of nations. 

* That economic justice can best be won by free men through free 
enterprise. 

* That government should be of laws rather than of men. 

* That earth's great treasure lies in human personality. 

* And that service to humanity is the best work of life. 



Silvestro explained, "You can 
do your own thing in the 
Jaycees. When you join the 
Jaycees you gain contacts with 
men your own age and in your 
own field who can help you. 
You are doing your community 
a service as well as helping 
yourself." 

On Tuesday night over 300 
members attended the District 
Three meeting at Knights of 
Columbus Hall in Weymouth. 
Gov. Francis W. Sargent 
commended the Jaycees for 
their work in serving the people 
of their community. 

For information on joining 
the Quincy Jaycees call Dom 
Silvestro at 471-9175. 



We Are Proud 
Of Our Quincy Jaycees 



JAYCEES 



Jaycees Lead the Way 
with Their 

Energy, 

Ideals and 

Efforts 

Frank's Deli And Sub Shop 
662 Hancock St., Wollaston 




HAT/OM4L JAYC££WE£K* 



We Salute 



Quincy Jaycees 
For Their Leadership 



30UTM SHORE 

minaoH i tmuiiei 

DeNicola Bros., Inc 



1570 HANCOCK ST., QUINCY 479-1350 



Thursday, January 24, 1974 Quincy Sun Page 15 



• PROCLAMATION 

WHEREAS, the civic bodies and service organizations of our 
community and the departments of local government- recognize the 
great service rendered to this community by the Quincy Jaycees, and 

WHEREAS, the United States Jaycees and its affiliated state and 
local organizations have set aside the week of January 20 through 
January 26, 1974, to observe the founding of the Jaycees and to 
promote the activities of the Jaycees, and 

WHEREAS, this organization of young men has contributed 
tremendously to the betterment of this community throughout the 
year, 

NOW, THEREFORE, I, Walter J. Hannon, Mayor of the City of 
Quincy, do hereby proclaim the week of January 20 through 
January 26, 1974, as 

JAYCEE WEEK 

and urge all citizens of our community to give full consideration to 
the future services of the Jaycees. 

Walter J. Hannon, Mayor 

Meet The Quincy Jaycee Officers 



Officers of the Quincy 
Jaycees are: 

President Domenic J. Silvestro 
of the Seiler Severin Corp.; First 
Vice-president John Keeney. 
Daley Care Management Co., 
Inc.; Second Vice-president 
David F. Mercier, Colonial 
Federal Savings and Loan 
Association; Secretary Robert 



Austin, Sun Life of Canada; 
Treasurer Tom Pelletier, Meahl 
McNamara and Co. 

Directors are Kenneth 
MacConnell, Norfolk County 
Sheriff's Association; Jack 
Wipfler, Sanitas Waste Control 
Co.; and immediate past 
president Charles J. Leonard of 
Sun Life of Canada. 



r 




1517 Hancock St., Quincy 

Salutes the 
Jaycees Of Quincy 

for their outstanding 
civic endeavors 



//afsTHffoYau... 

Quincy 




te!W [ -&M(8i&' 



Sears Roebuck 

1591 Hancock St. 
Quincy 




JAYCEES - Mayor Walter J. Hannon proclaims Jan 20-26 Jaycee Week in Quincy as Domenic J. 
Silvestro [right] , Quincy Jaycees president and Atty. Alan Finer, member, look on. 



''- "< v ' t^" 




We Salute Our Quincy Jaycees 
Quincy Savings Bank 

1374 Hancock St., 
371 Hancock St., 138 Franklin St. 




mm 



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i#»iia^ - .ud* ^ 'UJiia 




A BETTER TOMORROW... 

wens 

of Quincy 

• . . the Young Men who Build 

They're young men of untiring energy. They're 

young men with ideas and ideals — and they put 

. them to work for our community's well-being. 

When we think of progress — present 

and future — we think of our Jaycees. 



South Shore 
National Bank 




Page 16Quincy Sun Thursday, January 24, 1974 



avcees 



DEDICATED TO M0VIN6 FORWARD 
Hannon, Burke, 
Mclntyre, Kennedy 

Among Former Jaycees 



Mayor Walter J. Hannon was a 
member. 

So was Dist. Atty. George G. 
Burke and Photographer George 
Blackwell. 

And Executive Secretary 
Joseph P. Shea, Atty. Richard 
W. Barry, Robert M. Rosenberg 
of Dunkin Donuts, Maurice 
[Mike] Grossman of L. 
Grossman's Sons, former Mayor 
James R. Mclntyre and former 
President John F. Kennedy. 

And City Development 
Coordinator John J. Cheney, 
William J. Griffin of Hancock 
Bank. Philip Lawrence of 
Colonial Federal Savings and 
Loan Association, Charles G. 
Petersen of South Shore 



National Bank and Nelson 
Rockefeller. 

The organization that once 
claimed such a wide spectrum of 
Americans is the Junior 
Chamber of Commerce - the 
Jaycees. 

Founded in 1920, the Jaycees 
now boast a membership of 
more than 325,000 across the 
nation, 5,000 of them in 
chapters in 126 Massachusetts 
cities and towns. 

The Jaycees, with a 
membership drawn from all 
races and creeds and walks of 
life, are active in agriculture, 
education, government, health, 
safety, youth and international 
affairs. 



In Quincy 
And 



ACROSS THE NATION 



QU 



WMMM 



WORK FOR YOU 



V 



»MYC£ES 



Shipbuilders 
Co-operative 
Bank 



l Granite Street, 
Quincy 



Congratulations 

To 
Quincy 

JAYCEES 

Noble's 
Camera Shop 

680 Hancock St. 
Wollaston 




QUINCY JAYCEES' Distinguished Service Award presented annually in recognition of outstanding 
public service is admired by Richard J. Koch [right] , last year's recipient and Raymond Cattaneo of the 
Park Department. Koch is executive secretary of the Quincy Park-Recreation Board and founder of the 
Koch Club. 

Outstanding Community Service 

9th Distinguished Service Award 
To Be Presented In Spring 



The ninth annual 
Distinguished Service Award 
dinner is now being planned for 
the spring by the Quincy 
Jaycees. 

The award, given annually 
since 1966, is in recognition of 
outstanding community service 
by an individual. 

Past winners arc: 

1966 - Dr. Charles Djerf, 
Quincy pediatrician and former 
member of the School 
Committee. 

1967 - Rev. Bedros Baharian, 
pastor of Quincy Point 
Congregational Church. 

1968 - Dr. Edward Mann, 
former president of Eastern 
Nazarene College and former 



•, 




Late 
DR. CHARLES DJERF 
First Winner 



School Committee member. 

1969 - A. Wendell Clark, 
business leader and longtime 
member of the School 
Committee. 

1970 - Frank E. Remick, 
Quincy Center businessman and 
civic leader. 

1971 - John W. Blake, 
treasurer of Colony, Inc., 
fund-raising chairman for the 
Salvation Army and civic leader. 

1972 - William A. O'Connell, 
former executive vice president 
of the Quincy-South Shore 
Chamber of Commerce. 

1973 - Richard J. Koch, 
executive secretary Quincy 
Park-Recreation Board and 
founder of the Koch Club. 



Our young Jaycees have 



entwined today's tasks with tomorrow's 
goals. Their dedication, unsurpassed achieve- 
ments have given us the insight we need to 
work together. 



QUINCY JAYCEES 
WE SALUTE YOU 




This week, we honor our local Jaycee members for 
the outstanding contribution they have made to this 
community. Whether the task is to provide programs 
for our youth, eliminate pollution, or help develop 
areas, you can depend on the Jaycees to act with 
vigor and imagination! 



«MH 



Jways one step ahead. 
That's your Jaycees. Giv- 
ing your community every- 
thing they've got. Their 
goal? Never-ending prog- 
ress in a world of constant 
changes. Are you proud? 
All year long I 

Colonial Federal, 

Savings and 

Loan 

Assoc. 



15 Beach Street, 



Wollastoi 



Thursday, January 24, 1974 Quincy Sun Page 17 



William Flavin 
In Concert Sunday 
At First Parish Church 



The Music Committee of 
United First Parish Church, 
Quincy Sq., will sponsor a 
concert by William T. Flavin 
Sunday afternoon, at 4 p.m. at 
the church. The public is invited. 

Mr. Flavin has been soloist at 
the church for the past 1 3 years 
and at present is also soloist at 
the New North Church in 
Hingham and at the Community 
Church in Boston. 

He has sung leading roles with 
several opera companies in the 
United States and Canada 
including the New York City 
Opera Company, Richmond 
Opera, Boston Opera Company 
and the British Opera Company, 
Canada. 

Mr. Flavin has sung 
extensively in concert, radio and 
television programs. However, 
this will be his first full recital in 
Quincy. His favorite roles 



include Canlo in 1 Pagliacci and 
Lieutenant Pinkerton in Madame 
Butterfly. Recent appearances 
have included two performances 
of Saint Nicolas by Britten in 
Montreal and Phillips Exeter 
Academy and the role of Curley 
in the East Coast premiere of the 
new opera "Of Mice and Men" 
by Carlisle Floyd, presented by 
the New England Regional 
Opera Company. 

Miss Sue Kruger of Hingham 
will join Mr. Flavin for a duet 
from Tosca and will present 
solos. Miss Kruger has had a fine 
career as a soprano soloist in the 
New England area. 

The concert is free and all are 
cordially invited for an hour of 
outstanding French, Italian and 
German song literature. There 
will be a short reception in the 
Parish Hall of the church 
following the concert. 



8 From Quincy Nominated As 
West Point, Annapolis Alternates 



Eight Quincy youths have 
been nominated by Congressman 
James A. Burke as alternates to 
fill two openings each at the 
U.S. Military Academy at West 
Point and the U.S. Naval 
Academy at Annapolis. 

They are: 

West Point - Charles E. 
Donovan Jr., 120 Elliot Ave., 
North Quincy; Robert J. 
Kerwin, 80 Henry St., Quincy; 
Stephen E. Maloney, 311 
Safford St., Montclair and 
Christopher Ryan, 84 Fennon 
St., Wollaston. 

Annapolis - Gary Flanigan, 
219 Belmont St., Quincy; 
Douglas A. Lane, 24 Ellington 



Rd, Wollaston; Stephen E. 
Nolan, 65 Monroe Rd, Quincy; 
Michael P. Rand, 49 Edison 
Park, Quincy. 

Alternate candidates form a 
pool of young men from which 
appointees may be chosen if the 
principal candidates decline the 
nomination or cannot pass the 
entrance tests. 

In addition, Charles E. 
Pearson, 54 Ames St., and 
Charles L. Shea, 201 Manet 
Ave., both Quincy, were selected 
by Burke to compete for eight 
openings available to 
Massachusetts at the Merchant 
Marine Academy at King's Point, 
N.Y. 



Early High School 
Dismissals Feb. I, 8 



All students at Quincy High 
S ch ool and Quincy 
Vocational-Technical School will 
be released at 12:30 Friday, 
Feb. 1, to permit the afternoon 
to be used for a special 
workshop for teachers in these 
schools. The workshop will be 
held in the Quincy Method 
Center of Quincy High School 
from 1 to 3 p.m. 

All students in North Quincy 
High School and Quincy Junior 
College will be dismissed at 
'2:30 p.m. Friday, Feb. 8, to 



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for a special workshop for 
teachers of those two schools. 
The workshop will be held in the 
Teal Building, North Quincy 
High School, from 1 to 3 p.m. 



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Sun home delivery route. 

Telephone: 471-3100 



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Dinner-Theater Gift Certificate 
Registration Extended To Jan. 30 



You have four extra days to 
wiri one of the 14 $20 
dinner-theatre gift certificates 
being awarded by the North 
Quincy Business and 
Professional Association. 

Andrew Walsh of Walsh's 
Restaurant, association 
president, said, "The response to 
the promotion has been so good 
that we decided to extend the 
registration deadline from Jan. 
26 to Jan. 30." 

The gift certificates will 
include dinner for two and 
attendance at the Chateau de 
Ville, Randolph presentation of 
the Rodgers and Hammerstein 



musical hit, "The King and I". 
The show stars William Chapman 
and Karen Sheperd. 

Names of the winners will be 
drawn Jan. 31 at a 5:30 p.m. 
cocktail hour at Walsh's 
Restaurant, Billings Rd. 

Registrations coupons are 
available at the participating 
businesses. A coupon appearing 
on this page in today's Quincy 
Sun may also be used for 
registering. 

Mayor Walter J. Hannon and 
Ward 6 Councillor Dennis E. 
Harrington will be guests at the 
drawing. 

Participating businesses are: 



Doran & Horrigan Insurance, 
Cammy's Delicatessen, President 
Real Estate, Mister Sub, Fashion 
Quality Cleaners, Balducci's 
Pizza, Curtis Market, Henry 
Thornton Real Estate, Topo 
Gigio Restaurant, Barmo Used 
Furniture, Shoe Villa. 

Quincy Savings Bank, 
Naborhood Pharmacy, Stan's 
Card and Gift Shop, Granite 
Cooperative Bank, Wheel House 
Diner, Dudley Furniture and 
Appliances, Francette's Pet 
Shop, Nesco TV, Walsh's 
Restaurant, Hussey Radio Shop 
and Hogan's Exxon. 



Norfolk Tourist Council Elects 4 New Directors 



John C. Nourse, Director 
Norfolk County Development 
and Tourist Council, announces 
the election of four new 
members to the Board of 
Directors of the Council. They 
are: 

Miss Irene C. Ross of 
Tri-Travel, Inc., Travel Agency, 
Hanover Mall; William A. 
O'Connell of Quincy, former 
executive sec re tary 
Quincy-South Shore Chamber of 
Commerce and presently serving 
as vice-president Quincy 
Historical Society; A. Franklin 
Swift Jr., of Norwood, former 
Norwood selectman and a 
current member of the Norwood 
Industrial Development 
Commission, and Roger C. Rao, 




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The recently organized 
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Page 18 Quincy Sun Thursday, January 24, 1974 



Salem Lutheran Church 
To Celebrate 85th Anniversary 



The Salem Lutheran Church 
of 201 Granite St., Quincy, will 
observe its 85th anniversary 
Sunday Jan. 27. 

A commemorative service will 
be at 10 a.m. with Dr. Eugene A. 
Brodeen, President of the New 
England Synod of the Lutheran 
Church of Americas as guest 
speaker. 



The choir will present 
appropriate music for the 
occasion led by Mrs. Ethel Berg, 
Minister of Music. One of the 
numbers will be a poem, "Now 

is the time", by B. Bernard 
Turnquist, a member of the 
congregation with music by 
Edward B. Whittredge of Milton, 



noted composer and organist. A 
coffee hour will be held after the 
service in the vestry. 

Mr. Turnquist is committee 
chairman and Charisse Collins is 
secretary. Committee members 
include Alex Erickson, Nancy 
Cedarstrom, Carl Johnson, 
Dorothy Johnson, Elaine Cook 
and Evelyn Lindquist. 



CYO 



Quincy Deanery 
To Induct Officers Sunday 



Quincy Deanery CYO will 
hold a general meeting Sunday 
from 1 to 3 p.m. at St. John's 
School Hall, Phipps St., Quincy 
Center. 

Delegates from 30 parishes in 
the Deanery will be present to 
witness the induction of the 
following officers and members 
of the executive board: 

President, James Keenan, St. 
John's, Quincy; vice-president, 
Michelle Abbruzzese, St. 
Anthony's, Cohasset; secretary, 
Sharon Donahue, Our Lady of 
Good Counsel, Merrymouth; 
treasurer, Joseph Mullin, St. 
Agatha's, Milton; accy delegate, 
Jane Waters, St. John's, Quincy; 



athletic chairmen, Diane 
D'Olimpio, St. John's, Quincy 
and Thomas McNamara, St. 
Ann's, Wollaston. 

Communications chairmen, 
Albert Buckley, St. Anthony's, 
Cohasset and Brian McNamara, 
St. Ann's, Wollaston. 

Social chairmen, Mary Ford, 
St. Joseph's, Quincy Point and 
Marilyn Stewart, St. John's, 
Quincy. 

Spiritual chairmen, Michael 
Earls, St. Agatha's, Milton and 
John Holivar, St. Joseph's, 
Holbrook. 

Moderator is Rev. Joseph M. 
Connolly, St. John's, Quincy. 



The Quincy Deanery CYO is 
comprised of all CYO's in 
Quincy, Milton, Braintree, 
Holbrook, Randolph, 
Weymouth, Scituate, Hull, 
Cohasset, Norwell, Hingham. 

Reports of CYO activities and 
projects will be given by the 
Deanery delegate from each 
parish. 

Other items on the agenda 
will include voting on 
amendments, to the Deanery 
constitution, Deanery leadership 
course, Feb. 15 - 16, "The Step 
For Life" April 28, overnights, 
"Searches for Christian 
Maturity" program, standings in 
girls and boys basketball. 



St. Boniface To Present 'The Good Old Days 9 



St. Boniface Parish will 
present a minstrel and variety 
show "The Good Old Days" on 
Jan. 26, 27 and 28 at 8:30 p.m. 



in the Broad Meadows Junior 
High School. 

The director is Ed Rooney 
with choreography by Marianne 



Dennis. 

Tickets at $2.50 are available 
at the St. Boniface rectory. 




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DEATHS 



Thomas V. Cady, 50, of 15 A 
School St., at Quincy City 
Hospital, Jan. 14. 

Mrs. Jennie [Connors] Birnie, 
84, of 184 Furnace Brook 
Parkway, on arrival at Quincy 
City Hospital, Jan. 14. 

Pickering D. Stone, 84, of 
Weston, formerly of Quincy, at a 
nursing home in Weston, Jan. 
13. 

John A. MacLeod, 52, of 37 
David Rd, Rockland, formerly 
of Quincy, in Braiitree, Jan. 15. 

Mrs. Anna {Maxwell} Irwin, 
81, formerly of Quincy, at an 
out-of-town hospital, Jan. 13. 

John W. Anthony, 58, of 28 
Winslow Rd, at Quincy City 
Hospital, Jan. 14. 

Mrs. Minnie R. /HardwickJ 
Morrison, 84, of 165 Washington 
St., unexpectedly at Quincy City 
Hospital, Jan. 15. 

Mrs. Margaret M. /Gunnixg/ 
Fish, 69, of East Elm Ave., at 
the U.S. Public Health Hospital, 
Brighton, Jan. 13. 

Arthur R. Arvidson, 67, of 33 
Cranch St., unexpectedly at 
home, Jan. 15. 

Miss Mary Z. Joyce, 85, of 49 
California Ave., at Quincy City 
Hospital, Jan. 15. 

Ernest P. Bulger, 71, of 242 
Safford St., at Quincy City 
Hospital, Jan. 14. 

Mrs. Elsie A. /Whitehead/ 
Price, 77, of 35 Vane St., in a 
Quincy nursing home, Jan. 15. 

Miss Edna Woodsum, 88, of 
215 Adams St., at home, Jan. 
15. 

Loreto Cedrone, 71, of 
Brighton, fonnerly of Quincy, at 
his home, Jan. 1 1. 

Mrs. Jennie O. [SunnellJ 
Koski, 21 Garfield St., at Quincy 
City Hospital, Jan. 16. 



!>"•_• ••_•_•„•.•..•, 



■ Ji.^Mh^^fc* fc » ■ 



•»»»»» 



Leo S. Hibbard, 73, of 79 
Exeter St., at his home, Jan. 1 7. 

Charles J. Mem, 66, formerly 
of Quincy, at an out-of-town 
hospital, Jan. 16. 

Henry J. Maxwell, 57, of 211 
S. Nth St., Quincy, III., 
formerly of Quincy, Mass., Dec. 
31, 1973. 

Anthony Martin, 79, of 
Brockton, formerly of Quincy, 
at New England Deaconess 
Hospital, Jan. 16. 

Lawrence A. Young, 78, of 32 
Worthen Ave., Weymouth, 
formerly of Quincy, at a local 
nursing home, Jan. 18. 

Archibald D. Tobin, 88, of 
1 76 Wilson A ve. , at home, Jan. 
18. 

Edward L. Stewart, 80, of 35 
Richie Rd, at Quincy City 
Hospital, Jan. 1 7. 
. Cosimo Cataldo, 80, of 134 
main St., at an out-of-town 
hospital, Jan. 18. 

John A. Ross, 82, of Shore 
Road, Plymouth, formerly of 
Quincy, at a local hospital, Jan. 
18. 

Mrs. Edith /Brown} Crosman, 
79, of 284 High St., Hanson, 
formerly of Quincy, at 
Plymouth County Hospital, Jan. ' 
20. 

Thomas M. McWhirter, 77, of 
1000 Southern Artery, at 
Quincy City Hospital, Jan. 19. 

Noel J. St. Pierre Sr., 60, of 
Quincy, in Florida, Jan. 1 7. 

Roger C Satterlund, 57, of 
159 Summer St., Weymouth, 
formerly of Quincy, at South 
Shore Hospital, Weymouth, Jan 
19. 

Ralph T. Green, 74, of 20 
Bishop Rd, at Quincy City 
Hospital, Jan. 19. 

Axel Youngquist, 89, of 18 
Lawn Ave., at Quincy City 
Hospital, Jan. 19. 



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Thursday, January 24, 1974 Quincy Sun Page 19 




Named MVP 



Varrasso Receives 
MacLean Award At 

Father's Banquet 



THE O'BRIEN CLUB basketball team of Quincy, Cranberry League leader, is one of the top semi-pro 
teams in the state. Front, left to right, Ed Miller, Allan Dalton, Coach Leo Papile, Mike Greenlaw and 
Mike Dunn. Back row. Bob McNamara, Rich Sprague, Paul Gulliksen, John Hassan, Peter Schmid and 
Ron Bradley. Miller, Papile, Greenlaw, Sprague, Gulliksen and Bradley are all former North Quincy High 
stars. Missing from photo is Moe Schoepher. 

O'Brien Club Seeks 14th Straight Friday 



The undefeated O'Brien Club 
basketball team of Quincy, 
Friday night will seek its 14th 
straight win, 13th in the 
Cranberry League, when it goes 
to Fall River to face the Bristol 
County Cavaliers. 

Sunday at 7:30 p.m. the 
O'Brien's will host the Haynes 
Club Bruins of Boston, another 
of the state's better teams, in a 
non-league game at North 
Quincy High. Admission is free. 



Last Sunday the Quincy tearu 
rolled over the Weymouth 
Alphas, 101-77, as Alan Dalton 
scored 21 points, Eddie Miller 
20, Pete Schmidt 16 and Bob 
McNamara 13. Quincy led all the 
way and was never in serious 
danger. 

Last week the O'Brien Club 
had what Coach Leo Papile 
called "the best game of the 
year" as it toppled the Plymouth 



A.A., 121-100, at Plymouth. 

Miller had a big night with 32 
points, followed by Schmid with 
27 and Ron Bradley with 18. 

The O'Brien Club will sponsor 
a tournament starting March 2 at 
Quincy YMCA with 16 of the 
top teams in New England 
participating. Papile announced 
he has received permission to 
hold the evsnt at the Y and is 
now sending out invitations. 



Mike Varrasso was named the 
Most Valuable Player on the 
1973 Quincy High football team 
and was presented the Munroe 
MacLean Award at last Saturday 
night's 17th annual Quincy 
Fathers Club awards banquet in 
the Voc-Tech cafeteria. 

Other presentations included 
the Jack Granville Award to 
Robin Carrera for the best 
player in the Quincy-North 
Quincy game, the Moscardelli 
Award to Wayne Ponder for best 
offensive back, Underwood 
Award to Jim French for best 
offensive lineman, Primivera 
Award to Billy Joyce for best 
defensive back, Presidents 
Award to Dave Sten for best 
defensive lineman, and Grasso 



Memorial Award, given by the 
Class of 1965 to Steve Burke for 
unsung hero. 

The club presented an award 
to Dr. James Brudno, who is 
retiring after several years as the 
team's doctor. 

Coach Hank Conroy 
presented footballs to Rich 
Folino, Bob O'Neil and Bob 
Pettiti for best players in the 
Maiden, Chelsea and Somerville 
games respectively. 

The principal speaker was 
Gayton Salvucci, an all-time 
backfield great at Quincy High 
and American International 
College, later head coach of 
football at AIC and currently 
backfield coach at Holy Cross. 



Venezia, Smith Tie For Lead 



Green, Gold Teams In St. Joseph's Wins 



In St. Joseph's Hockey 
League action last week at the 
Shea Rink, the Green team won 
its first game, edging the Blues, 
4-3. 

In the other game the Reds 
suffered only their second loss 
of the year, being nipped by the 
Gold team, 4-3. 

Great goal tending by the 
Green team's JimMcCarthy held 
off a late Blue surge to preserve 
the team's first win. Scoring for 
the Greens were Dave McQuade 
with two goals, Frank Clarke 
and Jim Connors. Mark Walker 
scored twice and Paul Veneziano 
once for the Blues. 

The second game matched the 
first and second place teams and 
brought the Gold team to within 
two points of the Reds. 



Gold scorers were Dean 
Gambino with two goals, Dan 
McCormick and Mike Grogan. 



John Ford had two goals and 
Joe Coombs one for the Red 
team. 



Venezia Insurance and the 
Body Smith Shop are tied for 
the Women's Merchants Bowling 
League lead with 84-52 records. 

South Shore Candy is third 
with 83-61, followed by 
Chiminiello Oil, 79-65; Pepe's 
Express, 54-90; Merrymount 
Lanes, 48-96. 

Edna Walker leads the Top 10 
with a 104.4 average, followed 
by Ellie lacobucci, 101.8; 



Noreen Mastroianni, 100.0; Bev 
Putnam, 99.8; Ann Casanova, 
99.2; Terry Spencer, 97.6; 
Elaine Rozanski, 97.2; Taffy 
Serroni, 96.9; Nan Magee, 96.6, 
and Sandy Barrie, 96.3. 

Chiminiello has high team 
three of 1495 and high team 
single of 518. Nan Magee has 
high individual three of 340 and 
high individual single of 1 19. 



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Page 20 Quincy Sun Thursday, January 24, 1974 



Girls Basketball 

Quincy Now 3-6, North 4-4 



By TOM SULLIVAN 

Last year the Quincy High 
girls' basketball team won the 
Greater Boston League 
championship with an 11-1 
record and North Quincy 
finished second with a 9-3 mark. 

This year Quincy won't equal 
that record and North may have 
its hands full trying to equal its 
mark in the rivals' final GBL 
season. Like all other Quincy 
and North teams, the girls move 
into the Surburban League next 
season. 

Going into Tuesday's games 
the First Ladies had a 3-6 record 
while the Raiderettes were 4-4. 

"This year we have a 
good-sized team with much 
potential and only time and 
more experience will show how 
we will do," said Quincy Coach 
Gale Palmer. "We lost five 
starters last year by graduation, 
thus depleting our roster. 
However, the First Ladies don't 
give up. They know they have to 
work harder to make up 'for 
their youth and inexperience." 

Diane Congdon wears the 
number of her sister Debbie, one 
of those who graduated. Only a 
sophomore, Diane has a big 
number to live up to. She is 
currently playing junior varsity 
ball. 

Sophomore Cindy Tozzi 
wears the number vacated by 
Betsy Witt and she shows signs 
of having Betsy's aggressiveness 
and know-how. 

The others who graduated, 
leaving gaping holes, were Kathy 
llacqua, Jean Macchi and Debbie 
Spillane. 

"Donna Brickley and Kathy 



Bennett contributed as much as 
anyone to last year's 
championship team," Miss 
Palmer added. "They are the 
leaders this year and will be 
called upon all season for their 
poise, skill and experience." 

The only other player with 
varsity experience is Susan 
Higgins. She, Misses Brickley and 
Bennett and Marilyn Silverstein 
are the only seniors. They are 
joined by juniors Terry Tucker 
and Andrea Leiblein, up from 
last year's jayvees, and 
sophomores Kelly Sparks, Kathy 
Keating and Miss Tozzi. 

Quincy is 2-3 in the GBL and 
3-6 overall. Before their 29-26 
loss to North Quincy, the First 
Ladies had defeated Chelsea and 
Revere in the league and 
Brockton in a non-league game, 
while losing to Medford in the 
league and to Weymouth North 
and Weymouth South outside 
the league. Since the North game 
they lost to Brockton outside 
the league and to Maiden in the 
league. 

"it looks like a scramble for 
this year's championship," the 
Quincy coach said. "Maiden and 
Revere have new coaches and 1 
think North Quincy will make a 
run for it, despite the loss of 
Leslie Runge, one of last year's 
standouts. Maiden and Medford 
look strong. 

"We may play the role of 
spoiler but, as ladies are always 
unpredictable, don't count the 
First Ladies Out." 

North Quincy Coach Barbara 
Webster has four girls with 
varsity experience but one, 
Debbie Matson, 5-10 center. 



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missed the last two games with 
Maiden and Quincy. The 
Raiderettes' coach has four 
sophomores and their 
inexperience has been 
noticeable. 

Sparking the Raiderettes is 
Denise Bereszniewicz, high 
scoring veteran, while Lynne 
Tabor has given her good scoring 
support. Cathy Conroy and Miss 
Matson are the others with 
varsity experience. 

Rounding out the varsity 
squad are Cheryl Walsh and 
sophomores Lainie Shea, Nancy 
Willard, Terry Conroy and 
Sherry Beavens. 

Following the big win over 
Quincy, the Raiderettes romped 
over Revere, 70-40, with Miss 
Breszniewicz scoring 26 points. 
Before those games they had 
defeated Everett in the league 
and Arlington outside the league 
and lost close contests to Maiden 
in the league and to Weymouth 
South and Waltham in outside 
games. Since then they lost to 
undefeated Weymouth North in 
a non-leaguer. They are 3-1 in 
the league and 4-4 overall. 

The rival junior varsity 
squads, made up mainly of 
sophomores with a few juniors, 
are gaining valuable experience 
and should send up some good 
players to the varsity next year. 

The Quincy jayvee squad 
includes Lorri DeCoste, Paula 
King, Maureen Duggan, Betsy 
Engleman, Valarie King, Patty 
Kelly, Diane Congdon, Rose 
Maloney, Mary Deery, Delores 
Connors, Sue Ryan, Anne 
Baccari and Terry Greenleaf. 

The North junior varsity 
players are Nancy Laing, Jean 
McCarthy, Susan Johnson, Mary 
Ann Dunn, Diane Dunn, Joslyn 
Riley, Saralee Cobban, Julie 
Adams, Helen Thompson, Doris 
Aiken,' Ann Dolan and Holly 
Spanks. 



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Squirt House 

Nardone, Maher, 
Mclnnis Win 



In the Squirt House League, 
Nardone Aluminum defeated 
Hannon Tire, 5-3. 

Al Divincentis and Mike 
Cullen had two goals each and 
John Lyons the other for 
Nardone, while Lyons chipped 
in with four assists, Divincentis, 
Paul Furey and Steve Burns one 
each. 

For Hannon, Fran 
McCormack, Frank Maloney and 
Jim Seymoure scored and 
Charlie McManus had two 
assists, Jim Ferrara and Tony 
Quintillani one each. 

Maher Plumbing topped Dee 
Dees, 4-3. Rich McCarthy scored 
twice for Maher and Kevin 
McSweeney and Ted Duggan had 
one each. Keith Blaney and 
McCarthy had assists. Dee Dees 
scorers were Richie Durhan, 



Tom Richards and Bob Bolster. 
Rich Penzo had an assist. 

McCann Steel and Howard 
Back Realty played to a 2-2 tie. 
Frank McPartlin and Matt 
Kenney scored for McCann and 
Jay Princiotta and Kevin 
McCormick had assists. Scoring 
for Back were Greg Freeman and 
Joe McKenna with Steve Healy 
and Paul Healy assisting. 

Mclnnis Contractor edged 
Kyes Meat Supply, 4-3. Dave 
Hickey, Tony Chiochio, Mike 
Chiochio and Jim Paolucci 
scored for Mclnnis, with Tony 
Chiochio having two assists and 
Ed Campbell one. Goals for 
Kyes were scored by Brian 
Radzig, Dave Clifford and Tom 
Hennessey with assists for Pat 
Doherty and Gary Durante. 



Squirt A's Tie Scituate, 3-3 



The Squirt A team played to a 
Bay Collony Association 3-3 tie 
with Scituate with Mike Doherty 
scoring twice and Karl Nord 
once. 

Assists went to Neil Shea and 
Kevin Craig. Kenny Mann 
excelled in the Quincy goal. 

In a scrimmage, the Squirt A 
team edged Brookline, 3-2, on 



goals by Mark Boussey, Mike 
Doherty and Chuckie Marshall. 
Assists went to Doherty with 
two, Neil Shea, Karl Nord and 
Kevin Craig. Outstanding on 
defense were Tommy Heffernan, 
Mike Hussey, John Carty, Kevin 
Chase, Mike Quigg and Danny 
Flynn. 



Pee Wee B's Edge Rockland 



Seven different players 
figured in the scoring Sunday as 
the Quincy Pee Wee "B" team 
edged Rockland, 4-3, in a Bay 
Colony Hockey Association 
game. Quincy's league record is 



now 1 5 wins and a tie. 

Jeff Giordani, John Jackson, 
Dan Sullivan and Len Miceli got 
the goals and Dan Cronin, Ken 
Halloran and Tom Connolly had 
the assists. 



QYHA Yearbook On Sale 



The Quincy Youth Hockey 
Yearbooks will go on sale Friday 
at the Quincy Youth Hockey 
Arena. 

The book contains a history 
of the Quincy Youth Hockey 
Association from its inception in 
1965 and pictures of all "A" and 



"B" teams and House League 
clubs that played in the 1972-73 
season. 

The books will be on sale for 
$1 each on Friday, 4 p.m. to 8 
p.m.; Saturday, 9 a.m. to 8 p.m.; 
and Sunday, 9 a.m. to 7 p.m. 



JOHN FITZGERALD PACES BANTAM B'S 



John Fitzgerald's two goals 
paced the Quincy Bantam "B" 
team to a 4-1 victory over 



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Randolph in Bay Colony 
Hockey Association action 
Saturday. 

Mark Kelly and John Andrews 
got the other goals and Mark 
Paolucci, Dave Lewis and Jim 
McConville were credited with 
assists. 

MITE B'S WIN, 6-0 

The Mite B team blanked 
Braintree, 6-0, in a Bay Colony 
Hockey Association game as 
Paul Marshall scored twice and 
Mike Riley, Dickie Tapper, Chris 
Harrington and Joe Harte once 
each. Assists went to Marshall 
with two, Riley, Tapper, 
Harrington, Jack Gabriel and 
Dennis Cronin. 



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• Bantam House 

Blackwood Ups Lead; 
Sun Wins 4th In Row 



Thursday, January 24, 1974 Quincy Sun Page 21 



In the Bantam House League 
Blackwood Pharmacy increased 
its lead over Trucks of Quincy to 
four points as it edged South 
Shore TV, 3-2, while Trucks was 
losing to Burgin Platner, 2-1. 

Goals for Blackwood were 
scored by Pat Cummings, Rich 
Fidler and Brian Simmons with 
John Riodin and Dana Chivaroli 
having assists. South Shore's 
scorer was Ed DiRamio with 
both goals and assists going to 
Shawn Murray, Rick McCarter, 
Jeff Harrison and John Dunn. 

Pete Plant and Mike Storer 
scored for Burgin, Platner and 
Ribbie Panico, Pat Bamberry 
and Steve Hale had assists. The 
lone goal for Trucks was scored 
by Pete Cassidy. 

The Quincy Sun, defending 
champions, which lost four of its 
first five games, continued its 
red hot streak as it bombed 
Johnson Motors, 9-0, for its 
fourth straight win. Paul 
Guadiano excelled in goal. 
Scoring were Dave Palazza with 
two goals, Rick Boyle, Mike 
Boyle, Gary Trenholm, Bobby 
Kenney, Steve Canavan, Kevin 

• Midget House 



Whalen and Doug McDonald 
with assists by Mike Pitts, Mike 
Boyle, two; Steve Canavan, Ed 
Murphy, Bob Kenney, Gary 
Trenholm and Dave Palazza. 

Noonan Press walloped 
Bersani Brothers, 8-3, as John 
Picard and Paul Vallanti had hat 
tricks and Charlie Larkin and 
Lennie Picot had one goal each. 
Rich Ahola ^nd Eddie Laracy 
had three assists apiece, Picot 
two, Scott Goslin, Kenny 
Kustka and Tom Pistorino one 
each. .Mike Soldano, Kurt 
O'Sullivan and Mike Farrell 
scored for Bersani with Don 
Ford, Bud Lombardo, Jim 
Laberge and Kurt O'Sullivan 
having assists. 



Baskin Robbins tied Doran 
and Horrigan, 3-3. Baskin goals 
were scored by Dave O'Brien, 
Mike Marella and Mike Van 
Tassell with assists by Bob 
McCarthy and John Dolbec. 
Goals for Doran were scored by 
Charlie Dedian with two and 
Kevin Doyle with Mike Welch, 
Bruce Brennan and Stan 
Campbell assisting. 



Rich's, Cox Tie, 3-3, 
Fire, Police Dept. Win 



In the Midget House League, 
Rich's South Shore Express tied 
Cox Rambler, 3-3. 

Rick Dorney, Gerry McGrath 
and Ron Hennessey scored for 
Cox with assists by Wally 
Glendye, Bill Pitts, Rick Dorney 
and Frank Shea. Game pucks 
went to Dorney and goalie Rich 
Buccheri. Rich's goals were 
scored by Tony Alessi with two 
and Paul Duggan. Tom Ward and 
Bud Jefferies had assists. 

Quincy Fire Dept. defeated' 
Tiffany Realty, 3-1, as Kevin 
Pitts scored two goals and Jerry 



DeLuca one. Assists went to 
Mark DeLuca with two and Mike 
Doherty. Kevin Murphy had the 
Tiffany goal and Brad Harland 
assisted. 

Quincy Police edged 
Suburban Disposal, 3-2, on goals 
by Mark Walsh, Bob Page and 
Pat Downey. Jerry Cronin, Page, 
Mike Griffin, Dan Barry and 
Greg Dillon had assists. 
Suburban goals were scored by 
Joe O'Keefe and Brian Croke 
with Croke, O'Keefe and Tom 
Parke assisting. 



Squirt B's Romp, 8-0 



The Squirt B team romped 
over Holbrook, 8-0, in the Bay 
Colony Association as Mike 
McNiece and Bobby Kelley had 
two goals apiece. 

Danny Boyle, Timmy Ryan, 
Kevin Ryan and Paul McCabe 



had the other goals while Boyle 
and Johnny Cummings had two 
assists each, Richie Stevens, 
Brian Sullivan, Ryan, McCabe 
and Chris Gorman one each. 

The Squirt B team now has a 
12-2-0 record. 




ACTION AT NET -- Three Quincy Pee Wees [dark jerseys] are poised for a rebound that never came as 
the Cohasset goalie made the save in a recent Bay Colony Hockey Association game. The Quincy boys 
are [left to right] Scott Richardson, Mark Messina and Robbie Craig. Quincy won, 6-2. 

• Pee Wee House 

Wollaston, Davis, Teachers, 
Morrisette Rack Up Wins 



In Pee Wee House action, 
Wollaston Theater defeated 
Keohane's, 3-1. 

John Coleman, John DeLuca 
and Kevin Gallo scored for the 
winners with Gallo, Jim 
Hennessey and Paul Zinga having 
assists. For Keohane's the goal 
was scored by Bernie Van Tassel 
with John Furey and John 
Newcomb assisting. 

Davis Insurance edged Team 
Quincy, 2-1, on goals by Fddie 



Powers and John McKay. Assists 
went to Fran Straughn and John 
Lyons. Mike McNally scored for 
Team Quincy with an assist for 
William Mathew. 

Morrisette Post blanked UCT, 
5-0, with Tom McIIugh starring 
in goal. Jay Collins had two 
goals, Bob McHugh, Steve 
Whittemore and Frank 
O'Connor one each. Assists went 
to Whittemore and Mike Whalen 
with two each, Jeff Taylor, 



Frank O'Connor, Billy Allen, 
Paul Dunphy and Jim McHugh. 
Quincy Teachers nipped 
Harold Club, 3-2. Mark Walsh 
had two goals and Mike Alcott 
one for the teachers with Kevin 
Cobban and Tommy Mullen 
having two assists each and John 
Livingstone one. Bob Thomas 
and Dick Newcomb scored for 
Harold with assists to Bob 
Palermo with two and Jim 
Rooney. 



Cahill, Schaeffer, Bertoni Spark Bantam A's 



The Quincy Bantam "A" 
team's line of Tommy Cahill, 
Matt Schaeffer and Brian 
Bertoni had themselves quite a 
time in the Bay Colony Hockey 
Association last week. 

Along with defenseman Mike 
Smith they accounted for all the 



goal and all the assists as Quincy 
walloped Weymouth, 6-0, 
Wednesday and tied Brockton, 
2-2, Saturday. 

Schaeffer had two goals and 
two assists, Cahill a goal and 
three assists, Bertoni two goals 
and Smith one goal in the 
Weymouth game. Goalie Jeff 



Nord recorded 
shutout. 



his eighth 



Cahill and Schaeffer had the 
goals and Bertoni and Smith the 
assists in the deadlock with 
Brockton. 

Quincy's record is now 
23-6-1. 



Pee Wee A's Win Pair, 4-1, 3-1 



The Pee Wee A team came up 
with two wins in the Bay Colony 
Association, defeating Scituate, 
4-1, and Canton, 3-1. 

Against Scituate Tommy 
Brennan had two goals, Bobby 
Hayes and Johnny Mullin one 
each. Assisting were Leo Doyle, 
Bob Hayes, Eddie Kane, Brian 
Norton, Bryan McGillvray and 
Paul McGrath. 

Against Canton Norton, 



McGilvray and Scott Richardson 
had the goals and Kevin 
McGrath and Mark Messina 
assisted. Dean Prescott and 
Bobby Tierney were outstanding 
in goal. 

The Pee Wee A team added 
two more victories, topping 
Brockton, 3-1, and Cohasset, 
6-2. 

Scoring against Brockton were 
Paul McDermott, Johnny Mullin 



and Scott Richardson with 
assists by Bobby Hayes, Paul 
McGrath, Bryan McGilvray and 
Robbie Craig. 

Against Cohasset Hayes had 
two goals, Tommy Brennan, 
Eddie Kane, Brian Norton and 
Mark Messina one each. George 
Mackey, Brennan, Kane, Mullin, 
Craig, Richardson and Mike 
Furey had assists. 




Page 22 Quincy Sun Thursday, January 24, 1974 

• Koch Club Bowling 

Pino, Moody Teams Tie 
In Men's League First Half 



The Koch Club Men's Bowling 
League enjoying its 24th season, 
finished in a two-way tie for first 
place at the close of the first 
half. 

Jim Pino's team and Jim 
Moody's team finished in a dead 
heat with a 65-39 identical 
record, both teams will roll off 
at the close of the season to 
decide the first half winner. 

Pino's team included Paul 



Tanofsky, John Giunta and Jeff 
Askin, while rounding out 
Moody's squad was Bill Eklund, 
Dave Geary and John Pascuicco. 
Top ten bowlers in the 40 
man loop include Laurie Eklund 
115.5, John O'Malley 109.9, 
Norm Greenfield 108.9, Al 
Mancuso 108, Burt Cristina 
107.0, Jim Jordan 105.0, Jim 
Moody 103.4, Jim Pino 102.8, 
Paul Tanofsky 102.2, and Walter 
Zukauskas 102. 



High Individual Three String 
total is held by Laurie Eklund 
390, while Al Mancuso has Top 
Individual Single String 159. 

John O'Malley's team has Top 
Honors in the team three string 
total with 1 286, and team single 
of 456. 

The League bowls every 
Tuesday evening at 7 p.m. at the 
Merrymount Daylight Alleys, 
and has ten teams with four 
members on each. 



Flynn Team Wins First Half 
In Women's League 



In the Koch Club Women's 
Bowling League, now in its 20th 
season. Helen Flynn's team 
captured the first half with a 
79-41 record, while Mary Ellen 
Lorizio's No. 2 was runnerup 
with 72-48. 

Helen Flynn was assisted in 
her first half win by team mates 
Ellen McAdam, Fran Darcy, 
Jerry Delmonico and Margaret 
Getti. 



Top ten bowlers of the 
women's loop include Rosemary 
Earley 98.36, Helen Flynn 
96.20, Linda Koch 95.28, 
Simmy Koch 94.38, Mary Ellen 
Lorizio 93.38, Nancy Bowes 
92.41. Betty Ann Koch 92.37, 
Barbra Lombardi 92.19, Marion 
Tobin 92.9 and Claire Fitch 
90.28. 

Rosemary Earley holds High 
Individual Honors of High 
Individual Three of 335 and high 



single of 133, while Linda Koch 
has posted the most spares 72, 
and Jerry Delmonico the most 
strikes, 14. 

Rosemary Earley's team lead 
in team honors with a 1442 high 
team three string total, and a 
5 1 2 team single. 

The League bowls every 
Thursday evening at the 
Merrymount Daylihgt Alleys, 
with 50 women participating. 



• In Little Loop 

Montclair Club Climbs To 2nd 



3-1 



The Montclair Men's Club's 
win over the George Burke 
Club moved it into second place 
in the Quincy Bowling Little 
Loop, only two points behind 
the Joseph E. Brett Club. 

Montclair also set a new high 
three mark for the second week 
in a row, rolling 1337. 

Brett leads the league with a 
35-18 record and total pinfall of 
15,812. Montclair is 33-19 
[16.000), followed by Dick 
Morrissey Club, 32-20 [16,046]; 



Granite Lodge 1451, 30-22 
[15,549]; Atlantic Fuel Oil, 
28-24 1 15,8481 ; Hutchinson Oil, 
28-24 (15,641); Wollaston 
Bowladrome, 28-24 [15,583]; 
Hennessy Plumbing Supply, 
25-27 [15,512]; Bryan Post 
VFW, 23-29 [15,531]; DA 
Burke, 22-30 [15,471]; Hal 
Davis Club, 22-30 [15,289]; 
Quincy Lodge of Elks, 20-32 
[15,562]; Local 513 AFL-CIO, 
19-33 [15,415]; James R. 
Mclntyre Club, 18-34 [15,435]. 



Dan Finn has high average, 
97.4 followed by Nick Anastas, 
97.15; Mike Regan, 96.28; Brian 
Connolly, 94.26; Dick Kelty, 
91.8; Jim McAllister, 90.22; 
John Andrews, 90.20; Larry 
McGrath, 90.7; Kev Mullaney, 
89.34 and Ken Allman, 89.29. 

Montclair has high team three 
of 1337 and high team single of 
469. Anastas of Montclair has 
high individual three of 312 and 
high single of 1 19. 



Tolson Scores 4 To Spark 
Golds In Executive Loop 



Marty Tolson scored four 
goals and added an assist to 
spark the Golds to a 6-1 win 
over the Blue team in Executive 



League action Sunday. 

Art Boyle and Tom Roberts 
also scored for the Golds and 
Boyle had three assists, Paul 




The day John Havlicek 
played a game . . . 
and made all the calls. 

We at Dial Finance wanted to 
prove something. We ap- 
proached John Havlicek and 
proposed that he play a little 
game with us. We asked him 
10 call any Dial office in the 
Boston area at random. We 
told him to ask any questions 
about loans that popped into 
his head and not to give his 
name. No Dial personnel were 
alerted about what we were 
doing. Here, in Johns words, is what happened. 

"As I was dialing the number. I thought this was a pretty 
bold idea for Dial. After all. they didn't know v. hat I might 
ask. 

"Well, almost as fast as the phone rang, it was answered J 
told the guy I was interested in a $4,000 loan and I wanted 
to know how long I could take to pay it back. He told me. 
I asked him how quickly I could get the cash. He told me. I 
asked what the total amount I would have to pay back on the 
loan would be. He told me. Then I threw in a 'loaded' ques- 
tion. I had heard that finance company interest rates are 
high, so I came right out and asked him about Dial rates. 
What I found out was that you can probably borrow for less 
some places. Like a bank maybe But Dial charges a lot less 
than I thought Ihey would. 

"I was ama/ed. I mean, he didn't even ask for my name. 
And there wasn't any sales pitch. He just helped me -with 
no strings attached." 

The kind of service and consideration John Havlicek 
received isn't reserved just for basketball stars. It's 
reserved for everybody, and has been since 1897. So next 
time you're thinking o\' borrowing, think of Dial Finance. 
You see. we don't want you to like usjusi for our money. 

Visit Dial's Randolph office at }12 V Main Street, 
1 ernandes Shopping (enter, phone 963-0400 or the Brock- 
ton office at 726 Crescent Street. Brockton East Shopping 
Plaza, phone 583-3420 Other Dial irfices: 3 downtown, 
Billenca. Lynn. Maiden. Walpole. 



Hussey two and Roberts one. 
The only Blue goal was scored 
by Kevin White with Harry 
Messina assisting. 

Ralph Freeman and Jack 
Hurley each had a hat trick and 
added three assists to spark the 
Red team over the Greens, 8-3. 
Charlie Duffy and Kenny 
Halloran each scored once and 
had three assists. For the Green 
team Tom Boussy, Joe Chase 
and John McGillvary scored with 
McGillvary, Buckie Zanardelli, 
Bernie Toland and Lennie Picot 
having assists. 

The Executive League has 
changed the times of its games. 
The first will start at 8:15 p.m. 
and the second at 9:30. Next 
Sunday's first game will find the 
Red and Blue teams battling for 
first place. 




Quincy Merchants 

High Rollers In 
Candlepin Opening 



The opening round of the 
21st annual Greater Quincy 
Men's Candlepin Bowling 
Tourney sponsored by the Koch 
Club of Quincy, opened Sunday 
afternoon at the Merrymount 
Daylight Alleys, Quincy with six 
teams of the 12 entry surviving. 
The Quincy Merchants 
bowled high for the day to oust 
the Social Club 1775-1597, the 
defending champion Colonial 
Bowl defeated Adams Heights 
Men's Club 1765-1613, Boston 
Gear Works day shift eliminated 
Montclair Men's Club 
1686-1619, tourney host Koch 
Club stopped the Woodshooters 
1635-1554, Penn A.A. turned 
back Blessed Sacrament 
1632-1595, and the Professional 
Men outlasted the Socialites 
1588-1525. 

Quincy Merchants jumped to 
a 73 pin first string lead and 
continued to capture the 2nd 
and 3rd strings for a sweep to 
their 178 pin victory. 

Paul Vickers showed the way 
for the winners with 374, 
followed by Sal Fanara 364, 
Paul Paton 360, Mike Valenti 
354, and Wes Cobb 323. 

Steve Mariani was high for the 
losing Social Club with 330, Bob 
DiGuisto had 328, Willy 
Pasquale 322, George Papile 
317, and John Mariano 300. 

Colonial Bowl edged Adams 
Heights Men by only 4 pins in 
the first string, but displayed 
their championship power firing 
a 610 pin second and third string 
for a 152 pin win. 

Numbering among their team 
several former T.V. candlepin 
bowling stars, Lou Pagnani 
headed the squad with 371, 
while Jim Powers followed with 
366, Bill Nicholson 363, Bill 
Antilla 354, and Ray Pino 311. 
Joe Albasini with 337 was top 
for the losers, Reno Guidici had 
335, Howie Hollis 326, and Bob 
MacLeod 320. 

Boston Gear Works fell 
behind Montclair Men's Club in 
the first string by 13 pins, but 
captured the second and third 
handily for a 67 pin win. 

Gene McCann showed the 
way for the gearmen with 366 
and was aided in the victory by 
Dana Chella 339, Jack Hatfield 
334, Bill Earley 330, and Bruce 
Barrie 3 1 7. 

Montclair Men's Mark Smith 
kept the losers in contention for 
a time, firing a 374, Ed Adams 



chipped in 332, while brother 
Bill Smith and Mike O'Riola had 
313 each. 

The Koch Club picked up a 
51 pin win in the first string, 
added 3 1 pins in the second, and 
dropped the final to the 
Woodshooters, but built up a 
substantial lead to win easily. 

Burt Cristina was high for the 
Koch Club with 348 followed by 
Norm Greenfield 343, Laurie 
Eklund 331, Al Mancuso 313, 
and John O'Malley 300. 

Ken Hanson was top for the 
losing Woodshooters with 332, 
Ted Kaberides 322, Bob Healy 
308, and Jack Doherty 301. 

Penn A.A. dropped the 
opening string by 40 pins to 
Blessed Sacrament, but bounced 
back to capture the second by 
58 and went on to take the final 
by 1 9 pins to guarantee the win. 
Frank Durante with 358 led 
Penn A.A. to victory assisted by- 
Stewart Coull 338, Romeo 
Magnarelli 324, Paul Smyth 309, 
and Frank Perfetuo 303. 

Blessed Sacrament with 333 
of Ron Walker high for the 
losers followed by Joe Amyouny 
329, Larry Bushey 327, and 
Jack Congdon322. 

In the final match of the 
afternoon the Professional Men 
caught the Socialites cold in the 
first string winning by 43 pins, 
dropped the second by 4, but 
came back to capture the final 
by 34 and insure the victory. 

Nick DeNicola led the winners 

with a 348, George Verlicco 

followed with 330, Walter 

Chepetsky. 327, and Bill 

Rjzzotti314. 

Dinny Dinardo was high for 
the losing Socialites with 333, 
while Ed McCallum chipped in 
309, and Sam Grassie 304. 

High three string total for the 
day went to Mark Smith and 
Paul Vickers each with 374, and 
Frank Durante's 149 was high 
single. 

Quincy Merchants 1775 was 
high three string total for the 
day, while Colonial Bowl had 
high team single with two strings 
of610. 

The tourney is annually 
sponsored by the Koch Club of 
Quincy as part of its winter 
athletic and recreation program. 

The remaining 14 entries will 
start next Sunday at 1 p.m. with 
the winners meeting yesterdays 
winners Feb. 3. 



Sacred Heart Defeats 
St. Thomas More, 7-2 




The Sacred Heart, North 
Quincy hockey team defeated 
St. Thomas More, 7-2, Monday 
night at Shea Rink. 

Mike Johnson, Jim Cunniff 
and Scott Williams each had two 



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goals and Billy Bent the other 
for Sacred Heart. Cunniff, Bent, 
Mark Fitzgerald, Bobby Bent 
and Steve Fontaine had assists. 
Joe Gill was in goal for Sacred 
Heart which now has a 2-2 
record. 






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Basketball 



Thursday, January 24, 1974 Quincy Sun Page 23 



Donahue Injury Hurts Quincy; 
Raiders Set For Somerville 



A coach's nightmare--an 
injury to a key player-has 
become a- reality for Quincy's 
first year basketball coach, Joe 
Amorosino, who faces the 
prospect of going the rest of the 
season without his standout 
center, 6-4 Fred Donahue. 

Donahue suffered a 
recurrence of a football injury, 
diagnosed as a shoulder 
separation, in the first minute of 
play in last week's 49-45 loss to 
Maiden at Boston Garden. 

Amorosino hopes the return 
of 6-5 Tom Perry, out most of 
the season, will help make up for 
Donahue's loss. Quincy, now 
tied with three other teams for 
the Greater Boston League lead 
with a 5-2 record [7-3 overall], 
played at Medford Tuesday, 
hosts Revere Friday night and 
Chelsea next Tuesday. 

Meanwhile, Bob Nolan's 
North Quincy team, with a 4-3 
league record and 5-4 overall 
mark, played Everett Tuesday, 
goes to Somerville Friday and to 
Maiden next Tuesday. 

"Losing a boy like Donahue is 
a terrific loss," Amorosino said. 
"Losing him so early in the 
Maiden game caused a noticeable 
letdown. The people on the 
bench just weren't ready to fill 
in for him. "There just wasn't 
anybody to get us Fred's 12 to 
15 rebounds, 10 points and box 
out the way he does. 

"But I'm confident the boys 
will bounce back. 



"Our defense has been 
outstanding all year but we just 
have to improve on our 
shooting. The ball isn't dropping 
in for us. If our offense picks up, 
we will stay up in the league 
standings." 

Quincy was only 19 for 63 
from the floor, a poor 28 
percent, against Maiden. 

Quincy led, 28-24, at halftime 
in the preliminary to the Celtics 
game, but fell behind, 34-33, in 
the third period. 

Mike Cullen with 10 points 
was the only President in double 
figures. Bill Dacey scored nine 
and Tom McKinnon eight. 

North Quincy rebounded 
from a heartbreaking loss and 
raced past Chelsea, 70-32, with 
the Raiders' press killing the Red 
Devils. North had a huge 39-15 
halftime edge and Nolan was 
able to get everyone into the 
game. Twelve of Norths' 13 
players scored. 

Walt Melton and Steve 
Orlando scored 1 1 points apiece 
and John Flynn had 10. 

North's awesome defense 
forced 19 Chelsea turnovers in 
the first half. 

Earlier in the week Quincy 
regained sole possession of first 
place by topping Everett, 57-49. 
Everett had been tied with the 
Presidents for the top spot. 

Quincy started out with some 
hot shooting and its strong 
defense again came to the fore 
to contain Everett. 



Hockey 

Quincy Eyes Tourney Berth; 
North Respectable Season 



While Quincy's hockey team 
continues to battle for a state 
tourney berth, North Quincy 
tries to improve on its record 
and finish with a respectable 
season. 

Quincy, with a 6-3-2 record, 
can lose only two more games or 
be eliminated from the tourney. 
North, with two impressive 
performances in a row, has only 
a 3-6-2 mark but hopes to 
improve on it over the final third 



of the season. 

Last night [Wednesday] Bob 
Sulvia's Quincy skaters met 
Everett. Friday they play 
Chelsea at 6:30 at Boston Arena 
and Tuesday will face 
Somerville, also at 6:30. 

North Friday will play Everett 
and Tuesday will meet Revere in 
the same 6:30 bracket as 
Quincy. 

Ron Erikson's Raiders, 
following a 3-3 tie with Quincy, 
nipped Chelsea, 2-1, Monday 



night when Mike McLean scored 
twice. Sophomore goalie Dave 
O'Hanley turned in his third 
straight superlative performance. 

McLean's first goal, tying the 
game, just beat the first period 
buzzer when he converted Glen 
Hanson's pass. His second came 
with an assist from Paul 
O'Donnell at 1 .46 of the second 
period. McLean hit the post with 
his head following the winning 
shot but was unhurt. 



• St. Ann's Hockey 

Detroit, Flames, Bruins In Wins 



In St. Ann's Hockey League 
Pee Wee action at Shea Rink, 
Detroit defeated New York, 4-J. 
Steve Hogan, Mike Abboud, 
Mike Bridgeman and Frank 
Hogan scored for Detroit with 
Andy Gillis, Dan Rowley, Kevin 
O'Hanley and Abboud assisting. 
Paul Maloney scored for New 
York with an assist for Bob 
Sullivan. 

The Flames topped the 
Northstars, 5-1, with Chris Clark 
exploding for four goals. The 
other was scored by Joe Crifo 
and assists went to Crifo and 
dark. John McCadden scored 
for Northstars unassisted. 

The Bruins rolled over the 
Flyers, 5-1, with Mark Milline 
having three goals. Greg Therrien 
and Greg Kelly also scored with 
assists going to Kelly, Gary 
Stokes, Andy McDonald and 
Ken Johnston. Scoring for the 
Flyers was Paul O'Sullivan with 
[assists by Jim Meehan and Craig 
DiBona. 

•n Bantam games Detroit 
blanked Northstars, 2-0, on goals 
J?y Bill Shine and Ken Olson. 
Mike Therrien and Len Blaney 
assisted. Brian Donovan was 
' '"standing in the Detroit goal. 
New York walloped the 
V Ul 'ns, 6-0, as Kevin O'Connell 
'"red three goals and added an 
Also scoring were Paul 



Howe, Eric Bergstrom and Carl 
Bergstrom. Assists went to 
Frank Kelly, Carl Bergstrom, 
Brian Buckley, Kevin Kelly and 
Paul Schmitt. Mike McColgan 
starred in the New York goal. 

The Flames defeated the 
Flyers, 5-1, with Jack O'Leary 
scoring twice and Gom Nazzaro, 
Joe Carr and John Gravina once 
each. Assists were turned in by 
Nazzaro, Carr, Walter Marshall 
and Gravina. Steve Clinton 
scored for the Flyers with an 



assist for Chuck Winters. 

The St. Ann's Pee Wee 
all-stars played to a 2-2 tie with 
Winthrop as Frank LaPierre and 
Steve Olson scored the St. Ann's 
goals and Clark and Rich 
LaPierre assisted. 

The Bantam all-stars also 
played to a tie with the Blue Hill 
Hockey Club at Weymouth's 
MDC rink. Eric Bergstrom, 
Ricky Carroll and Winters scored 
for St. Ann's and Jim Doherty, 
Joe Condon and Frank LaPierre 
assisted. 



Quincy Girls Lose, Tie 



The Quincy Youth Hockey 
girls' teams played two games 
last week, losing to Pembroke, 
5-3, and tying Kingston, 2-2. 

In the Pembroke game Mary 
Ellen Riordan scored twice and 
Peggy Rugg once with assists by 
Leona Bosader, Beth Coleman 
and Jean Rathgeb. 

Against Kingston the goals 

were scored by Mary Wiedemann 
and Ellen Marr with assists by 



Sharon O'Leary, two; Doreen 
Hayes, Mary Ellen Riordan and 
Terry Flynn. 




SOUTH SHORE 
SKINDIVER 




Complete 
Diving 
Center 



511 WASHINGTON ST. 
773-5452 



Junior High Spotlight 

Central Upsets A-N 
Sterling Takes 2 



The Presidents led, 1 1-6, after 
a period and 31-17 at halftime. 
Everett's big period was the 
third when it cut the gap to 
40-32 but Quincy was never in 
serious danger. 

Don Connors had his biggest 
night for Quincy with 21 points, 
four assists and two steals. Billy 
Joyce 10 points and Cullen nine, 
while Donahue dominated the 
boards. 

North Quincy lost a 66-64 
overtime heartbreaker to 
Medford when it blew two 
layons in the extra session that 
would have spelled victory. 

"It was a seesaw game," 
Nolan said. "We were down by 
eight points going into the final 
period and tied it on a Jed 
Phelan shot with 1:14 left. We 
had the ball with 30 seconds left 
but missed the last shot. 

"In overtime we missed two 
layups and that was that. It was 
nice, though, to see the boys 
come back and tie it but we had 
a bad shooting night with only 
25 for 67 from the floor and 
missed many easy layups." 

Junior Tim Clifford, who has^ 
been one of North's most 
pleasant surprises this year, had 
another big night with 25 points 
and 16 rebounds. Phelan had 15 
points and eight rebounds. 

North's junior varsity, under 
second year coach Eddie Miller, 
continued to roll, 52-40, to hike 
its record to 7-1, as Warren 
Jordan had 12 points, Jay 
Nelson 1 1 and Jack Browne 10 



In last week's Quincy Junior 
High basketball League games 
Central upset Atlantic-North in 
two of their three games. 

The A-N ninth grade team 
won, 38-21, with John White 
scoring nine points, Bill 
Mclntyre seven and Jim 
McGinley six. Dan Cuddy scored 
1 1 and Jimmy Smith six for 
Central. Keith Lindbergh was in 
early foul trouble for A-N and 
Eddie McElaney filled in 
capably. 

Central's eighth graders won, 
27-24, after trailing throughout 
the first half. Steve Germain's 10 
points sparked Central and John 
Timmons scored five, Wink 
Phelan and Bob Evans four each. 
Bobby Doyle had seven points 
and Mike McCormack six for 
A-N. Both teams were 
undefeated before the game. 

Central's seventh grade team 
also won, 19-11, hopping off to 
a 10-2 lead in the first period. 
Robby Nolan and Mark Roberts 
had eight points each. 

Sterling won two of three 
games from Point. The Sterling 
ninth graders won, 31-22, led by 
Mark Buchanan's 10 points 
Eddie Daley also had 
Point. 

The Sterling eighth 
won, 30-18, with John Sylvan 
scoring eight for Sterling and 
Ken Ames and Don Perdios six 
each for Point. 

In the seventh grade game 



10 for 



grade 



Point won, 15-12. Robby 
Gorgan scored eight for Point 
and Bud Marcel nine for 
Sterling. 

Earlier in the week Broad 
Meadows was the winner in two 
of the three games against Point. 
The BM ninth grade team won, 
25-18, as Jack Uhlar had eight 
points, Lyle Morrison six and 
Dave Shields five for BM, while 
Daley and Mike Lamie scored 
seven apiece for Point. 

In the eighth grade game BM 
also won, 15-10, with Billy 
Norton scoring six and Kevin 
Connors four for the winners, 
while Ames had eight for Point. 
Point again salvaged the 
seventh grade game, 16-11. Ray 
Coscia scored six, John Breen 
five and Gorgan four for Point. 
Mark Forrester had six and Bill 
B,urt three for BM. 

Atlantic-North swept all three 
games from Sterling. The ninth 
graders breezed, 44-16, after 
leading by only two points, 
14-12, at the half. John White 
and Lindbergh each scored 10 
points and McGinley eight. Brian 
Sciarini had eight and Buchanan 
seven for Sterling. 

A-N's eighth graders won, 
25-20, led by Joe Deane's 10 
points. Mike Larkin had eight 
and McCormack five. Sylva had 
1 1 for Sterling. 

A-N seventh grade won, 18-8, 
led by Dave King's seven points 
and Larry Baker's three. 



Desmond Takes Termites 
First Half Championship 



Three teams, O'Toole, 
Desmond and Kelly, tied for 
first place in the first half of the 
Koch Club Termites Bowling 
League. 

Maureen O'Toole's team and 
Nancy Desmond's team rolled 
off to break one tie with 
Desmond winning easily. In a 
tight match Nancy Desmond's 
team edged Kathy Kelly's team 
by two points for the first half 
crown. 

Members of Nancy's team are 
Joan Lawlor, Betty Ann Drobia 
and Paula Boyne. Also taking 
part in the roll-offs were Kathy 
Kelly, Mary Fahey, Deirdre 
Simmons, Loretta Garrigan 
Maureen O'Toole, Pamela 
Puzinas, Linda Mahoney and 
Susanne Yovino. 

The final first half standings- 
Kelly, 74-22; Desmond, 74-22; 



O'Toole, 74-22; Monahan, 
66-30; Fronduto, 56-40; Hughes, 
52-44; Boyle, 51-45; Boyne, 
51-45; Quinn, 51-45; Falcetta, 
49-47; Butts, 48-48; Morris, 
47-49; Ryan, 45-51; Flynn, 
45-5 1 ; Rooney, 34-62; Sherlock, 
32-64; McAuley, 31-65; 
Anderson, 30-66; Welch, 25-71, 
and Mullaney, 25-71. 

Maureen O'Toole has high 
average of 89.0, followed by 
Jane Monahan, 85.5; Patty, 
Boyle, 84.2; Nancy Desmond,' 
81.2; Lori Ryan, 79.0; Theresa 
Fronduto, 78.4; Theresa Morris, 
78.2; Mary Mullaney, 77.9; Lori 
Boyne, 77.6; and Kathy Kelly, 
77.6. 

Kelly has high team three of 
921, Morris high team single of 
328, Patty Boyle high individual 
three of 300 and also high 
individual single of 121. 



i 



Newsboys 

(And, Netc$girl$, Too) 

WANTED 



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1601 Hancock St. 

471-3100 



Page 24 Quincy Sun Thursday, January 24, 1974 

Pongratz Brothers Open New 
S. Quincy Appliance House 



The Pongratz brothers are 
old-fashioned when it comes to 
business. They believe in good 
products and good service. 

The services they offer bring 
back fond memories of shopping 
at the neighborhood variety 
store, going to the corner barber 
shop. 

The brothers - Eddy, Chris, 
Bobby and Andy -- offer 
courteous and skilled service in 
their new Pongratz Brothers 
Appliance House at 63 Franklin 
St., South Quincy.- 

They offer immediate delivery 
on brand name appliances, fast 
and affordable credit, and 
trade-ins on your old appliance. 
And any of the four brothers 
can lend you his experience in 
choosing the best appliance for 
your needs. 

In 1968 the brothers owned a 
household appliances store at 
672 Hancock St., Wollaston. A 
fire drove them out of their 
store and they then went into 
commercial laundry equipment 
sales, which eventually led them 
into the dry cleaning business. 

Their Norge Laundries and 
Cleaning Villages caught on in 
Brockton, North Andover, 
Springfield, Framingham, 
Vineland, N.J., and Wheaton and 
Rockville, Md. 

Two weeks ago they opened 
their new appliance store at the 
corner of Franklin and Water 
Sts. There they will help you 
with their knowledge and 




EDDIE AND CHRIS Pongratz sold plenty of dishwashers like this 
one out of their old store in V/ollaston more than five years ago. 
Today they're selling the latest models at their new store on 
Franklin St., South Quincy. 



experience with household 
appliances, and give you that 



***J8* 



important extra - old-fashioned 
good service. 








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Our rates may allow you to Rent a car 
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You get a clean cat with every rental 

Econo Car Rental 

(we're the ones that cost less) 

459 Southern Artery Quincy 
(at Quincy Minit Car Wash) 



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479-4098 



Business News 



Frederick Kurt SGM 
Account Executive 



Frederick A. Kurt has been 
appointed Account Executive 
for S. Gunnar Myrbeck & 
Company, Inc., of Quincy,. 
announces S. Gunnar Myrbeck, 
Chairman of the Board. 

Kurt, well-known advertising 
figure in New England, comes to 
SGM & Co., qualified to further 
broaden the agency's already 
extensive industrial and 
consumer advertising expertise. 
He will be responsible for the 
agency's consumer and industrial 
print, radio, TV marketing 
activities, particularly in the 
fields of investments, package 
goods, publishing, electronics, 
plastics, electric utilities, 
material handling, fire 
suppression, and metalworking. 

In recent years, Kurt has held 
advertising and marketing posts 
with a number of influential 
New England firms. While with 
Cahners Publishing Company 
Boston, he served as Director of 
Marketing of the firm's national 
trade journals, Electric Light & 
Power, Modern Materials 
Handling, Plastics World, and 
Metalworking Magazine, and its 
international publications 
package-program. More recently 
he directed the marketing efforts 
of the National Fire Protection 
Association, publisher of U.S. 
Fire Safety and OSHA Standards 
and U.S. Electric Codes. Earlier, 
Kurt was advertising manager of 
New Departure Division, General 
Motors Corp., Bristol, Conn., 
manufacturer of the 
world-famous "New Departure 
Bicycle Coaster Brake" and 
precision ball bearings, and 
Heli-Coil Corp., Danbury, Conn., 




FREDERICK A. KURT 

producer of automotive 
threaded screw, electroformed 
and fabricated metal products. 

SGM & Co., one of New 
England's 15 largest advertising 
agencies in terms of 1973 
billings, according to an Ad East 
survey, serves more than 40 
prominent firms throughout 
New England with their 
industrial and consumer 
advertising needs. Among the 
agency's clients are: Hancock 
Bank and Trust Company, New 
Hampshire Ball Bearing, Inc., 
Scovill Manufacturing Company, 
Quincy Co-operative Bank, 
Allis-Chalmers Control Division, 
Green Instrument Company, 
United Electric Controls 
Company, Parkway Distributors, 
Boston Woven Hose & Rubber 
Division, Patricia Stevens Career 
School, Carlton House Motor 
Inns and others. 

Kurt is a graduate of Yale 
University and resides in 
Hingham, with his wife Ann, and 
four children. 



Hancock Bank Reports 
Deposits Up 9.7 Percent 



Hancock Bank reports 
year-end deposits up $6, 850,977 
or 9.7 per cent over a year ago, 
according to William E. Kelley, 
president. 

Total deposits rose to 
$77,390,822, while total assets 
increased to $85,894,136 up 
$7,463,124, an increase of 9.5 
per cent, Kelley said. 

Net income reached $966,422 

Scott Takes Part 

Warren C. Scott of Hingham, 
participated in a 1974 tax 
seminar conducted by General 
Business Services, Inc., of 



at year's end, ah increse 
$76,513.35, or 8.6 per cent. 



of 



Kelley said that earnings per 
common share increased 27 
cents or 8.6 per cent per share 
from $3.18 for the year ending 
1972 to $3.45 lor this year. 

Hancock Bank maintains 15 
.banking offices throughout 
Norfolk County. 

In GBS Seminar 

Washington, D.C. 

Scott is the Regional Director 
for GBS in Massachusetts. 



Transit Defective 
Office Furniture 

40 <° 50 

per cent off 

AMERICAN SCOTT 

1626 Hancock St. 
Quincy: 773-3628 



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471-2615 



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Thursday, January 24, 1974 Quincy Sun Page 25 

HOLLYWOOD HOTLINE 

Bette Davis forgives Warner with a kiss 



By NANCY ANDERSON 
Copley News Service 

HOLLYWOOD - The 
taping of the ABC television 
special marking the 50th anni- 
versary of Warner Brothers 
reunited Bette Davis and Jack 
Warner, who kissed when 
they met at the TV studio but 
who were often less cordial 
during their days together on 
the Warners lot. 

In fact, as a Warner star, 
Miss Davis made headlines by 
walking out on Warner and his 
studio. 

This, however, was at least 
a partial mistake. 



During a break in the taping 
the other night Bette told 
about her error in judgment. 

"Just before I flounced off 
to England," she said, "Jack 
called me into his office and 
asked me not to go. He was re- 
ally very nice about it. 

"He told me that he'd op- 
tioned a great, new book to be 
a picture for me. He said I'd 
love it and the role it would 
give me. 

"The name of the book, he 
said, was 'Gone With The 
Wind.'" 

"'Yeah,' I said, 'I'll bet it's 
a pip.' 



"And I walked out. 

"But, Jack," Miss Davis 
concluded, "you did try. You 
tried hard to give me 'Gone 
With The Wind,' and I thank 
you for it." 

George Segal, Bette's co- 
host for the taping, recalled 
that his very first movie was a 
Warner product, "Act One." 

"Later," George said, "my 
contract for 'Virginia Woolf' 
stipulated that the studio turn 
over to me every existing 
print of 'Act One!'" 

"Oh, that wasn't such a bad 
picture," Warner consoled. 
"Though it wasn't such a good 



a pai iim inhume. «» pip. inougnuwasn i sucn a gooa 

I 



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The Master Charge Way 






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These fine Quincy stores offer a 
wide variety of products and con- 
veniences. 







AUTOMOTIVE 



GIFT SHOP 



PHARMACY 



j | Fortuna Citgo 
1 1470 Adams Street 
i;Quincy. 479-9424 

:Duggan Bros. - Chevrolet 
North Quincy Garage 
131 Hancock St. 
; North Quincy, 328-9400 

i: Walter J. Hannon Tire 

495 Hancock St. 
i; No. Quincy. 472-2027 



Aquarius 

131 Billings Rd 

No. Quincy, 471-6274 

The Unique Shop 
131 Washington St., 
Quincy, 479-2062 
Open Wed. thru Sat. 
10 A.M. -5 P.M. 



HARDWARE 



CLOTHING 



Bernie's Modern Formal Shop 
ij 1586 Hancock Street 
! Quincy, 773-7213 

Roberta's Fashions 
1538 Hancock St., 
Quincy, 773-4748 

; Quincy Fashion Exchange 
> 1246 Hancock Street 
! Quincy. 471-3122 



Atlas Paint & Supply 
403 Hancock St. 
No. Quincy 479-1621 

Granite City Hardware Co., 
1617 Hancock Street 
Quincy. 479-5454 



Inc. 



Atlantic Pharmacy 

245 Atlantic St. 

No. Quincy 328-4942 

Keene's Beale Street 
Pharmacy Inc. 
649 Hancock Street 
Wollaston 773-7117 

Naborhood Pharmacy Inc. 
406 Hancock Street 
Quincy, 773-6426 

Samoset Pharmacy Inc. 
215 Samoset Ave., 
No. Quincy 773-1440 



HOME FURNISHINGS 



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Quincy Furniture Co. 
1604 Hancock St., 
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Tags Sleep & 
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1568 Hancock St., 
Quincy. 471-6180 



Kensco Communication Inc. 
46 Pearl Street 
Quincy, 471-6427 



RESTAURANTS 



Duttons Restaurant Inc. 
125 Sea Street 
Quincy, 471-1623 



'Quincy Adams Garden Center 
12 Penn St. 
Quincy. 472-3602 



JEWELRY 



ii 



FLORISTS 



Quint's Flower Shop 
761 Southern Artery 
Quincy. 773-7620 

Roy's Flowers, Inc. 
94 Washington St., 
Quincy. 472-1900 

Major Credit Cards 
Accepted by Phone 

Wollaston Florist 
679 Hancock Street 
Wollaston 472-2855 

[ FOOTWEAR 

Child Teen Shoe Shop & 
Dr. Scholl's Footwear 
28 Cottage Ave. 
Quincy. 479-1717 
Heffernan's Shoes 
14 Cottage Ave. 
Quincy, 471-9330 



George Stone's Jewelry 
1470 Hancock St. 
Quincy, 773-8769 

Roger's Jewelry 
1402 Hancock Street 
Quincy, 773-6340 

Richard J. Gorman 
23A Beale St. 
Wollaston, 773-5031 

Quincy Jewelry 
1564 Hancock Street 
Quincy. 773-7893 



SKIN DIVING 
EQUIPMENT 



South Shore Skin Divers, Inc. 
511 Washington Street * 
Quincy, 773-5452,471-9800 



TRAVEL 



World Wide Travel 
Agency Corp. 
664 Hancock St., 
Wollaston 472-2900 



TV & APPLIANCES 



LIGHTING FIXTURES 
AND LAMPS 



Parkway Lighting Center 
1235 Furnace Brook Pkwy 
Quincy, 472-1800 



Austin Radio & TV Inc. 
53 Franklin Street 
Quincy, 472-4775 

Warren Appliance Supply 
525 Washington St. 
Quincy. 471-0006 



MUSIC 



WALLPAPER & PAINT 



Charles Bean Music Co. 
1598 Hancock Street 
Quincy. 472-7840 



B & D Wallpaper 
1552 Hancock St. 
Quincy. 472-5500 



wwwL ^k w ' mMm»$mtt09mmm$Mmmm9»mmti t m^ 



one either." 

+ + + 
Six of Dee Presley's songs 
are now on demo discs, 
among them "My Lonely 
Heart," "Leaving" and "I 
Want To Run." ... Annik 
Borel, European actress 
signed to play Stalingrade 
Crude in MP's "Truck 
Turner," is daughter of the 
first attache to the cultural 
ambassador of Switzerland. 

. + + + 
It's estimated that the fa- 
ther of the bride, Berry 



Gordy, Jr., spent almost a 
quarter of a million dollars on 
the wedding when his pretty 
daughter Hazel married Jer- 
maine Jackson of the Jackson 
Five. 

But he could probably well 
afford it, since it's also esti- 
mated that his salary as 
chairman of the board of Mo- 
town Records is 10 times that 
of the president of General 
Motors. 

Gordy started Motown only 
13 years ago with a capital of 
$700. 






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to 2 A.M. 

PROPER DRESS 
REQUIRED 



Page 26 Quincy Sun Thursday, January 24, 1974 



LEGAL NOTICES 



COMMONWEALTH OF 
MASSACHUSETTS 

Norfolk, ss. Probate Court 

No. 194,182 

To the Treasurer and Receiver 
General of said Commonwealth, and 
to all persons interested in the estate 
of JOHN J. KELLIHER late of 
Quincy in said County, deceased. 
And to the Attorney General of said 
Commonwealth, if required. 

The public administrator of the 
estate of said deceased has presented 
to said Court for allowance his first 
and final account. 

If you desire to object thereto you 
or your attorney should file a written 
appearance in said Court at Dedhani 
before ten o'clock in the forenoon p<\. 
the twentieth day of February 1974. 
the return dav of this citation. 

Witness. ROBERT M. FORD. 

Esquire, First Judge of said Court, 

this fifteenth day of January 1974. 

PAUL C. GAY, 

Register. 

1/24-312/7/74 



COMMONWEALTH OF 

MASSACHUSETTS 

Norfolk, ss. Probate Court 

No. 188,612 

To all persons interested in the 
estate of AUGUST H. MORTON late 
of Quincy in said County, deceased. 
And to the Attorney General of said 
Commonwealth, if required. 

The executors of the will of said 
deceased have presented to said 
Court for allowance their first and 
final account. 

If you desire to object thereto you 
or your attorney should file a written 
appearance in said Court at Dedham 
before ten o'clock in the forenoon on 
the twentieth day of February 1974, 
the return day of this citation. 

Witness. ROBERT M. FORD, 
Esquire, First Judge of said Court, 
this seventeenth day of January 
1974. 

PAUL C. GAY, 
Register. 
1/24-31 2/7/74 



COMMONWEALTH 01 
MASSACHUSETTS 

Norfolk, ss. Superior Court 

No. 1 1 1 544 

[SEAL] To B E S T 
DEVELOPMENT CORP.. GEORGF 
H. CORBI.TT. and GERMAINE I . 
CORBI-TT and to all persons entitled 
to the benefit of the Soldiers and 
Sailors Civil Relief Act of 1940 as 
amended ROSE INHALE 
CO-OPERATIVE BANK 01 
BOSTON. MASS. GREETING: 

Claiming to be the holder of a 
mortgage covering real property 
situated in Quincy. County of 
Norfolk, given by Best Development 
Corp. to Roslindale Co-operative 
Bank of Boston, Mass., dated 
October 25, 1972 and recorded with 
Norfolk Registry of Deeds in Book 
4880 Page 623 has filed with said 
court a bill in equity for authority to 
foreclose said mortgage in the 
manner following: by entry to 
foreclose and by exercise of power of 
sale set forth in said mortgage. 

If you are entitled to the benefits 
of the Soldiers' and Sailors' Civil 
Relief Act of 1940 as amended, and 
you object to such foreclosure, you 
or your attorney should file a written 
appearance and answer in said court 
at Dedham on or before February 25, 
1974 or you may be forever barred 
from claiming that such foreclosure is 
invalid under said act. 

Witness, WALTER H. 
McLAUGHLIN, Esquire, Chief 
Justice of our Superior Court, the 
14th day of January in the year of 
our Lord one thousand nine hundred 
and seventy-four. 

JOHN P. CONCANNON 
Clerk. 
1/24/74 



LOST PASSBOOK 

The following passbook No. 155 has 
been lost, destroyed or stolen and 
application for payment has been 
made in accordance with Section 20, 
Chapter 167, General Laws. The 
finder will please return to the 
Shipbuilders Coop. Bank, 1 Granite 
St., Quincy, MA. 
1/17-24/74 



LEGAL NOTICES 



COMMONWEALTH OF 
MASSACHUSETTS 

Norfolk, ss. Probate Court 

No. 74P0034 

To all persons interested in the 
estate of NORMAN GOODWIN late 
of Quincy in said County, deceased. 
And to the Attorney General of said 
Commonwealth, if required. 

A petition has been presented to 
said Court for probate of a certain 
instrument purporting to be the last 
will of said deceased by NORMAN 
GOODWIN JR. of Quincy in the 
County of Norfolk praying that he be 
appointed executor thereof without 
giving a surety on his bond. 

If you desire to object thereto you 
or your attorney should file a written 
appearance in said Court at Dedham 
before ten o'clock in the forenoon on 
the thirteenth day of February 1974, 
the return day of this citation. • 

Witness, ROBERT M. FORD, 
I squire, First Judge of said Court, 
this ninth day of January 1974. 

PAUL C. GAY, 
Register. 
1/17-24-31/74 



COMMONWEALTH OF 
MASSACHUSETTS 

Norfolk, ss. Probate Court 

No. 199,435 

To all persons interested in the 
estate of KALAL LAHAGE late of 
Quincy in said County, deceased. 
And to the Attorney "General of said 
Commonwealth, if required. 

A petition has been presented to 
said Court for probate of a certain 
instrument purporting to be the last 
will dated March 3, 1970 of said 
deceased by BEDROS BAHARIAN 
of Quincy in the County of Norfolk 
praying that he be appointed 
executor thereof without giving a 
surety on his bond. 

If you desire to object thereto you 
or your attorney should file a written 
appearance in said Court at Dedham 
before ten o'clock in the forenoon on 
the twenty-seventh day of March 
1974. the return day of this citation. 

Witness, ROBERT M. FORD. 
Esquire, First Judge of said Court, 
this ninth day of January 1974. 

PAUL C. GAY, 
Register. 
1/17-24-3 1 74. 

COMMONWEALTH OF 
MASSACHUSETTS 

Norfolk, ss. Probate Court 

No. 74P0012 

To the Treasurer and Receiver 
General o\' said Commonwealth, and 
to all persons interested in the estate 
of FLORENCE GWYNN late of 
Quincy in said County, deceased. 

A petition has been presented to 
said Court, praying that JAMES R. 
LAWL.IR of Ncedham in said 
County of Norfolk, public 
administrator, be appointed 
administrator of said estate. 

If you desire to object thereto you 
or your attorney should file a written 
appearance in said Court at Dedham 
before ten o'clock in the forenoon on 
the thirteenth day of February 1974, 
the return day of this citation. 

Witness, ROBERT M. FORD, 
Esquire, First Judge of said Court, 
this tenth day of Januarv 1974. 

PAUL C. GAY 
Register. 
1/17-24-31/74 



COMMONWEALTH OF 

MASSACHUSETTS 

Norfolk, ss. Probate Court 

No. 74P0037 

To all persons interested in the 
estate of VERA F. G. NASON late of 
Quincy in said County, deceased. 

A petition has been presented to 
said Court praying that HELEN N. 
WHITTIER of Duxbury in the 
County of Plymouth be appointed 
administratrix of said estate without 
giving a surety on her bond. 

If you desire to object thereto you 
or your attorney should file a written 
appearance in said Court at Dedham 
before ten o'clock in the forenoon on 
the thirteenth day of February 1974, 
the return day of this citation. 

Witness, ROBERT M. FORD, 
Esquire, First Judge of said Court, 
this tenth day of January 1974. 

PAUL C. GAY, 
Register. 
1/17-24-31/74 



LEGAL NOTICES 



COMMONWEALTH OF 

MASSACHUSETTS 

Norfolk, ss. Probate Court 

No. 199,532 

To all persons interested in the 
estate of MARIE C. DiANTONIO 
late of Quincy in said County, 
deceased. 

A petition has been presented to 
said Court praying that ANN 
HiANTONIO of Quincy in the 
County of Norfolk be appointed 
administratrix of said estate without 
giving a surety on her bond. 

If you desire to object thereto you 
or your attorney should file a written 
appearance in said Court at Dedham 
before ten o'clock in the forenoon on 
the sixth day of February 1974, the 
return day of this citation. 

Witness, ROBERT M. FORD, 
Esquire, First Judge of said Court, 
this second day of January 1974. 

PAUL C. GAY, 
Register. 
1/10-17-24/74 



COMMONWEALTH OF 

MASSACHUSETTS 

Norfolk, ss. Probate Court 

No. 193,600 

To the Treasurer and Receiver 
General of said Commonwealth, and 
to all persons interested in the estate 
of ROGER B. CARON late of 
Quincy in said County, deceased. 

The Public Administrator of said 
estate has presented to said Court his 
first account for allowance and a 
petition for distribution of the 
balance in his hands. 

If you desire to object thereto you 
or your attorney should file a written 
appearance in said Court at Dedham, 
before ten o'clock in the forenoon on 
the thirteenth day of February 1974, 
the return day of this citation. 

Witness, ROBERT M. FORD, 
Esquire, First Judge of said Court, 
this seventh day of January 1974. 

PAUL C. GAY, 
Register. 
1/17-24-31/74 



COMMONWEALTH 01 
MASSACHUSETTS 

Norfolk, ss. Probate Court 

No. 74P0033 

To all persons interested in the 
estate of CHESTER A. DENNISON 
late of Quincy in said County, 
deceased. And to the Attorney 
General of said Commonwealth, if 
required. 

A petition has been presented to 
said Court for probate of a certain 
instrument purporting to be the last 
will of said deceased by HORIS D. 
RIDD1CK of Quincy in the County 
of Norfolk praying that she be 
appointed executrix thereof without 
giving a surety on her bond. 
• If you desire to object thereto you 
or your attorney should file a written 
appearance in said Court at Dedham 
before ten o'clock in the forenoon on 
the thirteenth day of February 1974, 
the return day of this citation. 

Witness, ROBERT M. FORD, 
Esquire, First Judge of said Court, 
this ninth day of January 1974. 

PAUL C. GAY, 
Register. 
1/17-24-31/74 



COMMONWEALTH OF 

MASSACHUSETTS 

Norfolk, ss. Probate Court 

No.192,644 

To all persons interested in the 
estate of ELIZABETH H. 
O'CONNELL late of Quincy in said 
County, deceased. And to the 
Attorney General of said 
Commonwealth, if required. 

The executor of the will of said 
deceased has presented to said Court 
for allowance his first and final 
account. 

If youdesire to object thereto you 
or your attorney should file a written 
appearance in said Court at Dedham 
before ten o'clock in the forenoon on 
the thirteenth day of February 1974, 
the return day of this citation. 

Witness, ROBERT M. FORD, 
Esquire, First Judge of said Court, 
this eleventh day of January 1974. 

PAUL C. GAY, 
Register. 
1/17-24-31/74 



LEGAL NOTICES 



COMMONWEALTH OF 

MASSACHUSETTS 

Norfolk, ss. Probate Court 

No. 199,567 

To S. ALICE BARRON also 
known as ALICE BARRON of 
Quincy in the County of Norfolk, 
and to her heirs apparent or 
presumptive and to the Massachusetts 
Department of Mental Health. And 
to the Attorney General of said 
Commonwealth, if required. 

A petition has been presented to 
said Court alleging that the aforesaid 
S. ALICE BARRON has become 
incapacitated by reason of advanced 
age - mental weakness - to properly 
care for her property and praying 
that ELIZABETH G. PITNOF of 
Quincy in said County, or some other 
suitable person, be appointed 
conservator of her property. 

If you desire to object thereto, 
you or your attorney should file a 
written appearance in said Court at 
Dedham before ten o'clock in the 
forenoon on the sixth day of 
February 1974, the return day of this 
citation. 

Witness, ROBERT M. FORD, 
Esquire, First Judge of said Court, 
this second day of January, 1974. 

PAUL C. GAY, 
Register. 
1/10-17-24/74 



COMMONWEALTH OF 

MASSACHUSETTS 

Norfolk, ss. Probate Court 

No. 199,025 

To all persons interested in the 
estate of SABATINO 
GIANNANGELI late of Quincy in 
said County, deceased. And to the 
Attorney General of said 
Commonwealth, if required. 

A petition has been presented to 
said Court for probate of a certain 
instrument purporting to be the last 
will of said deceased by JOSEPH S. 
CIPOLLA of Quincy in the County 
of Norfolk and BENEDETTO 
PAONE of Quincy in the County of 
Norfolk praying that they be 
appointed executors thereof without 
giving a surety on their bond. 

If you desire to object thereto you 
or your attorney should file a written 
appearance in said Court at Dedham 
before ten o'clock in the forenoon on 
the sixth day of February 1974. the 
return dav of this citation. 

Witness. ROBERT M. LORD. 
Esquire, first Judge of said Court, 
this twenty-sixth dav of December 
1973. 

PAUL C. GAY, 
Register. 
1/10-17-24/74 

COMMONWEAL I'll 01 
MASSACHUSETTS 

Norfolk, ss. Probate Court 

No. 199.541 

To all persons interested in the 
estate of LOUIS G. HiBONA late of 
Quincy in said County, deceased. 
And to the Attorney General of said 
Commonwealth, if required. 

A petition has been presented to 
said Court for probate of a certain 
instrument purporting to be the last 
will of said deceased by RUTH A. 
DiBONA of Quincy in the County of 
Norfolk praying that she be 
appointed executrix thereof without 
giving a surety on her bond. 

If you desire to object thereto you 
or your attorney should file a written 
appearance in said Court at Dedham 
before ten o'clock in the forenoon on 
the sixth day of February 1974, the 
return day of this citation. 

Witness, ROBERT M. FORD, 
Esquire, First Judge of said Court, 
this second day of January, 1974. 

PAUL C. GAY, 
Register. 
1/10-17-24/74 

LOST PASSBOOK 

The following passbook No. 7034-4 
has been lost, destroyed or stolen and 
application for payment has been 
made in accordance with Section 20, 
Chapter 167, General Laws. The 
finder will please return to the 
Granite Co-operative Bank, 440 
Hancock Street, Quincy, Mass. 
02171. 
1/17-24/74 






Save Gas and Money ... 
shop locally. 



LEGAL NOTICES 



COMMONWEALTH OF 

MASSACHUSETTS 

Norfolk, ss. Probate Court 

No. 194,387 

To the Treasurer and Receiver 
General of said Commonwealth, and 
to all persons interested in the estate 
of EDWARD BERARD late of 
Quincy in said County, deceased. 
And to the Attorney General of said 
Commonwealth, if required. 

The public administrator of the 
estate of said deceased has presented 
to said Court for allowance his first 
and final account. 

If you desire to object thereto you 
or your attorney should file a written 
appearance in said Court at Dedham 
before ten o'clock in the forenoon on 
the twentieth day of February 1974, 
the return day of this citation. 

Witness ROBERT M. FORD, 

Esquire, First Judge of said Court, 

this fifteenth day of January 1974. 

PAUL C. GAY, 

Register. 

1/24-312/7/74 

COMMONWEALTH OF 

MASSACHUSETTS 

Norfolk, ss. Probate Court 

No.D-33654 

To PATRICIA A YEUNG of Parts 
Unknown. 

A libel has been presented to said 
Court by your husband, DAVID Y. 
YEUNG of Quincy in the County of 
Norfolk praying that a divorce from 
the bond of matrimony between 
himself and you be decreed for the 
cause of cruel and abusive treatment. 

If you desire to object thereto, 
you or your attorney should file a 
written appearance in said Court at 
Dedham within twenty-one days 
from the twentieth day of March 
1974, the return day of this citation. 

Witness, ROBERT M. FORD, 
Esquire, First Judge of said Court, 
this twenty-first day of December 

1973. 

PAUL C. GAY, 
Register. 
1/10-17-24/74 



COMMONWEALTH OF 
MASSACHUSETTS 

Norfolk, ss. Probate Court 

No. 199.450 

To all persons interested in the 
estate of ETHEL M. SMITH late of 
Quincy in said County, deceased. 
And to the Attorney General of said 
Commonwealth, if required. 

A petition has been presen.ed to 
said Court for probate of a certain 
instrument purporting to be the last 
will of said deceased by MARION 
AUFIERO of Quincy in the County 
of Norfolk praying that she be 
appointed executrix thereof withou. 
giving a surety on her bond. 

If you desire to object thereto you 
or your attorney should file a written 
appearance in said Court at Dedham 
before ten o'clock in the forenoon on 
the sixth day of February 1974, the 
return day of this citation. 

Witness, ROBERT M. FORD,. 
Esquire, First Judge of said Court, 
this second day of January 1974. 

PAUL C. GAY, 
Register. 
1/10-17-24/74 

COMMONWEALTH OF 

MASSACHUSETTS 

Norfolk, ss. Probate Court 

No. 74P0097 

To all persons interested in the 
estate of JAMES J. FLAVIN late of 
Quincy in said County, deceased. 
And to the Attorney General of said 
Commonwealth, if required. 

A petition has been presented to 
said Court for probate of a certain 
instrument purporting to be the last 
will of said deceased by HELEN F. 
FLAVIN of Quincy in the County of 
Norfolk praying that she be 
appointed executrix thereof without 
giving a surety on her bond. 

If you desire to object thereto you 
or your attorney should file a written 
appearance in said Court at Dedham 
before ten o'clock in the lorenoon on 
the twentieth day of February 1974, 
the return day of this citation. 

Witness, ROBERT M. FORD, 

Esquire, First Judge of said Court, 

this sixteenth day of January 1974. 

PAUL C. GAY, 

Register. 

1/24-312/7/74 



Thursday, January 24, 1974 Quincy Sun Page 27 



•' . « M ' : ■ "■ T* *-"•'<•?- T-. 




LEGAL NOTICES 



COMMONWEALTH OF 
MASSACHUSETTS 

Norfolk, ss. Superior Court: 

No. 111529 

To RICHARD P. CARL, BARBARA 

A. CARL, GEORGE G. BURKE, 

Executor U/W/O MARY A. 
HANRAHAN, STEPHEN B. 
NEEDEL and FRANCIS L. 
MORRELL and to all persons 
entitled to the benefit of the Soldiers 
and Sailors Civil Relief Act of 1940 
as amended The Quincy Co-operative 
Bank GREETING: Claiming to be 
the holder of a mortgage covering 
real property situated in Quincy, 
County of Norfolk given by Richard 
P. Carl and Barbara A. Carl to The 
Quincy Co-operative Bank dated 
April 30, 1970 and recorded in 
Norfolk County Registry of Deeds 
book 4660 Page 706, has filed with 
said court a bill in equity for 
authority to foreclose said mortgage 
in the manner following: by entry to 
foreclose and by exercise of power of 
sale set forth in said mortgage. 

If you are entitled to the benefits 
of the Soldiers' and Sailors' Civil 
Relief Act of 1940 as amended, and 
you object to such foreclosure, you 
or your attorney should file a written 
appearance and answer in said court 
at Dedham on or before February 22, 
1974 or you may be forever barred 
from claiming that such foreclosure is 
invalid under said act. 

Witness, WALTER H 
MCLAUGHLIN, Esquire, Chief 
Justice of our Superior Court, the 
11th day of January in the year of 
our Lord one thousand nine hundred 
and seventy-four. 

JOHN P. CONCANNON 

Clerk. 

1/24/74 



COMMONWEALTH OF 
MASSACHUSETTS 

Norfolk, ss. Probate Court 

No. D-33646 

To LAWRENCE F. DWYER of 
Parts Unknown. 

A libel has been presented to said 
Court by your wife MARY ANN 
DWYER of Quincy in the County of 
Norfolk praying that a divorce from 
the bond of matrimony between 
herself and you be decreed for the 
cause of cruel and abusive treatment 
and praying for alimony and for 
custody of and allowance for minor 
children. 

If you desire to object thereto, 
you or your attorney should file a 
written appearance in said Court at 
Dedham within twenty-one days 
from the seventeenth day of April 
1974, the return day of this citation. 

Witness, ROBERT M. LORD. 

Esquire, First Judge of said Court, 

this fourteenth day of January 1974. 

PAUL C. GAY, 

Register. 

1/24-31 2/7/74 

COMMONWEALTH OF 

MASSACHUSETTS 

Norfolk, ss. Probate Court 

No. 74P0100 

To all persons interested in the 
estate of ANGELO DiGIUSTO late 
of Quincy in said County, deceased. 
And to the Attorney General of said 
Commonwealth, if required. 

A petition has been presented to 
said Court for probate of a certain 
instrument purporting to be the last 
W 'H of said deceased by 
FRANCESCO DiGIUSTO of Quincy 
in the County of Norfolk praying 
mat he be appointed executor 
thereof without giving a surety on his 
bond. 

,U you desire to object thereto you 
or your attorney should file a written 
appearance in said Court at Dedham 
before ten o'clock in the forenoon on 
the twentieth day of February 1974, 
the return day of this citation. 

Witness, ROBERT M. LORD, 

Esquire, First Judge of said Court, 

this sixteenth day of January J 974. 

PAUL C. GAY, 

Register. 

•/24-312/7/74 



LEGAL NOTICES 



COMMONWEALTH OF 
MASSACHUSETTS 

Norfolk, ss. Probate Court 

No. 74P0078 

To all persons interested in the 
estate of S. LETITIA TOBIN also 
known as SARA LETITIA TOBIN 
late of Quincy in said County, 
Deceased. And to the Attorney 
General of said Commonwealth, if 
required. 

A petition has been presented to 
said Court for probate of a certain 
instrument purporting to be the last 
will of said deceased by JOHN F. 
TOBIN of Westwood in the County 
of Norfolk praying that he be 
appointed executor thereof without 
giving a surety on his bond, Louise S. 
Meredith also named having declined 
to serve. 

If you desire to object thereto you 
or your attorney should file a written 
appearance in said Court at Dedham 
before ten o'clock in the forenoon on 
the twentieth day of February 1974, 
the return day of this citation. 

Witness, ROBERT M. FORD, 

Esquire, First Judge of said Court, 

this sixteenth day of January 1974. 

PAUL C. GAY, 

Register. 

1/24-31 2/7/74 

MISCELLANEOUS 



HELP WANTED 



LOSE WEIGHT 

Lose weight with New Shape 
Tablets and Hydro/ Water Pills. 
At vow Drug Store. 

2/7 



SEK VICES 



GENERAL CARPENTRY 

Remodelling, Repairs, Additions. 
Bathrooms, Kitchens, Playrooms, 
etc. Call evenings. 

John D. Mignosa 
479-4865 2/7 



HELP WANTED 

You can buy Sarah Coventry 
Jewelry or you can get it free. 
Phone 843-1675 evenings 5 to 7 
and learn how you can become a 
FASHION SHOW DIRECTOR. 
Interesting and profitable. 

1/31 



EARN MONEY AT HOME 

Work full or part time. Earn 
$250. for every 500 circulars 
you mail. For details, send $ 1 
and a self-addressed stamped 
envelope to 

P.O.Box 1054, 
Brockton, Mass. 02401 

2/7 

FOR SALE 
MATTRESSES 

MATTRESSES - -Immediate 
Delivery. Can you use 
exceptionally good buys on 
king, queen, full or twin 
mattresses, beds, trundles, 
bunks at discount. Brand 
names, Sealy, Eclipse, 
Slumberland, Englander, etc. 
Bedding has been our only 
business for over 20 years. 
Open eves., Siesta Sleep 
Shops, 221 Parkingway, 
Quincy, Corner of School 
Street. 

T.F. 

AUTOS 



SERVICES OFFERED 



SERVICES OFFERED 



FLOORS & WALLS 

Linoleum, ceramic tile, formica, sold & installed. Hardwood 
floors laid, sanded and finished. Many specials in our store. 
Wall Tile, carpeting, Armstrong floor coverings of all types 
at reduced prices. 

ART FLOOR COMPANY 

1 15 Sagamore St., North Quincy 

328-6970 

Open 8:00 -500 Daily 
Closed Sat. 



GLANCY, GREENE 
& ASSOCIATES 

Dormers Roofing Gutters 
Builders & Remodelers 

•Custom Kitchens & Bathrooms 

• Basements & Attics 

• Family Rooms 

Complete Home Insulation 

Plymouth Quincy Maiden 

585-6430 472-3008 321-8068 



• Garages & Additions 

• Porches & Stairs 



1/24 



CHILD CARE 

Rent-A-Parent, Young married 
South Shore couples will care 
for your home and children 
while you enjoy your 
vacation. Interviews and 
References available. 

UNIVERSITY 

HOME SERVICES 

961-1616 RANDOLPH 
449-3590 NEEDHAM 

T.F. 

CARPENTRY 



PHOTOGRAPHY 

GETTING MARRIED? Bill 

Johnston will photograph your 
wedding for $95. Complete 
coverage. Announcement photos 
free. Call days ^..yfj^ 

Eves 328-1423. 



1/24 



FUEL OIL 



1970 BLAZER 

4-wheel drive with super lift 
power angle plow. Top yellow 
light and plow lights. Low 
mileage. V-8, 4 new tires. $3,195. 

471-1856. 



Licensed builder, 26 years 
experience. Repairs, remodeling & 
additions. No job too small, hree 
estimates. Charles J. Ross 
479-3755. ' ' 




THIS SPACE CONTRHUTED »V THE PUBLISHER 



1ST 

APPLIANCE REPAIRS 

Washers, dryers, dishwashers, 

electric ranges. Whirlpool, 

Kenmore, G.E., Westinghouse, 

Maytag, Kitchenaid. 24-hour 
service. 

PAUL BENNETT, 

288-0663. */ 24 

KEYS MADE 



Locksmith on Duty 

GRANITE CITY 

HARDWARE 

1617 Hancock St., Quincy 

479-5454 



DOYLE & LONG 

FUEL OIL 

& 

HEATING EQUIPMENT 

624 Hancock St., Wollaston 

Tel: 472-4800 T.F. 



HALL FOR RENT 



North Quincy K. of C. Building, 5 
Hollis Ave. For information 
please call, 

328-5552-328-0087- 
328-9822 

T.F. 



WEAVER 
FOREIGN AUTO 

Service Certified Jaguar-Rolls 
technician. 26 yrs experience 
servicing all foreign cars. 
Quality work guaranteed 

843-8663 T - F - 



INSURANCE 



T.F. 



HOME OWNERS RATliS ARE 
LOWER: If you have a # basic- 
Homeowner's policy for $20,000 
and are paying more than $62.00 
a year, call 282-4412 at once. 
Rutstein Insurance Agency. 



Index for 
Classified 

A Services 

B For Sale 

C Autos 

D Boats 

E For Rent 

F Help Wanted 

G Pets, Livestock 

H Lost and Found 

I Real Estate for Sale 

J Real Estate Wanted 

K Miscellaneous 

L Work Wanted 

M Antiques 

N Coins and Stamps 

O Rest Homes 

P Instruction 



HN 



MAIL TO: QUINCY SUN 1601 Hancock St., Quincy 02169 
WANT ADS PAYABLE IN ADVANCE...ca 8 h must accompany order 
Enclosed is , for the following ad to run__times 



COPY: 



Rates: 
Contract rite: 



$2.25 for one week, up to 20 words, -V each additional word. 

$2.00 per week, up to 20 words for three or more insertions of 

the same ad. 

No refund will be made at this contract rate in the event of 

cancellation. 

Deadline: Friday 5 P.M. for the following weeks publication. 
Please include your phone number in ad. 



Page 28 Quincy Sun Thursday, January 24, 1974 




SALE! 

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TWIN SIZE 
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11.88 13 88 



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18 88 



3.25 " 



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Polyester nylon blend electric 
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polyester filled 
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our own "Lady Almy® " 

acrylic yarn 



21x27 



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2.75 



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SKEIN 109 



Small floral ticking Polyester filling is soft, 
bouyant and allergy free. Corded edges. 



4-02 , 4-ply Orion 5 acrylic yarn in 
choice of over 60 colors. 



ALMY'S • HANOVER MALL 



OPEN 10 TO 9:30 



Thomas Crane Public Library 

Box 379 

Quincy, Mass. 021b9 



Claims Boston Hogs 



Quincy Gets Problems 



Lydon Criticizes U-Mass For Snub 
On Student Impact Problem Here 




Vol. 6 No. 20 

Thursday, January 31, 1974 



2ui«c*( J Ottm TUte&Uf IftMjiajtyi 



Wants Another Dog 

5-Year Old Tammy Stuart 
Bravely Faces 4th Operation 



ByPAULFELDMAN 

A pretty five-year-old Snug 
Harbor girl, Tammy Stuart, 
faces several rounds of skin 
graft surgery and a two year 
wait for plastic surgery as a 
result of a disfiguring dog 
attack almost two weeks ago. 

Tammy has already 
undergone three operations 
and is being prepared for a 
fourth round of surgery to 
repair her upper lip. 

"She's acting bravely," 
says her father, William 
Stuart of 31 Binnacle Lane. 
"She has more guts than the 
rest of us combined." 

Tammy even wants 
another dog. But her father 
doesn't know. He's afraid 
there will be more dog 




TAMMY STUART 

attacks in Germantown. 

Doctors have told her 
parents Tammy will be at 



Quincy City Hospital for at 
least a month and must wait 
two years before plastic 
surgery can be performed. 

The fourth operation will 
graft skin to replace her 
upper left lip, torn away in 
the dog attack Jan. 19. 

While parts of the lip were 
sewn back properly, her 
upper left lip must be 
replaced with skin from her 
lower lip. 

Meanwhile, her father 
warns, "Let's face it, it's 
going to happen again." 

According to Stuart, packs 
of eight to 10 dogs are still 
roaming the area. 

"It was bad this time - 
next time it could be a 
complete disaster," the father 
[Cont'd on Page 2J 



Father Out Of Work 

16-Year Old 'Micky' Rucker 
Under Surgery To Save Sight 



Most people take their 
eyesight for granted. 

They open their eyes - 
they see - and that's that. 

But when you read a story 
like this, you realize that 
sometimes you should stop 
and think about how 
fortunate you are for having 
the everyday things like 
eyesight. 

On Tuesday, Michele 
[Micky J Rucker, 16, 
daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Olin 
Rucker of 369 Granite St., 
was operated on for a 
detached retina of her right 
eye. Unless the treatment is 
successful, she may lose all 
vision in her right eye. 

Three years ago, Michele, 
without warning, lost the 
vision in her left eye. 







MICHELE RUCKER 

"We don't know how it 
happened" says her mother, 
Doris, sadly, "It seems like it 



happened all at once." 

Her mother says Micky is 
"kind of depressed. She 
doesn't talk unless you talk 
to her." 

Micky had gone to the 
hospital last Thursday for her 
twice-yearly checkup on her 
right eye, when the doctor 
told her to stay for the 
operation. 

"We were talking of getting 
her contact lenses when this 
happened," says Mrs, Rucker. 

Mrs. Rucker, the mother of 
seven children, describes 
Micky as an extra-thoughtful 
person. ''She was so good to 
me, so thoughtful. 
Frequently she'd bring home 
little gifts for me. And each 
Sunday she'd take the two 



Residents, Official Team 



Dog Innoculation Drive 
Underway In Germantown 



An agreement to help 
eliminate stray dogs and to 
innoculate unlicensed dogs in 
Germantown was worked out 
Tuesday between city officials 
and members of the 
Germantown community. 

According to City Health 
Commissioner Dr. Alfred V. 
Mahoney, Germantown residents 
present at the meeting agreed to 
survey the area's dog owners to 
find the number of dogs not 
innoculated for rabies. 

If Dr. Mahoney believes the 



statistics are high enough, he will 
set up an innoculation clinic in 
Germantown to augment the 
annual city clinic at the John F. 
Kennedy Health Center in May. 

At the same time, City Dog 
Officer Frank Berlucchi made an 
agreement with Mrs. Theresa 
Martin, a Germantown resident 
attending the meeting, to work 
together to control stray dogs in. 
Germantown. 

Since Jan. 12, Berlucchi has 
been to Germantown 
"practically every day" and has 



picked up 33 stray dogs, only 13 
of which have been voluntarily 
reclaimed by their owners. 

Berlucchi says the "problem is 
now under control" and that 
"dog lovers in Germantown are 
cooperating." 

Mrs. Martin successfully 
fought an eviction notice last 
.July resulting from her refusal to 
give up her dog. Until July, dogs 
were banned from the 
Germantown projects by Quincy 
Housing Authority edict. 
[Cont'd on Page 2] 



By TOM HENSHAW 

City Councillor John J. Lydon Jr. has been appointed 
Quincy's liaison officer to the new University of 
Massachusetts Boston branch in Columbia Point, 
Dorchester. 

Mayor Waltei J. Hannon, who made the appointment 
Monday, the day U. Mass-Boston opened to students, 
described Lydon as the man who "had done the most' to 
derive some benefit for the residents of Quincy from the 
new university." 

But Lydon was the first to admit that few if any 
benefits have been derived. Said Lydon: 

"The City of Quincy has 
taken the first steps toward 
developing cordial relations with 
its new University neighbor but 
after a year's effort on the part 
of the city, the university has 
yet to respond in any fashion." 

Lydon began negotiating with 
the university early in 1973, 
when it was first felt that due to 
the proximity of the school and 
its transportation links, its 
presence might have an impact 
on Quincy similar to that on 
Boston. 

"Kevin White, mayor of the 
city of Boston," said Lydon, 
"has forced the university to 
provide special privileges and 
benefits for the city of Boston, 
which detrimentally affect the 
surrounding cities and towns. 

"The university has aided the 
city of Boston in its endeavors 
to lessen student impact. They 
presently maintain an apartment 
rental listing service for the 
university students. 

"They refuse to provide 
students with access to property 
listings for the South Boston, 
Dorchester and Mattapan areas 
but they are quite willing to 



provide the students with 
Quincy listings." 

Lydon said that about two 
weeks ago he placed a four-point 
plan before university officials 
and asked their cooperation. The 
points were these: 

• That the university actively 
seek recruitment of students 
from Quincy, even to the point 
of providing a "13th year" 
program for those who might be 
academically deficient. 

•. That the university spread 
its spending throughout the 
metropolitan area, including a 
program to train small 
businessmen in methods of 
bidding on university contracts. 

• That various departments of 
the university consider doing 
field work, not only in the city 
of Boston but also in Quincy. 

• That the university work 
closely with the city of Quincy 
on projects of grant 
development. 

The proposals, said Lydon, 
are not unlike those the 
university is already providing for 
the city ol Boston. But, he said, 
he has had ho favorable reply. 



Marshall Asks 'Hoarding' 
Check On Closed Stations 



City Councillor Clifford H. 
Marshall has asked the Fire 
Department to check abandoned 
or closed gasoline stations in 
Quincy as possible hoarding 
places or safety violations. 

Marshall noted that the state 
fire marshall's office has found 
at least a dozen such stations in 
the state that have been in 
violation. 

"We don't want these 
violations occuring in Quincy," 
he said. "If any abandoned 
stations in Quincy are being used 
for hoarding while residents are 
paying high prices for gasoline 
and oil, we should crack down 
on it immediately. 



"Even if there is no hoarding, 
there is a possibility remnants of 
gasoline in storage tanks could 
present a serious public safety 
hazard." 

He made his request for a 
check of the stations in a letter 
to Fire Chief Edward Barry. In it 
he said : 

"Although I have every 
confidence that the Fire 
Department is conducting 
thorough and periodic 
investigations of any and all 
closed or abandoned gasoline 
stations within the confines of 
the City of Quincy, I would like 
your office to forward to the 
[Cont'd on Page 3] 




QUINCY HONORED - Accepting a silver cup and a Paul Revere 
Bowl in recognition of Quincy reaching 101 per cent of its United 
Fund goal for the first time in eight years is Mayor Walter J 
Hannon, [right] and Atty. Terry Flukes, Quincy community 
chairman. The awards were made at a dinner meeting at the 
Sheraton Boston. 



Page 2 Quincy Sun Thursday, January 31, 1974 

Dog Innoculation Drive 
In Germantown 



(Cont'd from Page 1] 

The innoculation problem has 
occured, in large part, because 
until the ruling in July, most 
Germantown residents were 
afraid to license their dogs 
fearing eviction. 

No licenses are issued by the 
City Clerk unless a rabies 
innoculation has been given to 
the pet. 

Apparently, many 
Germantown dog owners who 
did not get city licenses did not 
bother to innoculate their dogs 
either. 

Of the 33 dogs picked up by 
Berlucchi since Jan. 12, only 18 
had innoculation tags. 

Dr. Mahoney says the 
problem is not restricted to the 
Germantown area. "There's a 
bad situation throughout the 



city, many dogs not being 
innoculated." 

Mahoney warned of the 
danger to humans of rabies 
infestation from the bite of an 
uninnoculated dog and said, "It 
is the responsibility of the 
individual owner" to take his 
dog to the annual city clinic or 
to a private veterinarian for 
innoculation. 

City Dog Officer Berlucchi 
has estimated there are about 
250 dogs in the Germantown 
projects area. 

Among those that attended 
the morning meeting at the 
Mayor's office were Mayor 
Walter Hannon, Dog Officer 
Berlucchi, Police Chief Francis 
X. Finn, QHA Director Clement 
O'Brien, Health Commissioner 
Dr. Mahoney and Germantown 
residents. 



BARKER'S 

We're Taking A Bow 




JiJ 472-2122 

ONE MAPLE STREET 
QUINCY SQUARE 




HOSPITAL GIFT-Commander Lawrence A. Carnali of Morrisette Legion Post presents $2,000 check to 
Quincy City Hospital Director Harlan L. Paine as a Christmas gift. The donation, from the Morrisette 
Post, will be used to purchase equipment for the Emergency Department of the hospital. 

Tammy Stuart Faces 4th Operation 

edict. 

Then Mrs. Theresa Martin, 
fighting an eviction notice for 
refusing to give up her dog, 
appealed to the State 
Department of Community 
Affairs which overruled the 
unilateral prohibition of pets. 

City Dog Officer Frank 
Berlucchi, estimates there are 
250 dogs in the projects. And 
in 1973, 41 dogs were 
impounded in the project and 
only 15 were reclaimed and 
licensed. 



[Cont'd from Page 1] 
of the Snug Harbor 
kindergarten student said. 

However, City Dog Officer 
Frank Berlucchi says "The 
problem is now under 
control." 

Berlucchi reports he has 
picked up 33 stray dogs since 
Jan. 12 in Germantown and 
says "People in Germantown 
are cooperating to solve this 
problem." 

In the same two-week 
period, he has said he has 
picked up about 20 dogs in 
the rest of Quincy. 

Doctors have waited for 
Tammy's blood pressure to 
stabilize before operating a 
fourth time, her father said. 

Skin grafting is a 
drawn-out process and 
Tammy will have to undergo 
grafting surgery a few times 
in the next month, her 
parents said. 

A "Tammy Stuart Fund" 
has been started and 
donations can be sent directly 
to the Quincy Savings Bank. 

Stuart is a shipper-receiver 
at Kincaide's Furniture on 



Hancock St. He and Mrs. 
Stuart, have four children. 

Tammy is the oldest. She 
has a sister, Darliene, 3, and 
two brothers, Randy, 2, and 
William, 1 1 months. 

Two dogs, one owned by 
the Stuarts, the other by a 
neighbor, have been disposed 
of as a result of the attack. 
Police have not determined 
which dog attacked Tammy 
but Mrs. Stuart quoted her 
daughter as saying the 
neighbor's dog attacked and 
the Stuart dog went to her 
aid. 

Tammy's bravery can be 
best exemplified by her 
attitude towards dogs. "We 
thought she'd be petrified of 
dogs" says her father, "but 
she says she wants another 
one." 

Her parents have told 
Tammy her dog is on a farm 
"But I think she knows the 
truth," her father says. 

Until last July, dogs were 
banned from the Snug Harbor 
and Riverview projects by 
Quincy Housing Authority 



James St. Angelo, 
President of the Harborview 
Residents Association, calls 
the Dog Officer's estimate 
"ridiculous" and says 
responsible tenants should 
not be punished for the 
actions of one or two dogs. 

The Harborview Resident's 
Association and the Quincy 
Housing Authority are 
presently negotiating a new 
model lease and one of the 
stumbling blocks is the 
QHA's insistence on a "no 
dog" clause that would 
supersede the DCA's ruling. 



'Micky 9 Rucker Undergoes Surgery To Save Sight 



[Cont'd from Page 1 ) 
little ones roller skating." 
The 'two little ones' are 



NOTICE 

to the Residents of the 

City of Quincy 

The annual listing of ALL 
residents of the city, Seventeen 

years of age and over will begin 

On Friday, February 1, 1974 

CENSUS TAKERS WILL CARRY PROPER IDENTIFICATION 

Ptr Order 

JOHN M. 6ILLIS 
City Clerk 

At rehired by Geeerel lew*. Chapter SI. Sectien 4 



brother David, 7, and sister 
Donna, 4. 

The other four Rucker 
children, all living at home, 
are Randy, 19, Ronald, 18, 
Sandra, 17, and Diane, 10. 

Their father Olin, is also at 
home - out of work until at 
least February because of an 
injured back. He was moving 
a -washing machine for the 
landlord in December when 
the machine fell on his back. 

"We don't know when he 
can go back to work. We have 
to wait for the doctor's 
permission," says Mrs. 



Rucker. 

With Mr. Rucker out of 
work and Mrs. Rucker 
running the large household, 
the two are not sure how 
they will pay for the series of 
operations that could 
stabilize the sight in Mickey's 
right eye. 

Micky is being treated by 
Dr. Harold Freeman, eye 
specialist at the Mass. Eye 
and Ear Infirmary in Boston. 

An honor roll student at 
Sterling Junior High, she had 
hoped to enter Quincy High 
School in September. 



PRE 
OPENING 




EVERYTHING MUST GO! 



All First Quality 

SHORT ROLLS REMNANTS 

SHAGS - PLUSHES - Heavy Duty COMMERCIALS 
WOOLS NYLONS HERCULONS 
also ODD SIZE AREA RUGS from $8. up 

Thurs. Jan. 24 thru Fri. Feb. 1 

FASHION FLOORS 

528 Washington Street 

QUINCY POINT 471-2865 

FORMERLY AT 1043 HANCOCK STREET 



Thursday, January 31 , 1974 Quincy Sun Page 3 



'Energy Monitor' 
Checking Thermostats 



Something new has been 
added to the Quincy city 
bureaucracy this week. 

He's an "energy monitor", 
who is charged with seeing to it 
that the various city 
departments don't bootleg a few 
extra BTU's out of their office 
thermostats. 

The holder of the job is 
Patrolman Matthew Pino, 
assigned temporarily from the 
Police Department. 

"Some of the departments are 
doing a good job," said 
Purchasing Agent Richard 
Newcomb, "and some of them 
are doing a bad job. Pino is going 
to work on the ones that aren't 
doing a good job." 



Pino began making his rounds 
Monday. 

Meanwhile, Newcomb 
disclosed that some city 
departments are doing such a 
good job turning their 
thermostats down that the city's 
oil consumption for December 
declined 39 per cent from the 
previous year. 

December, 1972 -- 165,560 
gallons. 

December, 1973 -- 100,609 
gallons. 

"We are a month through the 
heaviest heating months of the 
winter," he said, "and I'm 
hopeful that continued fuel 
conservation measures will see us 
through the winter." 



New Safety Measures 
Proposed For Sea St. 




A group of Ward I citizens has 
recommended new safety 
measures - including the posting 
of new speed limit signs - to 
alleviate dangerous traffic 
conditions on b'ea St. 

The group, led by Ward I 
Councillor Leo J. Kelly, also 
recommended: 

• Painting cross-walks with 
diagonal lines to bring them to 
the attention of motorists. 

•' Illumination of cross-walks 
wherever possible. 

• New discharge locations for 
MBTA school buses and better 
markings on the buses. 

Recently, two young girls 
were struck by a motor vehicle 
at the intersection of Curlew Rd 
and Sea St., but "positive action 
in this regard has been long 
overdue" according to Kelly. 

Schools, civic and church 
groups have been asked to warn 
area residents of traffic safety 
hazards and the Police 
Department has advised Kelly 
that traffic rules and regulations 
will be strongly enforced on Sea 
St. and other area streets, all of 



Gas Stations 

[Cont'd from Page 1 ] 

Quincy City Council an 
up-to-date report on all gasoline 
stations that are closed or 
abandoned, 

"I would also like a status 
report of all underground or 
above-the-ground tanks that 
would store oil or gasoline to 
assure that they are meeting the 
requirements of the General 
Laws pertaining to closed or 
abandoned gasoline stations. 

"I would suggest that you 
forward a copy of your report to 
Allan MacDonald, Building 
Inspector, so that he may be 
aware of the status of said 
stations. 



which have a 30 mph speed 
limit. 



YOUTH FOR SHEETS - Young people organize to raise money to help City Councillor-elect James A. 
Sheets fight for his Council seat in the courts. Left to right, William J. Fein, Mary Ann LaSelva, Timothy 
Leahy, Brian Walsh, Bob Paul, Michael Dwyer and William J. Walters. 




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Page 4 Quincy Sun Thursday, January 3 1 , 1974 

# Editorial 

The Cemetery Probe: 
Put Up Or Shut Up 



The cemetery department investigation seemed to be running out 
of gas until Councillor Joseph J. LaRaia refueled it last week with a 
very serious allegation. 

Mr. LaRaia, who has been the driving force behind the City 
Council Oversight Committee's probe of cemetery department 
irregularities-both fact and fiction-opened a new avenue. 

He said he has discovered five cases where grave lots in the last 
four years were re-possessed by the cemetery department, 
transferred and resold to new owners. 

He said he could find no evidence that the original owners had 
consented to the transfer and re-sale. 

If this is so, then somebody resold the five lots illegally. 
Felix Favorite, senior member of the cemetery Board of Managers 
has denied the allegation. He said his board has never given 
permission to reclaim grave lots without proper payment to and 
approval of the owner. 

Things however can happen--and have-without knowledge of the 
board. 

Mr. LaRaia has declined [at this writing] to identify the owners 
of the graves which he indicates were taken from them illegally. 

He has told this newspaper he would do so at the appropriate time 
and place--a meeting of the Oversight Committee. 
That should be done without delay. 

Mr. LaRaia, we assume , will be prepared to disclose the names of 
the original owners, when the grave lots were sold, to whom, by 
whom and how. 

Right now there must be a number of families in Quincy 
wondering if their lots have been sold without their consent. They 
deserve to know as soon as possible if that is so, or assured that their 
lots are still their property. 

And other families with lots or loved one buried in Mount 
Wollaston Cemetery or Pine Hill Cemetery must have a few fears of 
their own as various rumors continue to be spread around the city. 
Some of those spreading the stories insist they are fact. But if you 
ask them why don't they turn their information over to the 
Oversight Committee or to the police, they shrug: "Well, I can't 
prove it. But it's true. I know it for a fact." 

Meanwhile, innocent members of the cemetery department are 
being made suspect. So are some city officials. 

The public has a right to know what is fact and what is fiction. 
And they have the right to peace of mind. 

So far, the investigation has not turned up much more than the 
two incidents that were already known by the mayor and the entire 
City Council and brought about the resignation last November of the 
cemetery supertindendent; burying his father and step 
daughter-in-law in Mount Wollaston cemetery without paying for the 
two lots. He has since made restitution. 

The investigation has been dragging on for some weeks now. We 
hope it is not going to turn out to be a second-rate Watergate. 

Mr. LaRaia has made his allegation. Councillor John J. Quinn, 
chairman of the Oversight Committee should call the committee of a 
whole together immediately. Mr. LaRaia should be ready to 
document his allegation. And if he does, then proper action should 
be taken and prosecution begun. 

However, if Mr. LaRaia cannot substantiate his allegation, then 
maybe it's about time to terminate the investigation unless someone 
steps forward to prove some of the stories still circulating around 
town. 

We think it has got to that stage where you either put up or shut 
up. 





>T lfA$l HOOVER tfJW AfcW 7&KUNA DBPPESSiON ' 



WASHINGTON - The oil 
squeeze has caused world oil 
prices to skyrocket. The in- 
crease will add an estimated 
$75 billion to the price that 
oil-consuming countries 
must pay for their economic 
lifeblood. 

This is simply more than 
most nations can afford with- 
out inviting economic dis- 
aster. 

World leaders have been 
communicating secretly over 
how to cope with the oil 
crisis. The United States has 
taken the lead in urging the 
oil consumers to join 
together in planning a com- 
mon strategy. 

Most nations have been 
reluctant to challenge the 
Arabs openly for fear of los- 
ing their oil supply. A few na- 
tions, such as Britain and 
France, have sought to make 
their own private deals with 
the Arab oil producers. 

But secretly, many world 
leaders are saying that 
prices must be rolled back. 
Some are ready to use force, 
if necessary, to prevent an oil 
depression. 

Apparently, the message is 
getting through to the Arab 
leaders. Intelligence reports 
claim the Arab leaders are 
prepared to ease prices. 

Even the Russians, who 
originally encouraged the 
Arab price squeeze, are 
growing wary. Intelligence 
reports say Kremlin leaders 
now fear that prices could 
cause such severe economic 
dislocations that it could lead 
to a rise in fascism rather 
than Communism. 

It is beginning to look as if 
world pressure may force the 
Arabs to reduce oil prices. 

Behind Mills' Offer: House 
Ways and Means Chairman 
Wilbur Mills, probably the 
most powerful member of 
Congress, has offered to in- 
troduce legislation granting 
President Nixon immunity 
from prosecution if he will 
resign. Here's the story 
behind this extraordinary 
offer: 

Mills is conducting the in- 
vestigation into President 
Nixon's tax returns. This was 
requested by the President 
himself to determine whether 
he owes more taxes. The 
central controversy is over 
the $576,000 tax deduction he 
claimed for giving his vice 

• Historic 
Moments 

ROOSEVELT BORN 

Franklin D. Roosevelt, 32nd 
president, was born on Jan. 
30.1882. 

ADOLF HITLER 
Adolf Hitler was named 
chancellor of the German 
Reich on Jan. 30, 1933. 
STENNIS SHOT 
John C. Stennis, 71-year-old 
senator from Mississippi, was 
shot in robbery attempt in 
front of his home in Washing- 
ton, D.C., on Jan. 30, 1973. 
H-BOMB 
DEVELOPED 
President Harry S Truman 
announced development of 
hydrogen bomb on Jan 31 
1950. 



Jack Anderson 

Pulitzer Prize Winner for National Reporting, and 
Syndicated Columnist for The Quincy Sun. 

# Arabs To Ease Oil Prices? 
% The Nixon Immunity Offer 
^ Foreign Power Slipping 

(Copyright, 1«74, by United Feature Syndicate. Inc.) 



presidential papers to the 
government. 

Mills' investigators have 
now established that the 
deed, turning over the 
papers, was backdated to 
make it appear that they 
were donated before July 25, 
1969. Thereafter, tax deduc- 
tions were no longer allowed 
for historical papers. 

The investigators have also 
uncovered that Ralph New- 
man, the appraiser, didn't 
even select which papers 
should be donafed until 
November 1969 - four 
months after the deadline. 

The use of a backdated 
deed to gain more than a 
half-million dollar tax deduc- 
tion could indicate possible 
fraud and tax evasion. The 
Nixon tax returns, of course, 
were signed by the President 
and the First Lady who are 
legally responsible for the 
statements therein. 

It's the possibility of tax 
fraud that prompted Wilbur 
Mills to seek immunity from 
prosecution for the President 
in return for his resignation. 

Foreign Fears: Almost 
desperately, President Nixon 
is stressing his foreign policy 
skills as the trump card in his 
struggle to stay in office. He 
has told friends fiercely that 
no one else is as qualified as 
he is to play the delicate bal- 
ance-of-power game with the 
two Communist superpowers. 
He has reminded them of his 
diplomatic achievements in 
Peking, Moscow and the Mid- 
dle East. 

The White House took 
pains to inform newsmen 
that the President sent Sec- 
retary of State Henry 
Kissinger daily guidance in- 
structions during the sensi- 
tive negotiations in the Mid- 
dle East. 

But the secret diplomatic 
messages from around the 
world indicate that Nixon is 
hurting, not helping, Ameri- 
can foreign policy. The dis- 
patches from Europe, in par- 
ticular, suggest that our 
European allies have lost 
confidence in Nixon and are 
worried about his ability to 
commit the United States. It 
is clear from the secret 
messages that the Western 
alliance is deteriorating. 

In the Middle East, 
Kissinger encountered 
guarded but anxious inqu- 
iries about Nixon. The 
Israelis, who had counted 



heavily upon Nixon's support, 
expressed special concern 
that he is losing his power. 

Even in the Kremlin, ac- 
cording to the secret in- 
telligence reports, there is an 
understanding that Nixon 
has been mortally weakened. 
The messages from Peking, 
typically, are more enig- 
matic. But increasingly, 
Kissinger appears as the man 
who is holding American 
foreign policy together. 

Privately, State Depart- 
ment strategists are saying 
Kissinger could do this even 
better under a President 
Ford than President Nixon. 

An Antitax Year: The In- 
ternal Revenue Service is 
afraid 1974 might be a bad 
year. Voluntary compliance 
is the bedrock of the tax 
system. Audits are run only 
on a random basis. Therefore, 
the government must depend 
upon the honesty of its 
citizens to collect taxes. 

The IRS is afraid that the 
voluntary system has been 
eroded by the events of the 
past year. First, ex-Vice 
President Spiro Agnew was 
caught cheating on his taxes. 
Now President Nixon, him- 
self, is in tax trouble. 

But more than anything 
else, the high profits and low 
taxes of the oil companies are 
stirring up antitax feelings. 
Many .Americans no longer 
feel they are taxed fairly. For 
every dollar that the oil com- 
panies escape paying in taxes 
must be made up by the rest 
of the taxpayers. 

The energy crisis has also 
persuaded some people that 
they can get away with cheat- 
ing on their taxes. For weeks 
now, the IRS has been receiv- 
ing complaints about price 
gouging at the gas pumps. 
Yet only a few stations have 
been taken to court. The IRS 
simply doesn't have the man- 
power to run down all the 
complaints. 

So Americans have seen 
many stations get away with 
charging outrageous prices. 
The aura of enforcement once 
surrounding the IRS has been 
damaged and our IRS sources 
say some people may be en- 
couraged to fudge on their 
tax returns. 

The revelations of 1973, in 
other words, might have 
serious consequences for the 
IRS in 1974. 



&\l/, 



c:*> 



w 



Published weekly on Thursday by 

The Quincy Sun Publishing Company 

1601 Hancock St., Quincy, Massachusetts 02169 

Publisher and Editor 

Henry W. Bosworth, Jr. 

Advertising Director 

John B. Powers 

10a 7 Per Copy - $3.50 Per Year - Out of State $4.50 Per Year 

Telephone: 471-3100 471-3101 471-3102 

Second-Class Postage Paid at Boston, Mass. 

MEMBER NEW ENGLAND PRESS ASSOCIATION 

The Quincy Sun assumes no financial responsibility for 

typographical errors in advertisements but will reprint that part of 

an advertisement in which the typographical error occurs. 



Thursday, January 31 , 1974 Quincy Sun Page 5 



Sunbeams 



Bellotti Reportedly Calling 
Key Campaign Men 

' By HENRY BOSWORTH 

Word around town is that Quincy's Francis Bellotti has started to 
contact past campaign key men in an apparent move to ready a 
kickoff drive for attorney general. 

A few months ago, Bellotti reportedly wasn't interested in 
returning to the political arena. Friends said he was too busy with 
his law practice, anyway. 

But now that Atty. General Robert Quinn is a definite candidate 
for governor, that post is open and tempting. 

And, the attorney general's office has been a springboard to the 
governor's suite. Deep down inside, Bellotti would still like to be 
governor someday. 

The former lieutenant governor's entrance into the attorney 
general's office no doubt will come as a jolt to Norfolk County 
Register of Deeds Barry Hannon. The Braintree Democrat probably 
was among those thinking Bellotti would be sitting this one out. 

Bellotti, of course, still hasn't said he definitely will be a 
candidate. But he's acting like one. 

*** 

INCIDENTALLY, Bellotti's son, Peter, has turned out to be quite 
a basketball player. He's playing guard for the Northfield Mount 
Hermon varsity team in East Northfield, Mass. 

*♦* 

WITH CLIFFORD MARSHALL'S hat now officially in the ring 
for Norfolk County Sheriff, there should be a few announcements 
popping in his state representative district. 

Marshall, of course, has to relinquish his Beacon Hill seat to make 
his bid for the sheriffs badge long pinned to the lapel of Republican 
Charles Hedges. 

Potential candidates in the Wards 2-3 district include: Former 
Councillor Theophilus McLelland, James Papile, Dean Nicastro. 
School Committeeman Harold Davis, Peter Gacicia and Atty. Tom 
Williams. 

And, there could be one or two more of stage twirling their hats. 

The announcements should come early to line up 
supporters-financial and actual workers. 

*¥* 

AN ESTIMATED 3,000 or more turned out for Sunday's 
reception at The Lantana, Randolph, where Marshall officially 
kicked off his campaign for sheriff. And if you're wondering where 
they might stand, Mayor Walter Hannon [Republican] and 
Sen.-Council President Arthur Tobin [Democrat] announced that 
they are solidly behind Marshall, a Democrat. 

¥*# 

SPEAKING OF THE sheriffs race, sources close to incumbent 
Hedges say he is still showing signs of warming up to another run. A 
few months ago he had just about ruled himself out as a candidate 
for re-election. 

If he finally decides not to make the bid, look for Deputy Sheriff 
John Brownell to join Marshall and County Commissioner George 
McDonald as contenders. Brownell is the father of state Rep. 
Thomas Brownell [D-Quincy] . 

BEAUTY AND BRAINS: Pretty Patricia Kelley, Miss Quincy Bay 
Race Week of 1973, is now secretary to William Trifone, director of 
the Quincy Neighborhood Youth program. 

Pat, however, is also continuing her modeling career with the 
Carol Nashe Agency of Boston. One of her favorite assignments was 
a small part in a recent Banacek TV episodes. It wasn't a speaking 
part, but Pat didn't mind. She got to stroll down Boylston St. with 
star George Peppard. And with his arm around her. "It was super," 
she smiled. 

WELCOME, JOE: Joseph McLaughlin, the Herald-American's 
"Tell It To Joe" columnist was honored back in November, 1962 at 
the Statler Hilton. Among Quincy guests were then Mayor Amelio 
Delia Chiesa, late Police Chief William Ferrazzi and City Clerk John 
Gillis. 

Delia Chiesa presented him with an honorary Quincy citizen 
certificate. Now Joe is a full-fledged Quincy citizen. Has moved into 
a house on South St., Quincy Center. 

Delia Chiesa, of course, has since moved to Pembroke. Maybe Joe 
could let him have his honorary citizen certificate. 

TYPO TERROR DEPT: From the New York News: The Rangers, 
losers the last two straight nights, came out for blood. They won, 5 
pints to 2. 

SMILE DEPT: Vin Contrino, the South Quincy tonsorial artist, 
tells about the youngster who was lifted into the chair and asked: 
"How do you want your hair cut, son?" 

"Like Dad's," the boy replied. "With a hole in the top." 




In 1789, Benjamin Franklin denounced as barbaric the 
words: "to advocate," "to progress," and "to oppose." 



• QUESTION 

What Is 

Impeachment 

Procedure? 

"If the President is 
impeached, does he immediately 
leave office?" asked a 
government student. "No" 
answered the volunteer at the 
Voter Information Phone of the 
League of Women Voters of 
Massachusetts. 

Impeachment is a formal 
accusation by majority vote in 
the House of Representatives 
that one or more "impeachable 
offences" has been committed. 
It is a vote of accusation by the 
House, comparable to 
indictment by a grand jury. 

This is followed by an 
impeachment trial by the 
Senate, comparable to a trial by 
jury in court. The Chief Justice 
of the Supreme Court presides at 
the impeachment trial. 
Conviction requires a two-third 
vote of the Senators present. 
The penalty for conviction is 
removal from office and 
disqualification from any future 
office. 

In brief, the House impeaches 
(indicts], the Senate tries the 
case, the Chief Justice is the 
presiding "judge", and a 
two-third vote of the Senators 
present is required for 
conviction. 

This question is one of the 
many now being received by the 
League of Women Voters Voter 
Information Phone. Individual's 
with any questions on 
government may call the VIP 
phone Monday through Friday 
between 10 a.m. and 2 p.m. The 
number in the Boston area is 
357-5880. 

Post Office 

Seeks Stamp 
Devotees 

The Quincy Post Office is 
attempting to contact local 
stamp clubs, through their 
president or other club officials 
announces manager Thomas F. 
O'Neill. 

The Post Office is also trying 
to locate and communicate with 
ardent philatelists, on an 
individual basis, as well. 

Communications can be 
accomplished by contacting the 
Manager, Quincy BR, 02169, 
either by phone or by letter. 

1972 Election 
Statistics Book 
Available Free 

A 560-page book full of 1972 
, election statistics is now 
available free from the Elections 
Division, Room 235 State 
House, State Secretary John F. 
X. Davoren announces. 

Compiled in the office of 
Secretary Davoren, chief 
election officer of the 
Commonwealth, it includes 
returns filed under the Corrupt 
' Practices Act, statistics of all 
presidential primary and races 
for the Republican and 
Democratic state committee as 
well as tabulations on the 
various referendum. 

Included are all county 
election results held in 1972 for 
such contests as Sheriff, County 
Commissioner, Register of 
Deeds. Of interest to many are 
the statistics showing how voters 
favored the mandatory 
retirement of judges at age 70, 
lowering the drinking age to 18 
and the issue of prayers in 
schools. 

Also available is a 600-page 
paper-back entitled, "Primaries, 
Caucuses and Elections with 
Legislation of 1972 included." It 
is also free and may be obtained 
in the election division. 



Living, Today 

By Dr. William F. Knox 
Personal Counselor 



'Our Neglected Wives' 



"I just feel so alone ... Toni 
was saying. Jack says I am only 
making myself unhappy ... that I 
should be thankful for what I 
have ... but he doesn't seem to 
understand how I feel. He's just 
going all the time. I have so little 
time with him. I really feel 
neglected. Maybe he needs less 
affection than I do ... maybe 
there's something wrong with me 
... but I'm just not happy." Toni 
broke into sobs ... "Please ... Dr. 
Knox ...help me." 

This is not an unusual episode 
in our offices ... the sad ... heart 
rending emotional suffering of 
affection-starved women. 
Whenever possible I like to talk 
with their husbands to help them 
to see the needs of their wives for 
more of their time ... and 
affection. Many men do not mean 
to be inconsiderate ... but to hear 
it from someone who has no axe 
to grind often helps the 
relationship to improve 
significantly. We need to realize 
that normal ... healthy women .„ 
just as normal ... healthy men ... 
need relationship with the 
opposite sex which is supporting 
and rewarding. Yes ... you can live 
without it ... or get it from a cat ... 
or a parrakeet ... but that is just 
making the best of a bad situation 
... doesn't really meet those 
human needs. 

COMPANIONSHIP is what 
marriage is all about. Not many 
girls get married just so they can 
cook for someone „. do some 
man's dirty laundry. Yet ...that's 
the life of too many wives. If they 
complain ... they're told, "You 
have a roof over your head ... 
food to eat ... and don't have to 
go out 'to work. What more can 
you want?" Her simple ... 
unqualified answer might be 
COMPANIONSHIP ... A 
PERSONAL ... WARM ... 
CARING ... relationship with a 
man with whom 1 can share my 
life." 

Too many of us men have let 
other things in our lives lead to 
the neglect of our wives. Our 



WORK ... as important as it is to 
ourselves and our families ... 
should not be allowed to spoil the 
marriage relationship. Our 
RECREATION ... whether golf ... 
cards ... out with the boys ... if 
overdone can be destructive to a 
warm companionship with the 
"woman I love". 

The OTHER WOMAN with 
whom a man has occasional 
affairs is also detrimental to a 
marriage ... The O'Neill's "Open 
Marriage" notwithstanding. Most 
men can't handle both the home 
and "outside" situations. Most 
women can't tolerate it either. 
What I'm saying is ... a warm 
companionable marriage is a 
precious thing ... and should get 
top priority in a person's 
emotional life and schedule. 
The wife herself can do much 
, to preserve the quality of the 
marriage. She must love herself 
enough to keep herself healthy ... 
feminine ... communicative. If a 
man cant respond to that in his 
wife ... doesn't' enjoy such 
fineness ... he will do well to 
examine his own attitude toward 
women. 

Each must restore and 
cultivate those qualities which led 
them to begin loving each other ... 
whether a few months ago or 
many years. There's still no 
substitute for genuine love ... 
affection ... sexual fulfillment to 
make a marriage work. These are 
not substitutes for cadi ... oil ... 
beef steak. But people have been 
known to love each other frying 
eggs over a fireplace ... in a log 
cabin ... as the coyotes howled 
and the snow drifted outside. The 
thermostat in a loving man and 
woman still is more powerful to a 

marriage than what Simon says. 

• * • * 

FOR YOUR COMMENTS: For 
private counseling, group 
counseling, contact Dr. Knox at 
659-7595 or 326-5990. For his 
book "People Are For Loving" 
send $3.00 with your name and 
address to Dr. Knox at 320 
Washington St., Norwell, Mass. 
02061. 



•Youth Speaks Out 

• Although inflation is bad, something actually went down - 
students' grades after mid-year. 

• Richard M. Nixon: "To the best of my recollection, I am not a 
crook." 

• Mothers used to send their little girls to ballet school. Now they 
send them to Karate school, so they'll be prepared to walk to school 
in the dark. 

• There is a new team in the WFL called The Chicago Fire. We 
wonder what's next - The San Francisco Earthquake and The Boston 
Massacre? 

• It used to be every mother's dream to have her little boy grow up 
to be President - now it's every mother's nightmare. 

• Don't go to see "The Exorcist" - it will scare the Devil out of you. 

• A list of games commonly played by Nixon, the government, the 
oil companies-etc. 

1 - Monopoly, 2 - Simon Says, 3 - Stratego, 4 - King of the 

Mountain, 5 - To Tell The Truth, 6 - Easy Money, 7 - Tape Tape 

Who's Got The Tape, 8 - Trouble, 9 - The Price Is Right, 10 - Don't 

Spill The Beans. 

QHS Journalism Class 

Federal Tax Guide 
On Sale At Post Officers 



Postmaster George K. Walker 
announces that the official 
Internal Revenue Service guide, 
"Your Federal Income Tax", is 
on sale again at all Post Offices 
in the Boston Postal District. 

The booklet provides 
assistance to taxpayers filing 
separate or joint returns. It 
contains sample completed 



forms with entries keyed to 
appropriate pages and many 
clear examples of ' allowable 
expenses, deductions and 
contributions. 

Postmaster Walker said this 
year's revised edition, priced at 
$ 1 . is expected to be another 
"best seller" 



Up 6 Quincy Sim Thursday, January 3 1 , 1974 

St. Arm's Marianns 
To Praaant 'Clowning Around' 



St Ana's Mariaam, of 
Wollaston will present 
"Clowning Around" a Minstrel 
show by Ed Rooney 
Productions, Saturday, Sunday 
and Monday at 8:30 p.m. in St. 
Ann's School Hall. 

Choreography will be by 
Marianne Dennis. Accompanist 
is Marie Wooldridge. 

A special childrens 
performance will be held on 
Saturday at 2 p.m. 

Heading the committee are 
Mrs. Joseph Sullivan, Mrs. 
Nicholas Fasano and Mrs. Paul 
O'Brien assisted by Mrs. John 
Dunlea, Mrs. Walter Lynch, ad 
book. Mrs. Donald Haley, 
tickets. Mrs. Peter Golden, Mrs. 
Donald McGowan, publicity. 

Usherettes are: Deirdre 
Durkin, Linda Golden, Barbara 
Haley, Eileen Haley and Joanne 
Meehan. 




MRS. NICHOLAS FASANO 

Tickets for all performances 
are available from cast members 
or by calling 479-8096, 

773-2226. 



Legal Secretaries 
Install 5 New Members 



The Norfolk County Legal 
Secretaries Association installed 
five new members at its recent 
meeting, which was followed by 
a Mock Trial at Quincy District 
Courthouse. 

Installed were Jeanne H. 
Brock of Needham, employed 
by Norwood Atty. John P. 
Connor Jr.; Cecile Noonan of 
Braintree, employed by 
Marshfield Atty. Thomas P. 
Kramer; Paul Verderber of 
Walpole, employed by Norwood 
Atty. Richard A. Griffin; Rita J. 
Webster of Randolph, employed 
by Marshfield Atty. Charles O. 
Monahan; and Ann E. Tyeryar, 
employed by Attorneys Flavin, 
McCormick and Corcoran of 
Quincy. 

Participants in the Mock Trial 
held at the Quincy Courthouse - 
after the meeting were: Dennis 
F. Ryan, Clerk of the Quincy 



Court, who acted as "Judge" 
and gave the members pointers 
and information; Quincy 
Attorneys Paul A. M. Hunt and 
Richard W. Barry, who 
prosecuted and defended; and 
Court Officer Roger Whitcomb. 

Involved parties and witnesses 
were portrayed by Association 
members Susan Sonenshein. 
PLS. president of the Norfolk 
County Chapter, Carol B. 
McGrath. Nancy Cedarstrom. 
past president of the 
Association. Quincy Atty. James 
A. Shannon portrayed a Quincy 
police lieutenant and Quincy 
Atty. Henry Kidder acted as an 
attending physician giving his 
medical testimony. 

There will be a champagne 
auction following the Feb. 25 
meeting. Anyone interested in 
joining the Association may 
contact Mrs. Jeanne Pittman at 
769-2606. 



Quincy Women Help Plan Valentine Party 



Mrs. Frank Barrlett and Mrs. 
William DeJulie, both of Quincy, 
will take part in a Valentine 
Party to be held Feb. 12 at the 



Baptist Home of Massachusetts 
in Newton, sponsored by the 
Home's Women's Auxiliary. 



TIMEX 



® 



Factory authorized Service Center 

In and Out-of Warranty Watches Repaired 

Genuine TIMEX Energy Cells available 



^OCf&lS 



Jewelers 



1 402 HANCOCK STREET QUINCY 
773-6340 



Marriage 
Intentions 



James W. Ward, 23 Harding 
Rd, Melrose, bank teller; 
Loriann E. Schmale, 274 
Washington St., Quincy, 
executive secretary. 

Brendon W. Riley, 1 16 Glover 
Ave., Quincy, technician; Jeanne 
L. McEachern, 14 Chapman St., 
Quincy, waitress. 

Robert J. Speidel, 36 
Chimney Lane, Levittown, N.Y., 
U.S.A.F.; Anne Kennedy, 68 
Tyler St., Quincy, registered 
nurse. 

Arthur P. Boyle, 35 Agawan 
Road, Quincy, student; Judith 
A. Foley, 41 Algonquin Road, 
Quincy, student. 

Edward W. Lindback, 24 
Vinton St., Randolph, nurse; 
Deborah A. Leuchte, 27 Nut 
Island Ave., Quincy, nurse. 




ENROLLS - Miss Carol 
Connolly of 28 Madeleine St., 
Houghs Neck, has enrolled at the 
Katharine Gibbs School in 
Boston for the Advanced 
Section of the one-year 
Secretarial Program. Miss 
Connolly, the daughter of Mr. 
and Mrs. William Connolly, is 
graduating this year from 
Quincy High School. 

Cousins Born 

Same Day But 

An Ocean Apart 

George William Duflcan and 
Lisa Marie Duncan are cousins, 
born the same day but an ocean 
apart. 

George, son of Mr. and Mrs. 
George Duncan of Copeland St., 
Quincy, was born Jan. 19 at 
Quincy City Hospital. 

Lisa, daughter of Sgt. and 
Mrs. David Duncan came into 
the world later the same day in 
an Air Force hospital in 
Bedford, England. 

Sgt. Duncan is from North 
Quincy, stationed in England. 



Will! 




...who remembers this building 
and where it was located? 
Answer next week. 



PHOTO COURTESY OF THOMAS CRANE PUBLIC LIBRARY 



Do you remember when your 
last property valuation took 
place? Do you know who your 
insurance company is? Talk 
with us at Burgin-Platner. 

BURGIN 

PLATNER 

INS. 

1357 Hancock Street, 
Quincy 472-3000 



Mrs. William Ridder President 

- 

St. Margaret' s Auxiliary 



Mrs. William Ridder of 30 
Beach St., Wollaston, has been 
elected by unanimous vote, to 
the office of president of the 
Women's Auxiliary of St. 
Margaret's Hospital, Dorchester. 

Mrs. Ridder has the historical 
honor of being the first 
president elected to this newly 
formed group. In its 100 year 
history, this is the first Auxiliary 
ever to be formed at St. 
Margaret's Hospital. 

The wife of Quincy surgeon, 
Dr. William P. Ridder, she is a 
member of the Quincy Doctors 
Wives Association, and the 
Womens Auxiliary to the Mass 
Medical Society. 

Mrs. Ridder and her slate of 
officers were installed at the 
groups first membership tea held 
recently at the hospital. 

Mrs. Ridder has many plans 
for the Auxiliary with the 
advent of the hospital's 100th 
anniversary this year and the 
addition of a totally modern 




MRS. WILLIAM P. RIDDER 

wing overlooking Boston 
Harbor, set for completion late 
this year. Any women interested 
in joining the group may do so 
by calling Mrs. Robert Dandrow 
of Milton, membership 
chairman, at 333-0101. 



Silver Tea Sunday To Open 
Art Association Exhibit 



A Silver Tea Sunday will mark 
the opening of the Quincy Art 
Association's Annual Exhibit at 
the Thomas Crane Public 
Library, 40 Washington St., 
Quincy Center. 

The tea will be from 2 to 4 
p.m. The exhibit will be on 
display through Feb. 26. 

The paintings that will be 
displayed were selected and 
judged by Evelyn Silvester, and 
Vera Freeman, both of 
Weymouth. 

The artists whose paintings 



will be exhibited are: Barbara 
Banuk, Ruth E. Beeman, Carole 
Cahill, Anita Coughlan, William 
D'Attilio, Mary Dhooge, 
Abraham A. Gammel, Edward J. 
Griffin, Randolph Haslett, Al 
LeNormand, Hugh MacFarlane, 
Edith MacKiernan, Eleanore V. 
McCarthy, Cyn-dee Mulligan, 
Kan-dee Mulligan, R. G. 
Mulligan, Pearl Neves, Annette 
Paglierani, Robert L. Roden, 
Phyllis Strungis, Cela Swirbalus, 
Marilyn Gene Tausevich, Olive 
Tompkins and Dorothy Parkin 
Wiltshire. 



Mrs Stanley Nelson 
Re-elected Ladies Aid Leader 



Mrs. Stanley Nelson of 
Magnolia St., Braintree, was 
re-elected leader of the Ladies' 
Aid Circle of Covenant 
Congregational Church, Quincy, 
at its annual meeting at the 
home of Mrs. Russell Sandblom 
of Milton St., Wollaston. 



Mrs. Nelson will be assisted by 
Mrs. Ruth Nelson of Wollaston, 
Mrs. Albert Anderson, Mrs. Tyra 
Andersen of Braintree, Mrs. 
Anna Jacobson, Mrs. Samuel 
Collins of Quincy, Mrs. Arvid 
Jacobson of Hyannis and Mrs. 
Elmer Butman of Norwell. 



Mothers Of Twins 
Plan 'Pound Auction' 



A "Pound Auction" will 
highlight the meeting of the 
South Shore Mothers of Twins 
Club Feb. 11, 8 p.m., at the 
George Bean Legion Post, 19 
Hollis St., South Weymouth. 

Each person attending is 
asked to bring one pound of 



either a humorous or useful 
item. It must have a 50-cent 
minimum value and should be 
wrapped or bagged. 

The club' recently published 
cookbook "Twincredible 
Edibles" is still available for sale. 



S4BIN4 



internal 



naV 



Beauty 



Sa\on 




SENIOR CITIZENS 

DISCOUNT 
60 YEARS AND UP 
6 DAYS A WEEK 
1 Wash & Set $2.0C 
1 Haircut 1.50 

Permanent Wave 
complete with 
wash, set & cut $8.95 up 



Customers 
under 60 yrs. 
Discount 

Mon., Tues. - Wed. 
Wash & Set 
$3.00 & up 



Hair Frosting 
$19.50 & up 
Tints $6.00 
Permanents 
$8.95 up 
Bleach $10.50 up j ; 
i 



'i 

'i 

i 

■ i 
'i 

■ i 

< . 



1 1 

i 

i 

i 

■ 
i 
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<> 
i 



COR. BEALE & HANCOCK STS. WALK-IN SERVICE 472-9687 



Thuriday, January 31 , 1974 Quincy Sun Page 7 




ENGAGED - Mr. and Mrs. Thomas E. Fallon of Wollaston announce 
the engagement of their daughter, Barbara Anne, to Coleman J. 
Walsh, Jr. He is the son of Mr. and Mrs. Coleman J. Walsh, Sr. also of 
Wollaston. Miss Fallon is a graduate of Archbishop Williams High 
School and Katharine Gibbs Secretarial School and is now attending 
Northeastern University. She is employed by Lever Brothers 
Company. Miss Fallon is the granddaughter of Mr. and Mrs. Bernard 
Brady of North Quincy. Mr. Walsh is a graduate of Boston College 
High School and will graduate from Bridgewater State College in 
June. He is presently employed by United Parcel Service and will be 
attending law school in the fall. A summer wedding is planned. 
[Mclntire's Photo Studio] 

Thayer Parent's Club 
Plans 24th Fashion Show 



The Thayer Academy Parent's 
Club is sponsoring its 24th 
annual fashion show "Les Follies 
de Milo" to be held Wednesday, 

March 6. at the school in Brain- 
tree. 

The Gallery Room of the 
Southworth Library of Thayer 
Academy was the meeting place 
of the fashion show committee 
hostessed by the General 
Chairwomen, Mrs. Frank Folino 
and Mrs. Vincent F. Jackmauh. 

The show promises to bring a 
flavor of "Early Spring" to the 
South Shore as Milo of Boston 
introduces its' couturior Samuel 
Chocron who has created within 
his collections an aura of easy 
elegance. 

A "Champagne Luncheon" 
will be served before the show 
and a musical preview will be 
presented under the direction of 
George M. Butler. 

Chairwoman for the various 
committees are: 

Arrangements, Mrs. John D. 
Hopkins; model liaison, Mrs. 
John L. Hickey; decorations, 
Mrs. Joseph E. Goulart; 
properties, Mrs. Francis Slattery 
and Mrs. Walter N. Bucken; 
program, Mrs. Robert J. Geogan 



and Mrs. Daniel J. de 
Benedict us; publicity, Mrs. 
James Rindone Jr.; 
refreshments, Mrs. Robert J. 
Colman, Mrs. Alfred DiRico and 
Mrs. Arthur T. Valicenti. 

Tickets and reservations, Mrs. 
Frederick Connolly and Mrs. 
Charles George; table settings, 
Mrs. Charles F. Field, Mrs. James 
J. Fitzpatrick and Mrs. Edward 
K. Wek;h; waitresses, , Mrs. 
Nicholas J. Philopoulos and Mrs. 
George J. Petros; ways and 
means, Mrs. Robert Cherubim 
arid Mrs. A. Albert Yurkstas. 

Also assisting are: 

Mrs. John J. Gallagher, Mrs. 
Jerome R. Nathan, Mrs. Sydney 
M. Covall, Mrs. J. Nagle, Mrs. 
Robert M. O'Day, Mrs. Alfred 
Weber, Mrs. Joseph Silva, Mrs. 
Richard M. McCormick, Mrs. 
Edwin J. Heap, Mrs. Edward 
Spector, Mrs. Thomas Browne, 
Mrs. Frederick H. Brandenburg, 
Mrs. Arthur Fiorini, Mrs. 
Theodore E. Heidenreich Jr., 
Mrs. Terry Goldman, Mrs. 
William J. Connor, Mrs. Colin F. 
MacDonald, Mrs. Frederick J. 
Sheehan, Mrs. George Keary, 
Mrs. Charles Gale and Mrs. M. 
Bernstein. 



t 



Mr., Mrs. Denis Curtin 
Parents Of Daughter 



Mr. and Mrs. Denis Curtin of 
118 Glover Ave., North Quincy 
are the parents of a daughter, 



Annmarie, born Jan. 15, at St. 
Margaret's Hospital, Dorchester. 



We are interested in PURCHASING 
& APPRAISING precious jewels. 

FREE CONSULTATION FOR PRIVATE 
OWNERS, BANKERS &» ATTORNEYS 

Robert S. Freeman Certified Gemologist 
Call 773-2170 HARTS Jiwetort 

1422 Hancock St, Quincy, Mass. 





At Quincy City Hospital 

January 18 

Mr. and Mrs. Daniel Walsh, 56 
Euclid Ave., a daughter. 

January 19 

Mr. and Mrs. George Duncan, 
332 Copeland St., a son. 

January 20 

Mr. and Mrs. Daniel 
MacDonald, 1 Atherton St., a 
son. 

January 2 1 

Mr. and Mrs. Hugh Meighan, 
47 Newbury Ave., a son. 

January 22 

Mr. and Mrs. Pedro Negron, 
401 Palmer St., a son. 

Mr. and Mrs. Carl Soderstrom, 
7 Germaine Ave., a daughter. 

Mr. and Mrs. Henry Curtis Jr., 
163 Grandview Ave., a son. 

Mr. and Mrs. Louis Sabadini, 
42 Apthorp St., a daughter. 

January 23 

Mr. and Mrs. Robert R. 
DeForest, 469a Sea St., a son. 

At St. Margaret's Hospital 
January 15 

Mr. and Mrs. Denis Curtin, 
1 18 Glover Ave., a daughter. 

January 17 

Mr. and Mrs. Thomas Brown, 
283 Fayette St., a son. 

Mr. and Mrs. Thomas 
Montville, 44 Ferndale Road, a 
son. 

January 18 

Mr. and Mrs. Francis Kiley, 70 
Hamden Circle, a daughter. 

January 20 

Mr. and Mrs. Thomas F. 
Brownell, IS Moreland Road, a 
son. 

Mr. and Mrs. Francis Kearns, 
25 Wollaston Ave., a son. 




ENGAGED - Mr. and Mrs. George K. Regan of 214 Arlington St., 
Wollaston, announce the engagement of their daughter, Marianne 
Theresa to Jeremiah F. Foley Jr., son of Mr. and Mrs. Jeremiah 
Foley of 57 Cheryl Drive, Milton. Miss Regan is a graduate of 
Quincy Junior College and also attended Boston State College. She is 
employed by the First National Bank of Boston. Mr. Foley is a 
graduate of Massasoit Community College and Boston College. He is 
self-employed. 

Bethany Women's Union 
To Hear Dr. Eleanor Shore 



Dr. Eleanor G. Shore, M.D. 
will address the Feb. 6 Bethany 
Women's Union meeting on the 
subject "Protection for the 
Consumers of Medical Care". 

Her talk will include a review 
of drugs and vaccines, the latest 
information on patient advocate 
programs in hospitals, and a bill 
of rights for patients in one 
hospital. 

Dr. Shore is the daughter of 
Mrs. Paul Gossard of Quincy and 
the late Superintendent of 



Schools Dr. Paul Gossard, as well 
as Assistant in Medical Areas to 
Harvard University President 
Derek Bok, and an outstanding 
speaker. 

The Bethany Women's Union 
meeting and program will begin 
at 1:15. Everyone interested in 
this subject of public health will 
be most welcome. Dr. Shore will 
allow time for questions and 
answers from the audience after 
her talk. 



4 Quincy Residents Ticket Chairmen For SSARC Dance 



Mr. and Mrs. Murray Roberts 
and Mr. and Mrs. Benjamin 
Landey of Quincy are ticket 
chairmen for the annual 
dinner-dance of the South Shore 
Association of Retarded Citizens 



[SSARC] to be held at the 
Sheraton Tara Hotel, Braintree, 
Feb. 2. 

Four people from Boston and 
the South Shore will receive' 
special awards for their service 



to retarded citizens of the South 
Shore. 

For details and reservations 
call the SSARC, 1201 
Commercial Si., Weymouth at 
331-1255. 



DERRINGER * 

THE FLORIST 

Plants Arrangements Flowers 
389 HANCOCK ST. 773-0959 ! 



»—» — —»——»—»——» 



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Social Center 



120 Quarry St., Quincy 

Newest function hall now available for weddings, showers, dinner, 
dances. Main [Golden Lion] Suite has cathedral ceiling. Brides 
room • ultra modern sound system. Completely air conditioned. 

FOR RESERVATION CALL 
773-2687 AFTER 2 P.M. 



UNWANTED 

HAIR 

MARLENE 
MELAMED RE. 



Registered and Licensed 
Electrologist 
1151 Hancock St. 
Quincy 
By Appointment only 

Call 773-1330 

FORMERLY 
FREDERICK S. HILL 



SAVE 20% 

TO 50% 

Dresses - Pantsuits 
Sportswear - Sizes 8 To 20 



FASHION SH0PPE 



1538 Hancock St., Quincy 

Mon. thru Sat. 10 to 5 Thurs. & Fri. til 
773-4748 




Page 8 Quincy Sun Thursday, January 31 , 1974 



YOUR HANDWRITING TELLS 

She's not sure 
about boyfriend 



By DOROTHY 

ST. JOHN JACKSON 

Certified Master 

Graphoanalyst 

Copley News Service 

Dear Dorothy: 

My problem is me. I have a 
boy friend who doesn't want 
anyone but me. I like him but 
not to the extent that he likes 
me. I can't decide if I would 
be happier as a social worker 
or an elementary teacher or 
as his wife. He says we could 
do something for the world as 
a team, but I have my doubts. 
I think we could be happily 
married if we could iron this 
out. What do you think? I'm in 
college now. 

C.C. 

Dear C.C.: 

When that heavenly flush of 
love consumes your whole be- 
ing, you'll know it. When the 
tender trap is sprung, you'll 
not be comparing social work 
or teaching with marriage. 

That small loop on capital H 
will plague you as long as you 
will let it. It keeps you holding 
on to your boy friend simply 
because you don't want any- 
one else to have him. You love 
being wanted, seen in the up- 
swing word endings. 

It is hard enough for you to 



guide your life into the proper 
channel, seen in your weak t 
crossing, without giving your 
feelings the upper-hand, seen 
in your forward slant. The 
short d says you want what 
you want, and the rigid begin- 
ning upstrokes resist any out- 
side infringement. These are 
the important factors in your 
present dilemma. They are 
not obvious in your outward 
behavior, though, because 
you have them hidden be- 
neath a smooth coverup, seen 
in the tapering of your m's. 
You know exactly what to say 
and do, and this only keeps 
him wanting you . . . more and 
more. 

You're not really in love. 
When you are, you'll know it. 
Best you stay in college and 
study social sciences. At 
least, it would be safer, at the 
present time — than mate- 
evaluation. 

D.J. 

Selected letters will be an- 
swered through ihis column. 
A free handwriting chart of 
some common basic person- 
ality traits may be obtained 
by writing to Dorothy St. John 
Jackson, Copley News Serv- 
ice, in care of this newspaper. 
Enclose long, self-addressed, 
stamped envelope. 






T 





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rations & Kickanhon 

INSURANCE AGENCY 
INC 

"Be Sure Now-Not Sorry Later" 



1245 HANCOCK ST. 



Opposite Quincy 
Center MBTA 



PResident 3-1276 




ONCE OVER LIGHTLY 

Stuck with 16 bricks 



By ANN RUDY 

Shirley Turner is an English 
housewife who had surgeons 
from Nottingham General 
Hospital cement her mouth 
shut so she'd lose weight. 

I found this story heart- 
warming. It's nice to know 
there are still surgeons for 
whom there is no job too 
small. Because, Shirley, if 
you had tried to find a regular 
cement worker to shut your 
mouth for you, you might still 
be gaining weight. 

Only last spring I was in 
need of a little cement work 
myself and I let my fingers do 
the walking through the yel- 
low pages until I found an ad 
which sounded right for me. 

"Residential work," it read, 
"Fast. Dependable. Deliv- 



eries 6 days a week. Any size 
load. Radio dispatched 
trucks." 

I wanted 16 bricks laid 
around the edge of my patio, 
so I piled up the bricks before 
I dialed in case one of the ra- 
dio dispatched trucks with 
any size load should come 
right over. 

The man who answered the 
phone had a Wallace Beery 
voice, and when I told him 
what I wanted there was a 
long pause. Finally, he said, 
"Lady, we don't deliver noth- 
ing less than a yard of ce- 
ment. That's 3,600 pounds and 
it'll run ya $40." 

I asked him what I should 
do, and he suggested I buy a 
sack of cement and mix it my- 
self. 



no cement 



When I told him I was a sex- 
ist and cultivated the vapors 
in order to preserve what lit- 
tle leverage I had left, and 
that because of my value sys- 
tem I could not mix cement 
myself, he said call a neigh- 
bor. 

Shirley Turner, I know what 
you must have gone through 
trying to get your mouth shut. 
You couldn't have needed 
more than a quarter cup of ce- 
ment and a little deft trowel 
work. 

But I'm glad your persis- 
tence paid off, and as soon as 
you get your mouth open I'd 
like the name of your doctor. 
My 16 bricks are still piled up 
in the patio, waiting. 



Collecting odd names is bobby 



Evert Williams, head of 
Florida's Bureau of Vital Sta- 
tistics, collects unusual 



South Shore Beauty Supply 



names as his hobby. 

Some of the more bizarre 
names in his list are two boys 
christened Cigar Stubbs and 
Mac Aroni, girls named Etta 



CONVENIENCE 
ANEW 

GIFT 

BoyiJQ^ 



Complete Selection ol 
World Famous Beauty 
Aids at Discount Prices 
1612 Hancock St. 
Quincy 472-9000 
Across from Sears 
Open 9 to 9 Mon., Thurs., Fri. 
9 to 6 Tues., Wed., Sat. 



°™P'ete 
ect, '°n f 
Wigs 
Styling 

and 
Sale, 




Apple, Merry C. Christmas 
and Cherry Pye, but Williams 
considers the most unusual 
name that given to a boy 
called Five-Eighth Jameson. 

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Health 
High-Lights 



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and GALS 

BLOW CUTTING 

$5 



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27 COTTAGE AVE. QUINCY 

WOW! Do You Feel The 
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$ 12 



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Frosting 
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$3" 



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WALK-IN SERVICE 



Mon. Tues. & Wednesdays 

Month of Feb. • Quincy Shop Only 



Call for an Appointment 

472-1500-472-9544 



By Jack Silverstein 
ir»on oooo ounnn iii K i ouun « no o u o uu o uua oo« Bnuu ii rinnnrf 



FIRE QUIZ FOR CHILDREN 



1 - True or false: It' there is a 
tire in your house, you should not 
tell anyone, but, first - call the 
fire department. Ans.: False, 
Always get everyone out of the 
house first. Then notify the fire 
department. 

2 - True or false: Smoke 
contains poisonous gases and can 
Kill you if you breathe much of it 
Ans.: True. The best way to avoid 
smoke is to keep as low as 
possible because smoke rises and 
works its way downward in a 
room. 

3 - True or false: You should 
always sleep with your bedroom 
door closed. Ans.: True. A closed 
door is the best defense against 
spreading fire. ' 



4 - True or false: If your 
clothes catch on fire, you should 
run for help. \ns.: False. Running 
is the worst thing you can do. Wrap 
yourself in a blanket or rug or roll 
on the floor or ground to smother 
the flames. 

♦ * * 

This information has been 
brought to you as a public service 
by NABORHOOD PHARMACY, 
406 Hancock St, No. Quincy, 
where you can always count on 
friendly, professional service. 
Hospital equipment and supplies 
for rent or sale. Let us keep your 
prescription tax and insurance 
records. Phone: 773-6426. 



Your Horoscope Guide 



Thursday, January 31 , 1974 Quincy Sun Page 9 



For The Week Of 
February 3 to 9 

By GINA 
Copley News Service 

ARIES: (March 21 to April 

19 — Also Aries Ascendant) — 

Strike out in new directions 
socially. Put aside petty an- 
noyances and listen to intui- 
tion regarding projects now 
on the "drawing board." Be 
on top of new techniques as 
changes come about at work. 

TAURUS: (April 20 to May 

20 — Also Taurus Ascendant) 
— A short, relaxing trip would 
be beneficial to your mental 
attitude. Begin new projects 
now — you have the support of 
friends and groups. Good time 
to redecorate your home. Be 
patient if projects "bog 
down." 

GEMINI: (May 21 to June 
20 — Also Gemini Ascendant) 
—Stay in the spot-light, "cen- 
ter stage, front." Present 
projects to those with influ- 
ence. Stay open-minded to 
new ideas. A short trip could 
prove beneficial. Share your- 
self with brothers and sisters 

— family. 

CANCER: (June 21 to July 
22 — Also Cancer Ascendant) 

— You get another chance to 
improve public relations and 
marital affairs. Old friends 
may reenter the picture. 
Don't pretend to be someone 
you're not in romance — it 
could boomerang. Attend to 
correspondence. 

LEO: (July 23 to August 22 

EAT FIRST 

Shopping on a full stomach 
saves money according to the 
Council of California Growers 
— hungry shoppers are the 
big spenders while shoppers 
who eat before going to the 
store buy fewer food items. — 



— Also Leo Ascendant) — You 
are back "in the driver's 
seat" regarding work situ- 
ations. Be realistic — don't 
buy your own fantasies! Curb 
ambition so that you don't ag- 
gressively push a project in 
the face of strong opposition. 
Create harmony. 

VIRGO: (August 23 to Sept. 
22 —Also Virgo Ascendant) — 
Keep close relationships run- 
ning smoothly now. Curb sus- 
picion and indiscreet conduct. 
Finances should improve al- 
lowing you to pay all debts. 
Stick to budget and longterm 
plans. A social affair may be 
disappointing. 

LIBRA: (Sept. 23 to Oct. 22 

— Also Libra Ascendant) — 
Take especial care with diet. 
Be sure all food is fresh and 
pure. Investigate possible 
need for vitamin supple- 
ments. Keep healthy mental 

f attitudes. A friend in financial 
need should adopt more 
thrifty, careful habits. 

SCORPIO: (Oct. 23 to Nov. 
21 — Also Scorpio Ascendant) 

— Put the "finishing touches" 
on projects, being very care- 
ful with details. Resist ten- 
dency to be hypercritical — 
dwell on the positive aspects. 
Mend some "ragged" busi- 
ness relationships at a social 
affair. 

SAGITTARIUS: (Nov. 22 to 
Dec. 21 — Also Sagittarius As- 
cendant) — An important 
friendship could develop now 

— don't "rush" it. Use your 
own good judgment about 
property held jointly. Now is 



the time to lay important 
plans and foundations for fu- 
ture action in business. 

CAPRICORN: (Dec. 22 to 
Jan. 19 — Also Capricorn As- 
cendant) — Better not push 
the issue with your boss or su- 
perior who is "set in his 
ways." Work on projects al- 
ready in progress in a quiet, 
efficient way. Mate or partner 
may be edgy now — avoid 
temperamental outbursts. 

AQUARIUS: (Jan. 20 to 
Feb. 18 — Also Aquarius As- 
cendant) — Probable finan- 
cial gains. You geta "pay off" 
in gains and opportunities ac- 
cording to past efforts. Some- 
one suggests a new area of ac- 
tivity which is worthy of con- 
sideration. Curb stubbornness 

— stay adaptable. 

PISCES: (Feb. 19 to March 
20 — Also Pisces Ascendant) 

— Property interests are 
highlighted — opportunities to 
buy or sell. You attract situ- 
ations and people who are 
"lucky" for you. Later in the 
week resist schemes that are 
"too good to be true," because 
they are! 

EACH OF US IS UNIQUE. 
You can understand others 
only as well as you under- 
stand yourself. Astrology is a 
diagnostic tool to aid you in 
seeing these different-nesses. 
Our Home Study Course in 
Beginners Astrology is now 
available at low cost. For in- 
formation, write: Your Horo- 
scope Guide, Copley News 
Service, in care of this news- 
paper. 



'Sweet life' could cause pilot error 



Dr. Charles Harper has 
warned that stewardesses 
who ply airline pilots with 
Cokes, coffee and sweets 
could be putting lives in jeop- 
ardy. 



Whenever sugar is plentiful 
in the diet, he says, hypogly- 
cemia is an ever-present dan- 
ger, and could cause mental 
confusion, impaired vision 
and weakness. — CNS 



General Electrics 





20.8 CO. FT. NO-FROST 
REFRIGERATOR- FREEZER 
Only SO'/*" Wide, 66" High.. 

GIANT 696 CO. FT. FREEZER... 
BIGGEST AVAILABLE IN A 
TOP-FREEZER MODEL... 
HOLDS UP TO 243 POUNDS 
OF FROZEN FOOD 

FREE71 FEATURES: 

• Jet PrSMt ice compartment 

• Ice 'r Easy Service (or, add an 
Automatic Icemaker, available at 
extra coat) 

REFRIGERATOR FEATURES: 

• Adjustable Meat Pan-attaches 
to any Adjustable Cantilever Shelf 

• Generous door storage 

• Rolls out on Big Wheels 




HANCOCK 

TIRE & APPLIANCE CO. 

115 FRANKLIN ST. 
SOUTH QUINCY 472-1710 

Next To The AdamVBirthplace 



BRAINTREE 

TV & APPLIANCE CO. 

17 HANCOCK ST. 
BRAINTREE SQ. 843-4250 
[Open Fri. Eves Till 9i 



STRICTLY PERSONAL 

Girlish Mom widens 
communication gap 



By PAT and 

MARILYN DAVIS 

Copley News Service 

Dear Pat and Marilyn: 

How can I convince my 
mother to be a 'mother' and 
stop trying to be one of the 
girls? I am 15 and Mom says 
she is afraid we'll lose con- 
tact. 

The fact is that she is em- 
barrassing me. Mom has de- 
cided to wear teenage styles 
and learn all the latest 
dances. When my friends drop 
by after school, Mom is right 
in there joining the conversa- 
tion and all but popping her 
bubble gum. I want her to 
know my friends and I don't 
care how many times she 
comes in and out of the room, 
but I need a mother not an- 
other friend. 

I want to get the message 
across without hurting my 
mother. I have an honest rela- 
tionship with my parents and 
want to keep it that way. 

Barb 

Dear Barb: 

Inasmuch as you have a 
good understanding with your 
mother, why not tell her ex- 
actly how you feel? You may 
discover that she will be only 
too happy to know that dress- 
ing and acting like a teen real- 
ly isn't the way to relate to a 
young daughter. 

In other words, don't let the 
communication gap widen — 
build the bridge now. 

Dear Pat and Marilyn: 

My girlfriend and I are al- 
most the same height. That is, 
we were until these ridiculous 
platform shoes came into 
style. They not only make a 
woman's foot look deformed, 



they make my girl inches tall- 
er than I am. 

I've hinted that I prefer a 
normal shoe, but Carolyn has 
chosen to ignore my com- 
ments. What can I say now? 

Paul 

Dear Paul: 

Tell Carolyn to come down 
off her perch before you fly 
the coop ! This type of shoe not 
only adds inches to a woman's 
height, it is downright dan- 
gerous. 

Dear Pat and Marilyn: 

You are forever saying 
"parents are people." Well, 
teenagers are people too. I am 
17 and my mother has to know 
every move I make. If I re- 
ceive an invitation to a party, 
it is always opened. If some- 
one calls me on the telephone, 
she asks who it is. If she wants 
something which is in my 
purse, she rummages through 
it. 

I have nothing to hide, but I 
do want a little privacy. How 
can I get this idea cross to 
Mom? She feels she is doing 
nothing inconsiderate or 
wrong. 

Needs Privacy 

Dear Needs Privacy: 

Tell your mother exactly 
what you have told me. Most 
of us require a certain amount 
of privacy. No doubt, your 
mother feels it is her respon- 
sibility to know what is going 
on. Keep communication lines 
open but stress the fact that 
there must be mutual trust. 
You have the right to open 
your own mail and receive 
your own phone calls. Your 
mother has the right to know 
your friends and where you 
go. It's a two-way street. 



,M 6 



fQ*\ 



l**r" PLUMBER? 

PLUMBING 
HEATING 

Complete Bathroom Remodeling 
RALPH ). MAHER CORP. 

339 SOUTHERN ARTERY, QUINCY 
MASTER LIC. NO. 7596 





CARPETS at 

builderls prices 



you *» H 



General 

contract carpet center 

division of General Millwork & Lumber 



259 Willard St. 
Quincy 



Page 10 Quincy Sun Thursday, January 31 , 1974 

COIN BOX 

'94 dollar 
brings $110,000 



By GARY L. PALMER 

The dollar in general may 
be shrinking, but a specific 
one certainly is not. 

Not in their wildest dreams 
could the men who struck the 
first U.S. dollar coins back in 
1794 have guessed one of those 
pieces would bring $110,000 
less than 200 years later. 

But that is what happened 
recently at a Los Angeles coin 
auction where Ralph Andrews 
outbid all others for the rare 
dollar. 

It is the highest price ever 
paid for a U.S. coin, beating 
the $100,000 price paid for a 
1913 Liberty nickel just last 
year. 

Why this particular dollar 
should fetch such a high price 
is somewhat of a mystery, but 
as is often the case, when a 
numismatist wants something 
badly enough, money is no ob- 
ject. 

The coin purchased for 
$110,000 in Los Angeles was 
minted 10 years before the 
most discussed coin in Amer- 
ican numismatics — the 1804 
silver dollar, of which only 
eight original specimens are 

STAMPS 



known and seven termed "re- 
strikes." One of these re- 
strikes went for $80,000 last 
year at the same time the 1913 
nickel was sold. The same 
firm was the buyer. 

The 1794 dollar is known as 
the Flowing Hair Type and 
this particular design lasted 
only two years. It was the first 
year that was rare as only 
1,758 were minted. Of that 
number only about 80 are 
known to exist today, so its 
"rare" classification is cer- 
tainly deserved. Most of those 
80 dollars still around are in 
badly worn condition and the 
one Andrews bought is re- 
ported to be in excellent con- 
dition. It may even be the 
very first U.S. dollar off the 
coining presses, but that 
might be hard to prove since 
the majority of the 1,758 origi- 
nal dollars are no longer in 
existence. 

The same 1794 dollar was 
sold at a London auction in 
1964 for $10,000. Five years 
later it brought $13,000 and a 
short four years more saw the 
price soar astronomically. 
Nearly $100,000 more. 



U. N. plans new issue 



By LEA BLAUVELT 

The United Nations Postal 
Administration has added a 
new stamp to its building se- 
ries. Four recent releases 
sharing a common design de- 
picted the new International 
Labor Office (IL) headquar- 
ters building in Geneva, Swit- 
zerland. 

The stamps were of 10 and 
21-cents denomination for use 
at the U.N. headquarters in 
New York and of 60 and 80- 
Swiss centimes for use in Ge- 
neva. 

The corner stone of the new 
ILO building was laid in May 
1970, and it is scheduled for 
completion by mid-1974, pro- 
viding office space for some 
2,150 people. 

The ILO was created in 
1919, at the same time as the 
League of Nations. In 1946, it 
became the first specialized 

ACIOSS 

Cl. Lading 
6. Go away!: 

Rtlenx 
11. Bay window 
12. More bulky in 

Oftfure 
14. Due for ore 
IS. What Elia wu 
to Charles 
Lamb: 2 wds. 
10. Art humbly 
17. Biblical weedi 

19. Shepherded 

20. Reasonably to 
be expected 

22. No place for a 
"big fish" 

23. Fail to include 

24. Slight 
experience 

25. Intimidated 

28. Toxicant 

29. Hating let* 
color 



agency associated with the 
United Nations. Its first 50- 
years of service was crowned 
in 1969 with the award of the 
Nobel Peace Prize. 

The U.N. also plans to issue 
three new stamps March 22 to 
commemorate the centenary 
of the Universal Postal Union. 
Designed by Arne Johnson of 
Norway, the three will be 
printed in denominations of 
10-cents for U.N. use in New 
York and 30 and 60-Swiss cen- 
times for use in Geneva. 

More specific details are 
not yet available. 

Collectors desiring first day 
cancellations or direct mint 
stamp purchase should write, 
asking for instructions, to: 
U.N. Postal Adm., P.O. Box 
5900, Grand Central Sta., New 
York, NY 10017. 



so 



Sound of 

distress 
31. Son of Zeus 
82. —out, 

disregarded 

86. Donnybrook 
36. Homonym of 

"bored" 

87. "Take it on 
the — ," nee 

89. Celebrated 

41. PlanUife of a 
region 

48. Taints 

44. Bring to 
fruition 
They "turn 
freemen into 
■lares" 
Orerweight 



46 



46 

DOWN 

1. Search 
thoroughly 

2. Sprite in "The 
Tempest" 



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A Beetle, 
formerly 
Turn to the 
right 
Veteran: 
hyph. wd. 
Make 
obdurate 
Swindles i 
slang 
Shutout- 
spoiler 
Puzzled; 
perplexed : 
8 wds. 
Souvenir 
Nursery 
rhyme "Jack" 
Blush 
Corrosive 
Pierces with 
the tusks 
Home 
besutifler 
Moving alter- 
nately in oppo- 
site directions : 
8 wds. 

Used frugally 
Struck and 
rebounded 

27. Herringlike 
fish 

28. Utter 
profusely 
Protective 
ditches 
Strobiles 
"Go to Gretna 
Green" 
Accepts the 
hazard 
Ceintur* 
Shaggy neck 
hair 

Pen point 
Ad—, 
ex tempo rise 



6. 



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12. 

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22. 

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PHOTO-FUN 



Shadows create pictures 



By GILBERT MIX 

Shadows "draw" any 
photograph, monochrome or 
color, and become the basic 
structure of your picture. 

Thus the camera does the 
same thing as an artist start- 
ing with a white sheet of paper 
and a sketching pencil — cre- 
ates the picture with black 
lines. 

This is the reason the skilled 
photographer, whether ar- 
ranging his lights for a por- 
trait in a studio, or using the 
sun for a light source for a 
scene, soon becomes aware of 
the importance of the way the 
shadows are falling. 

Now, the problem becomes 
one of exposure. 

Obviously, the areas with 
the least light, the shadows, 
will require more exposure 
than the remainder of the pic- 
ture, if details in the shadows 
are to be preserved. 

Just how important is this 
shadow detail? Isn't it suffi- 
cient just to have those deep 
structural blacks in a mono- 
chrome, or deeper color in a 
color picture? That depends 
on what the photographer is 
trying to show. 

In a day when materials 
could never reveal the entire 
range of tones — and most 
photographic materials still 
can't do it under a bright sun 
— the rule of thumb was to 
"expose for the shadows and 
develop for the highlights." 

Thus film was given a rela- 
tively full exposure, then pro- 
cessed until the highlights of 
the picture were full of detail 
and just beginning to "block 
up," or become so opaque that 
a printing light wouldn't go 
through them. 

This had a tendency to 
flatten the picture, reduce 
contrast, and bring the range 
of tones on a film within the 
ability of photographic paper 
to reproduce them. 

Many modern techniques do 
just the opposite, and 




BIRD-SHOT -- This beautiful shot of a pair of pigeons illustrates the 
relative importance of shadow detail, and the modern trend of 
shooting for the highlights and allowing blacks go as dark as possible. 
In this case it is highly successful. 



photographers kid themselves 
into thinking that they have 
speeded up their favorite film 
— made it much more sensi- 
tive to light — by using some 
super-duper film developer, 
or by other darkroom 
manipulation like long film 
development. 

Any careful examination of 
such speeded up film will re- 
veal that the photographer 
simply has given up shadow 
detail, and even some middle 
tones in some cases, to save 
all possible detail in high- 
lights. 

There's nothing bad about 
the technique. Often it may 
produce superior results in 
certain types of photography. 
Those shadows are still there 
— but as hard black lines, 
which may add drama and 
punch to the highlight details 
which remain. 

But under-exposure of this 
type — and it is under-expo- 
sure even though a negative 
may appear dark — can cause 
real difficulties in color nega- 



tive printing because shadows 
may take on quite unpleasant 
colors (not black) in shadows 
— a blue, or purple, for in- 
stance under the jaw of a por- 
trait subject. 

When photographers under- 
stand that they have not 
changed the ASA rating of 
their film, as they believe, but 
have given up part of the lati- 
tude of their film for a par- 
ticular result, they become 
better photographers. Be- 
cause the time may come 
when they want that shadow 
detail — and they can get it 
with exposure below their 
usual "rating" of film speed. 

The apparent speeding up of 
film has been successful pri- 
marily because it has been 
used with film that tends to 
produce flat pictures, because 
it is "fast" in the first place to 
hold detail in badly lighted 
situations.. When only the 
highlights are developed, con- 
trast is better, particularly 
where shadow detail is unim- 
portant. 



WORLD OF MUSIC 

Nostalgia wave hits fifties 



By JUDY HUGG 

Now the nostalgia wave is 
sweeping into the fifties as 
someone suddenly discovered 
that 20 years have passed 
since the early years of that 
decade. In the grip of the look- 
back mood, MGM Records 
has dipped into the files and 
emerged with a series of al- 
bums dedicated to some of the 
top MGM musicals of two de- 
cades ago. 

The series — each is a two- 











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record, original sound track 
LP — includes "Kiss Me 
Kate," which premiered in 
New York's Radio City Music 
Hall in 1953; "The Band 
Wagon," which came out in 
the same year; "Rose Ma- 
rie," which premiered in 
1954; "Hit The Deck," which 
opened in New York and Los 
Angeles in 1950; "Show 
Boat," which premiered in 
1951; "Annie Get Your Gun," 
which debuted in 1950; 
"Singin" In The Rain," a 1952 
product; and "Three Little 
Words," 1950. Also in this 
group is the great "Easter 
Parade," by Irving Berlin, 
which was a big hit in 1948. 

This was an era when re- 
cording techniques already 
were fairly well advanced, 
and the sound on these LPs is 
excellent. 



PLATTER PARADE 
ALBUMS 

1. THE SINGLES, Carpen- 
ters (A&M) 

2. GOODBYE YELLOW 
BRICK ROAD, Elton John 
(MCA) 

3. YOU DON'T MESS 
AROUND WITH JIM, Jim 
Croce (ABC) 

4. JONATHAN LIVING- 
STON SEAGULL, Neil Dia- 
mond (Columbia) 

5. THE JOKER, Steve 
Miller Band (Capitol) 

HITBOUND SINGLES 

1. SPIDERS AND SNAKES, 
Jim Stafford (A&M) 

2. PAINTED LADIES, Ian 
Thomas (Janus) 

3. JUNGLE BOOGIE, Kook 
& The Gang (De-Lite) 

4. AMERICAN TUNE, Paul 
Simon (Columbia) 

5. IF WE MAKE IT 
THROUGH DECEMBER, 
Merle Haggard (Capitol) 



"Early Bird Fashions" will be 
presented by St. John's Junior 
League of Quincy Sunday, Feb. 
24, at the Sheraton-Tara, 
Braintree. 

Mrs. Carl Bersani is chairman 
of the annual fashion show and 
dinner. Proceeds will be used to 
benefit the Church Building 
Fund. 

A cocktail hour will be held 
from 6:30 p.m. to 7:30 p.m. 
with dinner and show following. 



St. John's Junior League 
To Present 'Early Bird Fashions' 



Thursday, January 31, !974Qutocy Sm*P*|c It 



• s 



"Ross of Quincy" will show 
spring and summer fashions. 
Hair styles will be by Russell 
Edwards of Quincy. Gifts and 
prizes donated by club members 
and friends will be awarded. 

Committee members are Mrs. 
Frederick Walsh, ticket 
chairman; Mrs. Richard Storella, 
program book chairman; and 
Mrs. Michael Priscella, raffle 
chairman. 



Models include Mrs. Richard 
Storella, Mrs. Frank Lomano, 
Mrs. James Bersani, Mrs. John 
Clodi, Mrs. Philip Savard, Mrs. 
John Morrison, Mrs. Theophilis 
McLelland, Mrs. Robert 
McCarthy, Mrs. Theodore 
Rouillard and Miss Kathleen 
Bersani. 

Mrs. Frederick Walsh, ticket 
chairman, announces tickets are 
still available. Deadline for 
reservations is Feb. 18. 



60 On Dean's List, Honor Roll At Aquinas 




Sister Dorothy Welch, 
President of Aquinas Junior 
College, Milton, announces 60 
students have attained Dean's 
List and Honor Roll status it the 
college. 

Seniors who have merited a 
grade-point average of 3.5 or 
above for Dean's List 
commendation are: 

Deborah Aimola, Lisa 
Dephouse, Janet Hill, Jean Sera, 
Gail Anderson, Michelle Curley, 
Mary Donovan, Ruth Johnson, 
Barbara Schwartz, Helen Allen, 
Patricia Kelliher, Lorraine 
Marsden, Ellen Bentley, 
Geraldine Groppi, Debra 
MacLeod, Deborah McNeice, 
Linda Morrissey, Karen Nolen, 
Margaret O'Donnell, Mary 
Peduzzi, Christine Rooney, 
Paula Ryan, Mary Sullivan, 
Michelle Canty, Mary Grant, 
Maryann Kelley, Gail Michel. 

One-year students who 
achieved Dean's List rating are 
Barbara Burke and Jean Kirwan. 

The following seniors are on 
the honor roll: 

Diet Workshop 

Program For 

Juniors 

Mrs. Edyce Binder of The 
Diet Workshop will be guest 
speaker Monday, Feb. 4, at a 
meeting of St. John's Junior 
League at 8:30 p.m. in the 
Rectory Hall, 21 Gay St., 
Quincy Center. 

She wilt present a slide film 
presentation entitled "A Four 
Letter Word for Love - Food". It 
shows how food is used to 
express love and turns the dull 
subject of nutrition into an 
amusing film story about two 
homemakers shopping, preparing 
and serving nutritious meals. 

Mrs. Anthony Aimola will 
preside. Hostesses for the 
evening will be Mrs. Frederick 
Walsh and Mrs. Leo Andronico. 

The next executive board 
meeting will be Feb. 12 at the 
home of Mrs. Albert Coletta 
with Mrs. John Clodi as 
co-hostess. 



WOODWARD'S 

EXPERT 

FRONT END 

WORK 

AND 

ALIGNMENT 

111 Mayor McGrath Highway 
Quincy, Mass. 

TELEPHONE: 773-1200 



Rita Bournelis, Denise Boyce, 
Mary Ann Brady, Vourneen 
Hayes, Nancy Macheras, 
Elizabeth McGann, Ann Marie 
Pena, Linda Kulbashian. 

Freshmen who have merited a 
grade-point average of 3.5 or 
above for Dean's List 
commendation are: 

Helene Bortolotti, Karen 
Sealund, Jacqueline Connell, 
Diane Coronite, Mary Jo 



Glennon, Susan O'Connell, 
Kathleen Shea, Rose Palhete, 
Ann Puopolo, Susan Tucker, 
Susan Hewitt, Diane Keegan. 

The following freshmen are 
on the honor roll: 

Helen Miceli, Claudia Peck, 
Susan Bianculli, Julia Burns, 
Nancy Curran, Wynne Garron, 
Jean Kelleher, Maryellen 
Kernan, Patricia McNulty, 
Sandra Pierce, Susan Teed. 



NEW CONSTITUENT - Representative and Mrs. Thomas F. 
Brownell of 15 Moreland Rd, Merrymount, get acquainted with their 
new son, David Thomas, bom Szn. 20 at St. Margaret's Hospital, 
Dorchester. Their second child, he weighed in at 10 pounds. 

Rep., Mrs. Thomas Brownell Parents 



State Representative and Mrs. 
Thomas F. Brownell of 15 
Moreland Rd, Quincy, are the 
parents of a son, David Thomas, , 
born Jan. 20 at St. Margaret's 
Hospital, Dorchester. 

Grandparents are Mr. and Mrs. 



John H. Brownell of 180 Rock 
Island Rd, Quincy and Mr. and 
Mrs. Frank L. Donovan of 16 
Gardner St., Peabody. 

Mr. and Mrs. Brownell have a 
daughter, Karen, 2. 




■ 
■ 
■ 
■ 
■ 
■ 



everybody who gets a government 
check through the mail 

Government Employees, 

Federal Retirees, Service Personnel, 

Disabled Veterans, 

Social Security Recipients 

If you look to the mail for your government check, we can offer you a thief-proof, 
time-saving way to do your banking. It's a banking plan that lets your check be sent 
directly from the government to your bank. Your check is automatically deposited 
in your account on the same day you'd normally receive youY check. We guarantee 
that your check will be credited to your account on that date, even though we may 
receive your check at a later date. No more checks stolen from your mailbox. No 
more time-consuming trips to the bank. It's a nice, easy, and. safe way to 
do your banking. 

If you're interested in our Government Check Banking Plan, please fill out the 
coupon and return it to us. We'll send you a Treasury Department form whjch, 
when completed and submitted by you to the agency that issues your check, will 
enable you to participate in our Government Check Banking Plan. Or, come in 
and ask us for a Treasury Department form (No. 1189). We'll show you how simple 
it is to protect your government allotments. 



Please send Treasury Department form (No. 1189) so I can participate in your 1 
Government Check Banking Plan. £ 

Name S 



Address. 
City___ 



State. 



Zip. 



■ 

I 
I 

□ I now have a checking account at the Hancock Bank. (No ) 1 

□ I now have a savings account at the Hancock Bank. (No. _) 

□ I am interested in opening a checking and/or savings account at the 
Hancock Bank. 8 

Mail back to: Government Check Banking Plan,' Hancock Bank and Trust Company I 
1495 Hancock Street, Quincy, MA 02169 1 



fLof vpU The Mone y Tree Bank 

fa HANCOCK BANK 

Main office in Quincy Center, with 14 branches south and west of Boston. 

Quincy 773-0500. Norwood 769-1300 „ c n . 

Member F D I C 



Page 12 Quincy Sun Thursday, January 31, 1974 
MONEY TALKS' 



Home Purchase 
Strengthens 

The Marriage 



By Philip J. 
Pr«i<tont 
COLONIAL FEDERAL SAVINGS 
And Loan AnocUrtion 
of Quincy and Hotoook 

•* WMkfeyi a-TiJO TlHirarfay* 




This is not the best time, in 
view of high interest rates and 
the scarcity of money for home 
loans, to talk about what buying 
a home does to a marriage. But a 
recent survey conducted among 
500 young couples provided 
such interesting insights that we 
decided to tell you about it. 

The basic finding of a 
mortgage insurance company 
study was that "the purchase of 
a home strengthened familial 
bonds-strengthened the 
marriage." In only 53 of the 500 
cases did the husband and wife 
report little or no change, and 
only eight marriages reported 
suffering adversely from the 
decision. 

The couples were picked at 
random from all parts of the 
country. They had been married 
18 months to 8 years. 
Forty-eight of the families had 
no children, 383 had one child, 
and 69 have two or more 
children. Annual incomes ranged 
from $10,000 to $22,500. 

Hie changes which occurred 
were not overnight matters but 
developed over a period of 
months. These were the 
developments reported by the 
men: 

• A firmer role as husband 
and father - an increased sense of 
masculinity. 

• A greater awareness of their 
responsibility for the family's 
well-being. 

• A strong determination to 
keep their property in the best 
condition possible. 

• A sense of achievement. 

• A greater feeling of 
independence. 

• A greater feeling of home 
orientation. 

• More community spirit and 
a greater desire to make new 
friends. 



The role of women in the 
home-buying process is strong, 
the survey discovered. Over 83 
per cent of the wives made the 
final decision, although all 
home-buying aspects were 
discussed by both sides of the 
family. Here is what home 
purchase meant for the women: 

• A more sharply defined role 
as wife and mother. 

• A sense of improved social 
status. 

• Greater need - and 
intention -- to "get involved" in 
church, school, and other 
community and civic affairs. 

• Increased desire to be a 
better housekeeper. 

• Better understanding of the 
family's financial situation. 

• Need for better planning of 
family time and activities. 

There was a consensus that 
life styles had changed and that 
these families now "belonged"; 
they had joined the 
Establishment. Marriage and 
family ties acquired richer and 
more permanent significance. 

A successful business man of 
our acquaintance, now in his 
70's, testified several years ago 
to similar results he and his wife 
experienced from their purchase 
of a home. It didn't come until 
they were in their late 30's, 
when he was employed in a job 
with no apparent future and his 
wife, who was childless, also 
worked. 

"We soon discovered we were 
people of property, capitalists," 
he said. "It changed all my 
thinking •- I left my job, started 
a small business and in time 
acquired two others." 

He doubts it would have 
turned out as it did if they 
hadn't bought the home. 



George Gay Wentworth Faculty Advisor 



George Gay of Wollaston has 
been named to serve as a faculty 
advisor for the second semester 
at Wentworth Institute in 
Boston, according to Dr. Edward 



T. Kirkpatrick, Wentworth 
president. 

A member of the Wentworth 
faculty, will serve as a section 
adviser. 




WOLLASTON 
CREDIT UNION 

PERSONAL & AUTO LOANS 
NO NOTICE SAVINGS ACCTS. 
EARN 5%% P":rt ANNUM. 



SPECIAL 
NOTICE 



60/ PER 
/O ANNUM 



REAL ESTATE-MORTGAGES 
HOME IMPROVEMENTS 

ALL ACCOUNTS FULLY INSURED 
UNDER LAW BY MASS.C.U. 
SHARE INSURANCE CORP. 

651 HANCOCK ST., 
WOLLASTON 

773-3500 773-8600 

OPEN MON.-THURS. 9-8 TUES., WED., FRI. 9-5 



ALLAN'S 

NOW AVAILABLE 
ALL THE LATEST SOUNDS 

on 
8 Track Tapes - Cassettes - LP's - 45's 

All at Allan's Discounted Prices 

also 

Country & Western & Easy Listening 

ALLAN'S TAPE & STEREO CENTER 

16 Beale St [Next to Wollaston Theatre] 

Wollaston, Mass. Tel: 472-9698 

Hours: 10 • 9 M oiu-Fri. 10 - 6 Sat 



WOLLASTON 




NEW SCHOOL COMMITTEEMAN John J. Sullivan and family are all smiles at impromtu celebration 
after taking his oath. From the left, are Mary rose, Mrs. Sullivan, Patricia, Mr. Sullivan, Barbara Sullivan 
Arnold and John J. Sullivan Jr., executive secretary to the Norfolk County Commissioners. 



LaLeche League 

To Meet 

On Feb. 5 

LaLeche League of Quincy 
will hold its first meeting of a 
four-part series Feb. 5, at 8 p.m., 
at the home of Mrs. Eugene 
Steeves, 91 Farrington St., 
Wollaston. 

The advantages of 
breastfeeding for the mother and 
baby will be discussed. 

Persons interested in learning 
more about breastfeeding are 
welcome, as are babies. 

LaLeche League is a 
non-profit, non-sectarian 
organization of women which 
gives advice and encouragement 
to women who wish to 
breastfeed their babies. The use 
of the free lending library at 
each meeting is encouraged. 




* FLAGS * 

INDOOR OUTDOOR 
ACCESSORIES 



FLAGS MADE TQ ORDER 

STATE FLAGS CHURCH FLAGS 

FLAGS OF ALL NATIONS 

EAGLE FLAG 
CO.,INC. 

147 Beach St., 472-8242 
Wollaston, Mass. 02170 



Stationery 
and 




Big Pens 

Flair Pens 

Pencils 

Crayons 

Erasers 

Rulers 

Paints 



Birthday Candles 
Playing Cards 
Carbon Paper 
Stencils 
Index Cards 
Scotch Tape 
Elmers Glue 
Steno. Notebooks 
Note Book Paper 

WOLLASTON 

MUSIC CENTER 

AND HOBBY SHOP 

27 Beale St. Wollaston 
Call 773-6325 



Airman Edward Spencer 
At Sheppard AFB 



Airman Edward V. Spencer 
Jr., son of Mrs. Jean Spencer of 
10 Chapman St., Wollaston, has 
been assigned to Sheppard AFB, 
Tex., after completing Air Force 
basic training. 

During his six weeks at the 
Air Training Command's 
Lackland AFB, Tex., he studied 
the Air Force mission, 
organization and customs and 
received special instruction in 
human relations. 

He has been assigned to the 
Technical Training Center at 
Sheppard for specialized training 
as a medical helper. 

Spencer is a 1971 graduate of 
Dorchester High School. His 
father, Edward V. Spencer Sr., 




lives at 
Dorchester 



EDWARD SPENCER 

67 Nelson St. 



Richard Nikander 
Completes A.F. Training 



Airman Richard P. Nikander, 
son of Mrs. Patricia A. Nikander 
of 59 Adams St., Quincy, has 
completed Air Force basic 
training at Lackland AFB, Tex. 
During his six weeks training, 



MUSIC LESSONS 

Professional Instruction 
DRUM PIANO GUITAR 
BRASS REEDS 
WOLLASTON MUSIC CENTER^ 
27 Beale St.. Wollaston 
Call 773-5325 



Nikander studied the Air Force 
mission, organization and 
customs and received special 
instruction in human relations. 

The airman is remaining at the 
Air Training Command base for 
specialized training in the 
security police field. 

Nikander attended Quincy 
High School. His father, Richard 
P. Nikander Sr., lives at 114 
Willard St., Quincy. 



WOLLASTON 



Beak St. off Hancock St 
QUINCY PR 3 1600 



WED. 1 - 30 THRU TUES. 2 



SOUTH SHORE ^ 
SEWING MACHINE CO 

We Service All Makes Sewing 
Machines and Vacuum Cleaners 
665A Hancock St., Wollaston 
471-5982 



THE OTHER 

A HORROR TALE 
[P.G.] 7:30 P.M. 

PAPER 
CHASE 

WITH TIMOTHY BOTTOMS 
[P-GJ 9:15 P.M. 



NEWSBOYS WANTED 
Here's a chance to earn extra 
money by building a Quincy 
Sun home delivery route. 

Telephone: 471-3100 



$100 ADMISSION AT 
ALL PERFORMANCES 






Florist 



OPEN ^ 

SUNDAYS «§£ 

I PEARL- JLm 




PEA 

_/donahue 
DELIVE R mary 

— — * TANTILLO 

679 HANCOCK ST. 

WO LLASTON 



«S5 



$ 



Thursday, January 31 , 1974 Quincy Sun Page 13 



Special Audio-Visual On 
City's History Available 



"From Yesterday to 
Tomorrow in Quincy" is the 
title of an audio-visual 
production which has just been 
completed by the Historic 
District Study Committee and 
the city's Department of 
Planning and Community 
Development. 

Designed to portray the city's 
vast historic resources and the 
need to protect them from 
deterioration and abuse, the 
slide show with sound, indicates 
how two areas deserve to be set 
aside as Historic Districts. 

Produced for the city by 
Joseph A. Donahue Associates, 
Quincy, architectural firm, the 
program is narrated by 
newscaster Winslow Bettinson of 
radio station WJDA. Depicting 
how future development in the 
city can complement the 
architecture of the past, the 
show offers many scenes out of 
Quincy's past history including: 

The Greenleaf Building at 
Granite and Hancock Sts. as it 
appeared 80 years ago, the early 
days of the Adams and Central 
Buildings, the old fountain when 
it was near the United First 
Parish Church as well as other 
early pictures of City Hall and 
the Granite quarries. 

The Historic District Study 
Committee is making the 
program available to local clubs 
and organizations. 

"We want as many people as 
possible in the city to see the 
story of 'From Yesterday to 
Tomorrow in Quincy' said 
Mayor Walter J. Hannon. "It 
makes me very proud to realize 
the extent of our city's great 
heritage." 

Thayer Sets 
SSA T Dates 

The Secondary School 
Admission Test [SSAT] for 
students interested in applying 
to Thayer Academy will be given 
at the Academy on Saturday 
mornings, March 9, and May 1 1. 

The closing date for 
registration with the Educational 
Testing Service at Princeton, 
N.J. for the March 9th test is 
Feb. 15. 

Students may obtain 
registration forms for these tests 
and information concerning 
admission by telephoning 
Thayer Academy. ' Those 
interested in admission to grade 
9 should contact the 
headmaster's office. Those 
interested in admission to grades 
10-12 should contact the 
assistant headmaster's office. 

Scholarships are available for 
those who qualify. Those 
interested should contact the 
Assistant Headmaster's office for 
details. 



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UP TO $10,000 

PER YEAR AS A TRACTOR 
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Although the program 
presents the history of the entire 
City of Quincy, it focuses on 
two areas which have been 
chosen as Historic Districts, an 
area surrounding the Adams 
Birthplaces and the central area 
of Quincy from the South Shore 
National Bank tower to the 
Adams National Historic Site on 
Adams St. 

"The Historic District Study 
Committee has been working on 
this major project since Spring," 
noted Geoffrey A. Davidson of 
the Department of Planning and 
Community Development. "By 
blending the past with 
appropriate future development, 
the richness of the city will be 
enhanced." 

Serving on the Historic 
District Study Committee are 
Rev. John R. Graham chairman; 
Robert A. Cerasoli, secretary; H. 
Hobart Holly, William A. 
O'Connell, Kenneth A. Parry, 
ALA; Miss Dorothy Osbourne 
and Miss Joanne Pelton. Staff 
coordinator for the Department 
of Planning and Community 
Development is Miss Mary E. 
Weafer, who is coordinating the 
bookings for the program. 




HONORED « Rev. and Mrs. Chester A. Porteus were honored by parishioners and friends Sunday at a 
vesper service and reception at Christ Episcopal Church. With them is Thomas Whitworth, committee 
chairman. Rev. Porteus retired last month after nearly 30 years as rector at Christ Church. He and Mrs. 
Porteus are now living in Braintree. 

[Quincy Sun Photo by Laban H. Whittaker] 

VFW Scholarship Winners To Be Honored 



State and district winners of 
the 27th annual Veterans of 
Foreign Wars "Voice of 
Democracy Scholarship 



Program" will be honored 
Saturday at a banquet in the 
George F. Bryan Post hall. 
The state champion, who will 



represent Massachusetts in the 
national contest, is Laura 
Tromontozzi of Brighton. 



Save this chart 
ft can help you save electricity. 



The need to use electricity wisely is 
more urgent than ever— particularly 
during peak load periods from 4 p.m. 
to 7 p.m. in winter and 11 a.m. to 4 p.m. 
in summer months. 

To help you evaluate your own 
usage and establish some household 



priorities, we've prepared the follow- 
ing table of estimated consumption 
and costs for an average household 
over a 2-month billing period. 

Keep in mind that these are 
average figures and you may use some 
of your appliances more or less fre- 
quently. Remember, too, that there 
are many ways to conserve electricity 



and the savings you make can make 
a difference. 



MASSACHUSETTS 
ELECTRIC 




&& 



6S2S 



ESS3 £&3 SQ9 map 



Average Household Appliance Usage and Costs 
For A Typical Two-Month Billing Period 



V 



I 



I 



Hem 

Food Preparation 


Estimated 

kilowatt hour 
usage in 
2 months 


Estimated 

cost for 

2 months' use 


Item 


Estimated 

kilowatt hour 

usage in 

2 months 


Estimated 

cost for 

2months use 


Blender 
Broiler 

Carving knife 
Coffee maker 
Deep fryer 
Dishwasher 
Frying pan 

Food Preservation 


2.5 
16.7 

1.3 
17.7 
13.8 
60.5 
31.0 


$ .09 
.60 
.05 
.60 
.50 
2.18 
1.12 


Hot plate 

Mixer 

Oven, self cleaning 

Range 

Roaster 

Toaster 

Waste Disposer 


15.0 

2.2 

191.0 

195.8 

34.2 

5.5 

5.0 


$ .54 

.08 

6.88 

7.05 

1.23 

.20 

.18 


15cu. ft. Freezer 

frostless 
12 cu. ft. Refrigerator 

frostless 

Laundry 


199.2 
293.5 
121.3 
202.8 


$ 7.17 
10.57 
4.37 
7.30 


14 cu. ft. 

Refrigerator/Freezer 
frostless 


189.5 
304.8 


$ 6.82 
10.97 


Clothes dryer 
Iron (hand) 

Comfort & Health 


165.5 
24.0 


$ 5.96 
.86 


Washing machine 

(automatic) 
Water heater 


17.1 
870.0 


$ .62 
13.22 


Air conditioner (room) 

Dehumidifier 

Fan (attic) 

Fan (circulating) 

Fan (window) 

Home Entertainment 


231.5 

62.8 

48.5 

7.2 

28.3 


$ 8:33 

2.26 

1.75 

.26 

1.02 


Hairdryer 

Humidifier 

Shaver 

Lights (Equivalent of five 

150 watt bulbs burning 

5 hours a day) 


2.3 
27.2 
.3 

225.0 


$ .08 
.98 
.01 

8.10 


Radio 
Radio/phono 

Housewares 


143 
18.2 


$ .51 
.66 


Television (b & w) 
Television (color) 


60.3 
83.7 


$ 2.17 
3.01 


Clock 

Sewing machine 


2.8 
1.8 


$ .10 
.06 


Vacuum cleaner 


7.7 


$ .28 I 










I 




Page 14 Quincy Sun Thursday, January 31, 1974 



Young Ideas 

Unedited selections from the writings 
of Quincy's elementary school children. 



OUR FIRST FIELD TRIP 

On our field trip we went to 
West Quincy. Mr. Crowley 
talked all about the granite rock. 
Then we all had to find our own 
rock that was called the granite. 
After we found our own rock we 
went back down the hill. When 
we got back down the hill we 
saw the first railroad track in 
Ouincy. We were talking about 
that they should clean up the 
place becuase all there is is 
poison ivy and all kinds of weeds 
and stuff. Then we walked down 
the railroad track. Then we went 
somewhere else called Rocky 
Mountain. We had to climb up a 
big hill. Then we had to walk 
down another hill. Then Mr. 
Crowley talked all about another 
rock called lava. Then we had to 
find one of our own. It was 
greenish color. Then we went 
home. 

Justine Notarangelo 

Snug Harbor School 

Grade 5 

MR. SWEENEY 

Mr. Sweeney came in to our 
class. He told us about the 
insurane-mans. 

Tara Dillon 

Wollaston School 

Grade 2 - 3 

SAFETY OFFICER 

Safety Officer Pettinelli came 
to our classroom. He told us 
about safety. And Miss Barbara 
DiNatale came in too. 

Tara Dillon 

Wollaston School 

Grade 2-3 

THE POST OFFICE 

We went to the Post Office. 
We saw how they put on the 
mark on the letters we had a 
nice time. I hope we go again. 

John Ramsden 

Wollaston School 

Grade 2 - 3 

FIRE STATION 

We went to the fire station we 
saw hoses, ax, pumper truck, 
hat. I put one on we had lots of 
fun we liked it. I like it to. They 
went for a drill. 

John Ramsden 

Wollaston School 

Grade 2 - 3 



I LIKE WINTER 

I like winter because it snows 
in the winter. You can go ice 
skating and sledding and have a 
snowball fight with your friends. 
Winter is my favorite season of 
the year because I like to watch 
hockey games on television and I 
like to play hockey with my 
friends. There is one thing that I 
don't like about winter. You can 
not ride your bike in the winter. 
The best thing I like about 
winter is (hat Christmas comes 
and you get lots of presints. 

Patrick Greenan 

Atherton Hough School 

Grade 4 

THE BOY WHO HATED TOYS 

There was a boy who hated 
toys and when Christmas came 
he opened his package and threw 
his toys away. The only thing he 
liked best was his old ripped 
teddy bear. He hated new toys. 
When he was small, his mother 
bought him new toys and he got 
so used to them when his 
mother bought him a new toy he 
wouldn't use them. Every year 
the boy's new toys were given to 
his brothers and sisters and he 
played with his old toys. 

Jeff Keefe 

Atherton Hough School 

Grade 4 

THE THUNDERSTORM 

The clouds move in the sky as 
they turn darker and darker. 
Suddenly the Sun looks as if it 
falls from the sky as it sets 
behind the clouds. The waves 
swish against the rocks. And 
then all at once thunder crashes 
and echoes in the sky. Then a 
big stroke of lightning flashes in 
the sky as the rain starts to clear 
up. Then the rain sprinkles very 
little and finally it stops. Puddles 
are all around. There's no one 
around and there isn't a sound. 
Catherine Howard 
Snug Harbor School 
Grade 5 

STRANGERS 

Officer DiNatole told use not 
to talk to strangers. And never 
to go near refrigeraters. She also 
told us never to take candy from 
strangers. 

Mark Dunlea 

Wollaston School 

Grade 2 - 3 




UNOFFICIAL GUBERNATORIAL candidate, Atty. Gen. Robert H. Quinn [second left] during Quincy 
visit chats with Dist. Atty. George G. Burke, Richard J. Koch, executive secretary Quincy 
Park-Recreation Board and Atty. Richard W. Barry. The latter is expected to be Quinn's Quincy 
campaign coordinator when the latter makes his official announcement probably sometime in March. 

80- Year Old Artist's Exhibit At N.Q. Library 



Eighty-year old Gideon Cohen 
of Arlington will exhibit his 
paintings and drawings at the 
North Quincy Branch of the 
Thomas Crane Public Library 
through Feb. 

He was born in England in 
1894 and moved to 
Saskachewan, Canada at the age 
of 20. Since 1923 he has lived in 
Arlington. A sort of male 
Grandma Moses, Cohen is a 
self-taught artist who began 
drawing at the age of 70 after 
retiring from the fur business. 

Some of his works are 
pictures of familiar and historic 



points of interest. He has 
painted the gardens at the 
Arlington Town Hall; the First 
Baptist Church of Arlington, 
now hanging at the Ballin 
Branch Library; Dunster House 
in Harvard Square; and the 
House of Seven Gables at Salem. 
Four pictures of Harvard are 
now in the documents 
department at Harvard's Lamont 
Library. 

Cohen has earned recognition 
for his work. He won a second 
prize for a triptch of the interior 
of the Gardner Museum, and 
two years ago he won the Mina 
Pintner Prize, both from the 



Cambridge Art Association. 
Besides the Cambridge Group he 
is also a member of the 
Arlington and Lexington Art 
Associations. To date he has 
won 1 5 awards. 

A man of small stature who 
walks with a quick step, he 
generally uses public 
transportation to get his 
paintings to distant points for 
showing. However friends help 
when he has many pictures to 
transport. He sketches and 
works on his painfings out of 
doors, and in all kinds of 
weather, finishing them at home. 



Davis Succeeds Raymondi On Park Board 



School Committeeman Harold 
R. Davis has been appointed to 
the Quincy Park-Recreation 
Board by Mayor Walter J. 
Hannon for a two-year term. 

Davis succeeds school 
committeeman Daniel 
Raymondi on the board. 

In making the appointment, 
Mayor Hannon cited Davis' 
interest in expanding 
recreational opportunities by 
more' fully utilizing the School 
Department's facilities. 



In particular, he noted, Davis 
and other members of the 
School Committee approved a 
reduction of fees charged Youth 
Groups for the use of school 
gymnasiums in order to 
encourage the expansion of such 
activities. Davis, while a student, 
had also worked for * three 
summers as a Recreation 
Instructor. 

Davis is a graduate of 
Bowdoin College and 
Georgetown University Law 



Center. He is employed as the 
Economic Development Manager 
for the South Shore Chamber of 
Commerce. He was elected to 
the Quincy School Committee in 
1971 at the age of 27. 

"I know that Harold Davis 
will perform well for the citizens 
of Quincy as a member of the 
Park-Receation Board," Hannon 
said. "He has already shown an 
interest in expanding 
recreational activities in the 
city." 



Charles Ross To Be Commanders Club Chairman 



The Quincy Veterans Council 
Past Commanders Club will 



■ 



IANK 



install officers for 1974-75 in 
ceremonies April 19 at the 
South Weymouth Naval Air 
Station Officers Club. 

Charles N. Ross will succeed 
Louis S. Cassani as chairman. 

Other new officers will 
include: Lawrence J. Perette, 
vice chairman; Allen Kofman^ 



adjutant; Thomas B. McDonald, 
assistant adjutant; Peter Stonis, 
treasurer; Paul W. O'Neill, public 
relations. 

Incoming members of the 
executive committee are Arthur 
J. Perette, Louis S. Cassani, 
Thomas B. Hanrahan and Arthur 
I. Senter. 



David McW alter On Patrol Duty 



ll 



jigpvoMfa 



tf 33 "" 



9 



~i 



■ 






'Coast Guard Seaman David B 
McWalter, son of Mr. and Mrs 
Harry P. McWalter of 738 Sea 
St., Quincy, is on Atlantic 
fisheries patrol off the New 



RISING. 



Our building is going up... our m «nt| l^"/\ 

interest is already there. Open VJlill M M l\~ » 
an account at either office today. / jujjf 

Toir^ct /f co-operative _, 

DAILY 9-3, FRIDAY 9-5:30 479-6040/ /*" ^ ^ Gl ^-> 

100 GRANITE ST., DOWNTOWN 
DAILY 11-6, FRIDAY 11-8 SATURDAY 10-2 



CBajfk 



UlisterSUB 

64 Billings Rd 
North Quincy 479-9685 
Opposite I ash ion QuarHy Cleaner* 
Joseph Buccini 
WHY BOTHER 

COOKING TODAY 
ENJOY A DELICIOUS 
HOT OR COLD 
SUBMARINE, SANDWICH 
TRY OUR 

EGGPLANT 
PARMIGIANA 



OPEN MON. TO SAT. 

10 A.M. TO 1 1 P.M. 

SUNDAY j P.M. TO 9 P.M. 



England coast aboard the Coast 
Guard Cutter Sherman 
homeported here. 

Sixteen nations have signed 
agreements to protect Northwest 
Atlantic Fish species. McWalter 
is helping enforce the provisions 
of the various pacts. 



*n 



WE CAN HELP 

YOU MAKE THE 

RIGHT DECISION 

WHEN BUYING OR 

SELLING A HOME 



t 



i 





SOUTH SHORE CHAMBER presents Norfolk County Tourist and 
Development Council with real estate inventory. From left are, 
John Nourse, Executive Director Norfolk County Tourist and 
Development Council; Thomas Osterland, Interactive Sciences; 
George Reardon, Chamber's First Vice-President; Edward Owens, 
President Norfolk County Tourist and Development Council; Karen 
Gustin, chamber staff. 

Fountaine President 
Sacred Heart CYO 



The Sacred Heart Youth 
Organization of North Quincy 
held its election of officers 
recently at the Sacred Heart 
School Hall. Elected were: 
Steven Fountaine, president; 
Joseph Gill, vice president; 
Susan Koch, secretary; and 
Rosemary Murphy, treasurer. 

Anne Dolan was elected 
Youth Representative of the 
Sacred Heart Church Parish 
Council. Rt. Rev. Richard J. 
Hawko announced the 
appointment of Rev. James 
Hawker as the Spiritual Advisor 
of the organization. 

The Sacred Heart Youth 
Organization will conduct a cake 
sale Saturday and Sunday Feb. 



2-3 following the weekend 
masses. Proceeds will be used to 
take children from one of the 
orphanages to a performance of 
the Ice Follies in the Boston 
Garden during February. 

Mrs. Kathy Chetwynd has 
baked several novelty cakes for 
the sale, and they will be 
available for purchase. 

The cake sale will be held at 
the Sacred Heart School 
cafeteria, Hancock St., and 
Glover Ave., following the 4 and 
7 p.m. masses on Saturday, and 
the 9:15 and 10:45 a.m., noon, 
and 5 p.m. masses on Sunday. 

The committee includes the 
officers, Donna Panto, Debbie 
Panto, Alice Welch and Patricia 
Batts. 



Montclair Senior Citizens To Meet Feb. 4 



Montclair Senior Citizens will 
meet Monday Feb. 4 at the 
Montclair Men's Club, Holbrook 
Rd. 

Refreshments will be served at 



12:30 p.m. 

Mrs. Rena Howard will 
preside at the business meeting. 

The club will hold a card 
party Feb. 1 1 at 1 p.m. at the 
Montclair Men's Club. 



Frederick Farrell Re-appointed Notary 

Frederick L. Farrell of 16 meeting of the Executive 

Small St., Montclair has been Council following submission of 

reappointed as a Notary Public the name by Governor Francis 

announces State Secretary John W. Sargent. 

F. X. Davoren. The term will expire in seven 

Henry Bradley Re-appointed Notary 



Henry P. Bradley of 20 Small 
St., Montclair, has been 
reappointed as a Notary Public 
announces State Secretary John 
F. X. Davoren. 

Confirmation was made at a 



meeting of the Executive 
Council following submission of 
the name by Governor Francis 
W. Sargent. 

The term will expire in seven 
years. 



t"'J 



EVERY FRI. 
12 NOON TO 4 P.M. 

WALSH'S 

SEAFOOD 
LUNCHEONBUFFf! 

Featuring: 
THE 12 TO 4 COCKTAIL 



Buffet Served From 
12 to 4 Every Friday 

* Walsh's Famous Clam Chowder 

* Salads * Assorted Seafoods 
Featuring Sherried Seafood 

* Assorted Hot and Cold Dishes 

* Vegetables - Potatoes • Dessert 

* Cheeses - Coffee or Tea 

All this for only $3.00 



WALSH'S 
RESTAURANT 



g RULINGS RD NORTH QUINCY 773-5508 




•mmm*ffm** 



Thursday, January 3 1 , 1974 Quincy Sun Page 1 5 



mimtm 



NORTH QUINCY 



Served Free For 31 Years 



Joseph Lydon Succeeds 
William Mitchell On Park Board 



William J. Mitchell of 3 
Clement Terrace, North Quincy, 
has submitted his resignation as 
a member of the Quincy 
Park-Recreation Board, and 
Mayor Walter J. Hannon has 
appointed Joseph M. Lydon of 
215 Parke Ave., Squantum to fill 
the vacancy. 

Mr. Mitchell had completed 
31 consecutive years of service 
to the City of Quincy as a 
member of the former Park 
Board, Recreation Commission, 
and present Park-Recreation 
Board. 

He had started his 32nd year 
when he decided to relinquish 
his membership on the board, to 
a younger and more active man, 
as stated in his letter to Mayor 
Hannon. 

Mr. Mitchell, now 
80-years-old was first appointed 
in 1943 by the mayor Charles A. 
Ross to the former Park Board. 
He was appointed to the 
Recreation Commission when it 
was established in 1948, and was 
retained as a member of the 



merged Park and Recreation 
Board June 1, 1962, and has 
annually been reappointed. 

He has the longest consecutive 
service on the unpaid boards and 
commission, serving six mayors, 
Ross, Thomas S. Burgin, David 
S. Mcintosh, Amelio Delia 
Chiesa, James R. Mclntyre, and 
Hannon. 

Mr. Mitchell and the late J. 
Ernest Collins were both 
appointed to the Park Board in 
1943 by Mayor Ross, and 
although Mr. Collins served until 
his death in 1971, for a 33 year 
span, Mr. Collins resigned the 
board for several years, making 
Mr. Mitchell's 31 years the 
longest consecutive tenure on an 
unpaid board or commission. 

Mayor Hannon visited with 
Mr. Mitchell and his wife 
Monday presenting a placque 
"on behalf of the people of 
Quincy and himself, in gratitude 
for unselfish and devoted service 
to the city." 

Mr. Lydon's appointment to 
the Park-Recreation Board, for 
the first time in the history of 



Quincy, results in a board with a 
representative from each of the 
six wards in the city. 

Mr. Lyddh, a resident of 
Squantum since 1948, is married 
to the former Bernice Dorion, 
and the father of two sons. 
Serving in the armed forces 
overseas from 1940-1945, he is 
presently employed as assistant- 
superintendent for the 
Commonwealth of 
Massachusetts at 1 00 Nashua St., 
Boston. 

He is president of Greater 
Boston Council 45, American 
Federation State County and 
Municipal Employees 
AFL-CIO, past president Local 
370, Health and Hospital 
Department. He is a member of 
the American Legion and 
Democratic City Committee, 
and secretary of the Ward Six 
Democratic committee. Former 
president of the City of Boston 
Hospital Security Association, 
past president of South Boston 
Athletic Association, and a 
member of the Elks. 



Women's Physical Fitness Program At Atlantic 



The Quincy Recreation 
Department's Physical Fitness 
program for women is held 
Tuesday evenings, from 7 p.m. 
until 10 p.m. at Atlantic Junior 
High School, Hollis Ave., North 
Quincy. 

Recreation Director William 
F. Ryan said the 25-week 
program will continue through 
the winter and will offer a 
graduated schedule of 
calisthenics, volleyball, use of 



gymnastic equipment, and 
exercises to music. The program 
is directed by Mrs. Sarah 
Cobban. 

The program is open to 
Quincy residents beyond high 
school age through 65. 
Participants are urged to wear 
sneakers and proper gymnasium 
attire. There will be no 
pre-registration for this free 
program as registration will be 
taken at every session. 



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Page 16 Quincy Sun Thursday, January 31, 1974 



Christmas Parade Awards To Be 
Presented, Film Viewed Feb. 6 



^UUVW >^VW W> ^MWMW» > »^^^^^^^^^^^^^ 



*"»*%< 



A film of Quincy's Christmas 
Festival Parade will highlight the 
annual festival awards night 
Wednesday, Feb. 6, at Sons of 
Italy Hall, West Quincy. 

The film of the parade of 
floats and marching bands was 
made by Mark Erickson of 20 
Bunker Hill Lane, a student at 
Suffolk University. 

The awards and the winners 



are: 

Grand Prize, Father Thomas 
Tierney Trophy: South Shore 
Camp fire Girls. 

YOUTH DIVISION 

First Prize: Quincy High 
School band. 

Second Prize: St. John's CYO. 

Third Prize: St. Joseph's 
CYO. 

Fourth Prize: Milton Rainbow 
Girls. 



Call 



ADULT DIVISION 

First Prize: Curtain 

Theater. 

Second Prize: Braintree 

Legion Post 86. 

Third Prize: Weymouth 
Jaycees. 

Fourth Prize: Quincy Student 

Nurses. 

Mayor's Trophy: Supporters 
of Survival. 

Commercial Award: Burger 

King. 



Harlan Paine Visiting Nurse Assn. President 



Harlan L. Paine, Jr., director 
of Quincy City Hospital, was 
re-elected president of the 
Quincy Visiting Nurse 
Association at its 42nd annual 
meeting held recently at Walsh's 
Restaurant, North Quincy. 

Also re-elected were: 

Mr. Moses Karp, vice 
president; Miss Kathryn 
Wellington, secretary and Miss 



Sarah T. Couch, treasurer. 

Re-elected to the Board of 
Directors for a three-year term 
were: Atty. William E. Hickey, 
Paul E. Hurley, Mrs. Munroe 
MacLean, Mrs. John D. Smith 
and Dr. Eugene Suzedell. 

Paul Shapter Jr., Joint 
Business Manager for five South 
Shore Visiting Nurse 
Associations, Cbhasset, 



Hingham, Weymouth, Holbrook 
and Quincy, was the speaker. 
Shapter spoke on the need to 
streamline and standardize 
Administrative practices and 
procedures in Visiting Nurse 
Associations. He also supported 
the idea of a consolidation of 
certain business functions 
common to all Visiting Nurse 
Associations on the South Shore 
area. 



Free Well Baby Clinic At Southwest Center 



A free Well Baby Clinic will 
be held at the Southwest 
Community Center, 372 Granite 
St., Monday, Feb. 4. 

The Clinic is held on the first 
Monday of each month from 10 
a.m. to 11 a.m. through the 



cooperation of the Quincy 
Public Health Department. The 
clinic is available for children 
from when they are two months 
old until they start school. 

The services provided by the 
clinic are a complete 



immunization program, the child 
is weighed and measured, diets 
and vitamins are supplied, advice 
is offered. Questions will be 
answered by the physician who 
sees the child on each visit. The 
immunization program is 
administered by the physician. 



Francis Hickey Completes Air Force Training 



Airman Francis J. Hickey, son 
of Mr. and Mrs. Francis W. 
Hickey of 20 Goddard St., 



Quincy, has been assigned to 
Keesler AFB, Miss., after 
completing Air Force basic 



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During his six weeks at the 
Air Training Command's 
Lackland AFB, Tex., he studied 
the Air Force mission, 
organization and customs and 
received special instruction in 
human relations. 

The airman has been assigned 
to the Technical Training Center 
at Keesler for specialized 
training in 

communications-electronics 
systems. He is a 1972 graduate 
of Quincy High School. 





NEWSCARRIER OF THE MONTH Stephen Petrlllo, 15, 22 
Quarterdeck Rd, Germantown delivers Quincy Sun to his next 
door neighbor Mrs. Agnes Lee. Steve more than doubled the 
number of his customers in just two days by knocking on 
people's doors. 

[Quincy Sun Photo by Laban Whittaker) 

'Sun Carrier Of Month 9 

Steve Petrillo Adds 41 
Customers In 2 Days 



By STEVE FERRARA 

Stephen Petrillo of 22 
Quarterdeck Rd, 
Germantown, is the Quincy 
Sun's "Newscarrier of the 
Month" for January because 
of his enterprise and 
determination in building his 
route. 

Steve, who is 15, has his 
route up to 68 customers by 
knocking on doors in the 
Oceanview senior citizens 
apartments in Germantown. 
He had 27 customers. 

"I just went from door to 
door and talked to the 
people," he says. 

Steve, who is a 10th grader 
at Quincy High School, 
belongs to the Rifle Club. He 



also earns extra money to 
help his three brothers and 
mother by shoveling snow 
and fixing people's cars in his 
neighborhood. 

Despite all the time he 
spends working and going to 
school, Steve manages to find 
the time, just to be a nice kid, 
too. 

When he heard that the 
Snug Harbor elementary 
school would not have a 
Christmas party this year 
because they needed a Santa 
Claus, he volunteered to play 
the part, and according to 
reports he did a fine job in 
entertaining the students. 

Congratulations to Stephen 
Petrillo. v 



Civil Service Applications 
For Fire Dept., Health Posts 



State Civil Service is receiving 
MSSfef 'mechanic in the Quincy 
Fire Department and public 
health administrator in the 
Quincy Health Department. 

The master mechanic's job, 
which pays $ 1 7,5 1 2 a year, calls 
for at least five years full-time 
paid experience in repair of 
motor vehicles of which one 
year must have been in a 



supervisory caj>a,qijy - -at imn 
administrator's position, paying 
at least $15,582 a year, requires 
that the applicant have five years 
of full-time paid experience as 
administrator or assistant in a 
recognized public health agency. 

Applications must be received 
at the Civil Service office no 
later than Monday, March 1 1 . 



Quincy Girls Abp. Williams 
CYO Speech Contest Winners 



Fifteen students from 
Archbishop Williams High 
School Oratory Club 
participated in a recent regional 
speech competition at Silver 
Lake, Kingston. 

Nineteen schools from around 
the state entered over 250 
students in the three-round 
meet. Competitive forms of 
speech included interpretations 
of play reading, prose, children's 
literature, and poetry. 



In the very closely scored 
contests, three Archbishop 
Williams High School students 
placed. Mary Beth Fitzgerald, 
Braintree was fourth in play 
reading; Mary Ann Heffron, 
Braintree, fifth in play reading 
and Joyce Peluso, Quincy, 
eighth in poetry. 

The club is scheduled for 
several competitive, contests in 
the near future. 




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Thursday, January 31 , 1974 Quincy Sun Page 17 





ENC To Open 
10- Day Trip Friday 



JUNIOR TENNIS TEAM of the Boston Harbor Marina Tennis Club is made up of [left to right] John 
Cheney, Tony Sullivan, Dennis McCarthy, Coach Cliff Murphy, Heather Underbill, Walter Hannon, 
Cindy Driscoll, Julie Sullivan and Maureen Higgins. 

North Gymnastics Team 
Hosts Weymouth South 



The Eastern Nazarene College 
basketball team has been rolling 
merrily after a slow start and 
Tuesday sought its fifth win in a 
row when it faced Suffolk U. 

Friday the Crusaders will start 
a 10-day trip to New York and 
Pennsylvania when it plays at 
Nyack. Saturday night they will 
be at Eastern Baptist, Monday at 
King's College and Wednesday at 
Point Park College. On Feb. 8 
and 9 they will play in the Olivet 
Nazarene College Tournament. 

ENC, which won four straight 



after a two-point loss to Roger 
Williams and a one-point loss to 
Southeastern Mass., climaxed 
this drive last Saturday with a 
62-59 win over Husson. 

The previous night it had 
defeated Barrington, 70-63, 
following a 58-50 decision over 
Gordon and a 70-65 win over U. 
of Maine [Portland-Gorham 
branch] . 

Following the Husson win 
ENC was 6-5 and had a perfect 
3-0 record in the Seaboard 
Conference. 



Although gymnastics in high 
school is still one of the least 
publicized sports, interest has 
always been high at North 
Quincy under George Golden, 
who coached the Raiders for 
many years, and current coach 
Jack Oliva, who is assisted by 
Ken McPhee. 

The Raiders have always had 
their share of success and, 
following last week's 68-64 win 
over Newton South, they had a 
3-2 Suburban League record. 
Friday North will face' 
Weymouth South at the Narth 
Quincy gym, next Wednesday 
will go to Weymouth North and 
Friday, Feb. 8, will host 
Dennis-Yarmouth. All meets 
atartat 3:30. 

Oliva and McPhee had an 
excellent turnout this year and 
the team now includes 18 boys. 

Q-N Game 
On WCRB 
Feb. 11 



Radio 
[1330AM] 
changes in 



Station WCRB 
has made some 
its broadcasts of 



schonlhrw h/"v1><»" ■■■ iii 

The Quincy-North Quincy 
game at 9:25 Monday, Feb. 11, 
has been added to the schedule. 
The North Quincy-Revere and 
Quincy-Somerville games 
originally scheduled for Jan. 28, 
have been cancelled. 



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Each team member works a 
variety of different pieces which 
require much skill. 

Leading the Raiders are 
Tri-Captains Dave Chartier, who 
performs on the side horse and 
parallel bars; Neil McGilvary, 
high bar, rings and vaulting, and 
Dave Sullivan, floor exercise, 
high bar, parallel bars and 
vaulting. Other seniors are Paul 
Donaghey, parallel bar, and Bob 
Palma, vaulting. 

Juniors are John Mackey, side 
horse; Jerry McKillop, high bar; 
Sean Morgan, floor exercise, 
parallel bars and vaulting; Lee 
Walden, parallel bars, and Biil 
Walsh, floor exercise, high bar, 
parallel bars and rings. 

Sophomores are Ed Coutts, 
high bar and rings; Peter 



Hemphill, side horse and 
vaulting, and Gary Wilkins, floor 
exercise and high bar. 

Five ninth graders round out 
the Raider squad, Art Bertoni, 
side horse and vaulting; John 
Green, side horse; Dave Harrow, 
floor exercise and rings; Dan 
McGuiggan, side horse, and Dave 
Sheridan, floor exercise and 
parallel bars. 

"These boys are really 
dedicated and work awfully 
hard," Oliva said. "I've been 
pleased with the performances. 
We are in a tough league." 

Following the last meet of the 
regular season at Braintree Feb. 
12 at 7 p.m., North will take 
part in the annual Suburban 
League meet at Brockton on 
Feb. 14. 

-TOM SULLIVAN 



Raiderettes Rolling; 
First Ladies Stalled 



The Quincy High girls' 
basketball team, which won the 
Greater Boston League 
championship last year, is having 
its troubles this year but the 
North Quincy girls are very 
much in the running for this 
season's league title. 

Going into Tuesday's games 
Barbara Webster's North girls 
were tied with Maiden and 
Med ford for first place with a 
6-1 record and Tuesday had a 
chance to avenge its only loss [a 
last second one-point loss to 
Maiden]. Friday the Raiderettes 
play at Quincy. They are 74 
overall. 



Gale Palmer's Quincy girls, 
4-3 in the league and 5-6 overall, 
Tuesday faced Chelsea and 
Friday hope to avenge a 29-26 
loss to North when the First 
Ladies sank only two of 16 foul 
shots. 

The Quincy girls provided a 
major upset last week by 
handing Medford its first defeat, 
32-28, and followed up with a 
46-42 win over Revere. 

The North girls, sparked by 
high scoring veteran Denise 
Beresniewicz, have not lost a 
game by more than four points 
this year. 



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Page 18 Quincy Sun Thursday, January 31, 1974 



Hockey 

Quincy Still Eyes Tourney; 
North Shows Improvement 



Tuesday's game with 
Somerville and Friday's game 
with Maiden [6:30 at Boston 
Arena] will go a long way 
toward deciding the Quincy 
High hockey team's chances of 
making the state tourney after 
missing the event each of the 
past two years. 

Undefeated Maiden is leading 
the Greater Boston League and 
once-beaten Somerville is in 
second place. Maiden has 
defeated Quincy twice already as 
did Somerville in the last 
meeting. These were the only 
losses for the Presidents going 
into Tuesday's Somerville 
contest. Monday night at 9 
Quincy will face Revere at the 
Arena. 

Meanwhile, North Quincy, 
showing steady improvement, 
Tuesday faced Revere, Friday 
night meets Medford and next 
Wednesday at 5 takes on 
Somerville. 

Last Friday Bob Sylvia's 
Presidents turned in their second 
successive shutout, 3-0, over 
Revere, to hike their record to 
8-3-2, while Ron Erikson's 
Raiders edged Everett, 4-3, to 
make their record 4-6-2. In its 
last four games North had won 
two, tied one and dropped a 2-1 
heartbreaker to league leading 
Maiden. 

The 3-0 win over Chelsea 



marked Quincy goalie Glen 
Prescott's fourth shutout. 

Quincy's defense continued to 
please Sylvia and he said he felt 
"Teddy Wiedemann and Frankie 
Guest were only a hair away 
from clicking and we are almost 
there as far as scoring is 
concerned. If we can keep up 
the good defense and can just 
get a few more goals, we'll be all 
set for a couple of upsets." 

Guest, sensational sophomore, 
scored twice in the first period, 
at 4:01 with Pete DiBona and 
Bob Barry, assisting, and again at 
6:30 with Wiedemann setting 
him up. Pete Raymer scored the 
third goal in the second period 
with Rick Avery assisting. 

"I'm very happy with this 
win," Erikson said following 
North's victory. "Considering 
how low we were at one point, 
we are now nearing .500 and 
that's not bad." 

Brian Maclsaac scored on a 
solo at 1:33 of the opening 
period and, following two 
Everett goals, Rob Henderson 
tied it for North with Mike 
MacLean and Jim Mullaney 
assisting. McLean put North 
ahead with one second left in 
the first period with Mullaney 
and Henderson assisting. 

Andy Colleran scored what 
proved the winner at 7:25 of the 



second period with assists for 
Maclsaac and John Mackiewiez. 

Earlier in the week Quincy 
turned in a near-perfect game to 
blank Everett, 2-0. 

Prescott turned in another 
brilliant performance in goal to 
notch his third shutout and the 
entire team was impressive. 
"This was one of our better 
games," Sylvia said. 

The Presidents' coach lauded 
his defense which, in his words, 
"has been gaining more 
confidence in itself in every 
game. Not only were the 
defensemen steady on a purely 
defensive aspect, but they 
continually started the play back 
the other way and that's the sign 
of a good defense." 

Sylvia, after having his two 
high scorers, junior Wiedemann 
and sophomore Guest, centering 
different lines, shifted them to 
the same line and the results 
have been good since the move. 

DiBona put Quincy ahead at 
5:45 of the second period when 
he converted passes from Brian 
Nevin and Al Lancione and 
Guest scored an insurance goal 
at 58 seconds of the third period 
with Wiedemann assisting. 

Also coming in for much 
praise was the second line of 
Lancione, DiBona and Pete 
Janis. 



Body Smith Leads Venezia By 2 Points 

and Merrymount 



The Body Smith Shop leads 
Venezia Insurance by two points 
in the Women's Merchants 
Bowling League. 

Body Smith Shop is 94-66 
and Venezia 92-68. South Shore 
Candy is 91-69 in the close race, 
Chiminiello Oil 87-73, Pepe's 



Express 62-98, 
Lanes 54-106. 

Edna Walker heads the Top 
Ten with a 104.2 average, 
followed by Ellie Iacobucci, 
101.8; Noreen Mastroianni, 
101.0; Bev Putnam, 100.1; Ann 
Casanova, 98.6; Terry Spencer, 




The game where 

John Havlicek 

faked out eight people. 

We wanted John Havlicek to 
spokesman" to-rtW r rM^*.' 
Of course we knew John 
wouldn't consent until he was 
convinced he could con- 
fidently lay his reputation on 
the line in endorsing Dial. 
/ **■ WfM To convince John that Dial 

\ ^1 If ^m was a different kind of finance 

V Wk m company, we asked him to do 

» some fancy faking. He was to 
call eight separate Dial offices. 
\ pretending to be someone in- 
% terested in a loan. The hitch? 
Not one of the Dial offices was tipped off about the fact that 
John Havlicek would be calling. Here, in John's words, is 
what happened: . 

"After my first call. I began seeing what Dial meant when 
they said theirs was a company with different dimension. 
Both the phone and my questions were answered promptly 
...and courteously. 

"As I kept making more calls. I was more and more 
amazed by the refreshing directness and professionalism o! 
the Dial people fielding my questions. But the most amazing 
thing to me was this. After making eight calls, never once 
was 1 given a sales pitch or pressured or even asked tny 
name! The Dial people simply gave me the hard facts with- 
out giving me a hard time. 

"Probably the most surprising moment of all was on my 
fifth call I told the Dial person that I had several monthly 
bills from several different sources and I was interested in a 
consolidation loan. I faked some monthly payment figures 
Then he did some figuring of his own and actually advised 
me not to take out a consolidation loan, because the one 
monthly payment 1 would make to Dial wouldn t substan- 
tially reduce the sum of the monthly payments I was now 
making! Imagine that! A finance company advising me 
against a loan Although 1 had loaded the deck and faked the 
fteures so that I had created a rare case, it was still nice to 
know that Dial is a company that acts in your interests... 
and not for its own." u . . 

The kind of service and consideration John Havlicek 
received from Dial isn't reserved just for basketball players 
It's reserved for everybody . . .and has been since 1897 So 
next time you're thinking of borrowing, think of Dial 
Finance. You see. we don't want you to l.ke us just for 
our money. . 

Visit Dial's Randolph office *««»» 

pTaza "phone 5 83 C 3«0 e orher Dial offices: 3 downtown, 
Billerica. Lynn, Maiden, Walpole. 



97.4; Hazel Lewis, 97.1; Elaine 
Rozanski, 97.1; Sandy Barrie, 
96.5 and Nan Magee, 96.4. 

South Shore Candy has high 
team three of 1494, Chiminiello 
high team single of 517, Noreen 
Mastroianni high individual three 
of 339 and high single of 125. 

Mite B's Split 



B team defeated 
in the Bay Colony 



The Mite 
Cohasset, 6-3, 
Association. 

Scott Messina and Joe Harte 
had two goals apiece and Mike 

Burm, Chris Harley and Dick 
Tapper had two assists each. 

The Mite B's lost to Duxbury, 
4-3, with Dennis Cronin, Harte 
and Paul Marshall having the 
Quincy goals and Chris Hurley 
having two assists and Tapper 
one. 

Pee Wee B's 
Tie, 3-3 

The Pee Wee B team played to 
a 3-3 tie with Hyde Park in the 
Bay Colony Association. Ed 
Marella had two Quincy goals 
and Dan Sullivan the other. Dan 
Cronin, Jeff Giordani, Len 
Micelli and Sean Dennis had 
assists. 

Mite A's Tie 

The Mite A team and 
Pembroke played to a 2-2 tie in 
the Bay Colony Association. 
Quincy's goals were scored by 
Dave Allen and Danrty Kelly 
with Rick Reardon, Brian Chase 
and Bobby McCabe having 
assists. 



• Midget House 

Fire Dept. Leads 
Police, Suburban 



The Quincy Fire Dept. has a 
four-point lead over Suburban 
Disposal and a five-point edge 
over Police Dept. in the Midget 
House League following games 
during the past week. 

Disposal blanked South Shore 
Express, 3-0, on goals by Paul 
Vlassakis, Bud Salvern and Joe 
O'Keefe. Vlassakis, Salvern and 
Bob Ahem had assists. 

Tiffany Realty defeated Cox 
Rambler, 4-2, on goals by John 
Whalen, Ralph Richards, Tom 
Morris and Mark Fontaine. 
Assists went to Morris with 
three, Fontaine, Richards and 
Whalen. Scoring for Cox were 
Dan Perdios and Gerry McGrath 
with Perdios also having an 
assist. 

The Fire Dept. walloped 
Police, 6-1, as Bob Crews had 
three goals. Charlie McLean, 
Kurt Dunphy and Mike Doherty 
each had a goal. McLean and 
Dunphy had three assists each, 
Crews, Rick DiPietro, Eric Leslie 
and Mark DeLuca one each. 
Mike Griffin scored for Police 
and John McTighe had an assist. 

Rich's Express edged Tiffany, 
4-3 as Joe Arsenault scored 
twice and John Earl and Tony 
Alessi once each. Assists went to 
Paul Duggan with two, Tom 
Ward and Tony Keenan. Tiffany 
goals were scored by Tom Morris 
with two and Larry Ready with 
Ken Trillcott and John Whalen 
having assists. 

Cox and Police played to a 
2-2 tie as Gerry McGrath and 
Rick Dorney scored for Cox and 
Wally Glendye and Jim 
McAuliffe had assists. Police 
goals were scored by Pat 



Downey and Mike Griffin with 
Dan Barry having an assist. 
Game pucks for Cox went to 
Dorny and goalie Brian 
Chisholm. 

Fire Dept. and Suburban 
Disposal tied, 3-3. Fire goals 
were scored by McLean, Crews 
and Eric Leslie and assists went 
to Dunphy, Marty Kelley and 
Frank McLaughlin; Suburban 
goals were scored by Andy 
Burke, Kevin O'Neil and 
O'Keefe with Jerry Smith having 
two assists, Paul Andrews, 
O'Neil and Frank Penzo having 
assists. 

Police topped Tiffany, 4-2, on 
goals by Jerry Cronin, Greg 
Dillon, Barry and Griffin and 
assists by Mark Walsh, Joe Carty 
and McTighe. Scoring for 
Tiffany were Mike Campbell and 
Brad Harland with an assist for 
Fontaine. 

Cox and Suburban played to a 
3-3 tie as Pitts, Perdios and 
McGrath scored for Cox and 
McGrath, Pitts and Ron 
Hennessey assisted. Vlassakis, 
Jim Ahetrn and O'Keefe scored 
for Suburban and Andy Burke 
and Scott Mitchell had assists. 
Game pucks for Cox went to 
Rick Buccheri for his work in 
goal and Pitts. 

Fire Dept. defeated Rich's, 
5-3, with Doherty, McLean, 
Dunphy, Rick Serino and Crews 
scoring for Fire and "Crews and 
Dunphy having two assists each, 
Eddie Campbell, McLean, 
DeLuca and Doherty one each. 
Goals for Rich's were scored by 
Earl with two and Don Jeffery. 
Collins and Tony Alessi had 
assists. 



Squirt B's Defeat 
Randolph, Milton 



The Squirt B team added two 
wins over the weekend. 

Bobby Kelley's two goals 
paced a 5-1 win over Randolph 
with Timmy Ryan, Kevin Duff 
and Danny Boyle scoring the 
others. 
Mafr'Terineyt 'Steve^iMYfgffs 



and Mike McNiece. 

The Quincy team also romped 
over Milton, 8-3, with McNiece, 
Boyle and Rich Stevens having 
two goals each, Sullivan and Paul 
McCabe one each. There were 
three assists by McNiece and 
&rj\eubx,J8ovle. and Kevin Duff 



Squirt A's Win Pair, 6-1, 6-0 



The Squirt A team defeated 
Bridgewater, 6-1, and Columbia, 
6-0, in the Bay Colony 
Association and played to a 2-2 
tie with Falmouth in a 
non-league scrimmage. 

In the win over Bridgewater 
Joey Rathgeb and Neil Shea had 
two goals each, and Robbie 
Zanardelli and Chuckie Marshall 
scored the others. Assists were 
credited to Marshall with two, 
Danny Flynn, Rathgeb, Tommy 
Heffernan, Kevin Chase, 



Zanardelli and John Carty. 

Marshall paced the win over 
Columbia with two goals, with 
Shea, Mark boussy, Zanardelli 
and Bobby Beniers having one 
apiece. Heffernan, Zanardelli 
and Mike Doherty all had two 
assists, Shea, Karl Nord and 
Kevin Craig one each. 

Both of Quincy's goals in the 
Falmouth tie were scored by 
Doherty with Mike Hussey, Shea 
and Boussy having assists. 



Pee Wee A's Win,3-2; 
Lose, 2-1; Tie 1-1 



The Pee Wee A team played 
three games over the past week 
and had a 1-1-1 record. 

The team edged Falmouth, 
3-2, on goals by Eddie Kane, 
Tommy Brennan and Robbie 
Craig and assists for Bobby 
Hayes, Kane, Kevin McGrath 




and Scott Richardson. 

The Quincy team tied 
Hingham, 1-1 , with Kane scoring 
the goal with assists for Hayes 
and Brennan. 

Johnny Mullin scored the 
only goal in a 2-1 loss to 
Columbia and Bryan McGilvray 
had an assist. 



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471-3100 




Thursday, January 31 , 1974 Quincy Sun Page 19 



• Pee Wee House 

Keohane's, Quincy, 
Morrisette Win 



Kcohanes defeated Davis 
Insurance, 4-1, in the Pee Wee 
House League. 

Bernie Van Tassel, Tim 
Riccardi, John Furey and Phil 
(aggiano scored for the winners. 
Furey had two assists and John 
Newcomb one. 

Team Quincy walloped 
Wollaston Theater, 7-4, with 
William Mathews and John 
D'Andrea scoring two goals 
apiece. Chris Erickson, Mark 
Andrews and Bud Donahue each 
had a goal and Paul Smyth and 
Erickson had two assists each, 
Donahue and Mark Andrews one 
each. Dennis Harrington scored 
twice for Wollaston and' Bob 

• Squirt House 



Monahan and John DeLuca once 
each. Assists went to Jim "ayers 
with two, Harrington, John 
Sayers and Mike Berry. 

Morrisette Post defeated 
Quincy Teachers, 4-1, with Jay 
Collings having two goals and 
Frank O'Connor and Bob 
McHugh one each. Billy Allen 
had two assists, Ed DiTullio and 
Jeff Taylor one each. Kevin 
Cobban had the Teachers' goal. 

Harold Club and UCT played 
to a 2-2 tie. Bob Thomas and 
Dick Newcomb had the Harold 
goals with an assist for 
Newcomb. Mike Scavuzzo and 
Tom Roche scored for UCT with 
Paul Reardon having an assist. 




DD's Upsets Nardone, 
Mclnnis Moves Up 



Nardone Aluminum's lead in 
the Squirt House League was cut 
to one point over Mclnnis 
Construction as Nardone lost to 
Dee Dees, 4-2, and Mclnnis 
defeated McCann Steel, 4-1. 

Bobby Bolster sparked Dee 
Dees with two goals, while Dave 
DiCarlo and Frank McGinn had 
one each. Dave Nigro, Bobby 
Larson, Bolster and Jim Joyce 
had assists. Nardone's goals were 
scored by Brian Donovan and 
John Lyons with Mike Cullen 
anc Steve Burns had assists. 

Mclnnis goals were scored by 
Steve Ricci, Paul Reinhardt, Jim 
Paolucci and Mitch Mclnnis with; 
assists to Paolucci and Kevin 
Burke. Larry Kelly scored the 
McCann goal with Matt Kenney 



assisting. 

Howard Back Realty 
remained tied with Mclnnis for 
second place with a 3-1 win over 
Kyes Meat Supply. Scott 
Freeman, Greg Freeman and 
Chris Chevalier scored for Back 
with Eddie O'Gara, Steve 
DeLuca and Steve Healy having 
assists. Kyes' goal was scored by 
Steve Walsh. 

Hannon Tire and Maher 
Plumbing tied, 2-2. Mike Boussy 
for Hannon and Paul Kelly for 
Maher excelled in goal. Maher 
goals were scored by Kevin 
McSweeney and Steve Igo, while 
Dave'Picot and Jim Seymour 
1 scored for Hannon and Jim 
Furtado and Joe McArdle 
assisted. 



EXECUTIVE ACTION - Goalie Paul Hack and teammate Frank McAuliffe of the light-jerseyed Gold 
Team move to take the puck away from Dick Reinhardt of the Red Team during an Executive League 
hockey game at Quincy Youth Arena. Other identifiable players are John Murphy and John Deitch of 
the Reds and Joe Cunniff [4] and Tom Roberts [2] of the Golds. 

[Photo by Robert A. Curry] 

• Bantam House 

Blackwood Takes 8th; 
Trucks, Burgin-Platner Win 



Moore's Hat Trick Propels 
Bantam B's To 7-0 Win 



Blackwood Pharmacy 
remained undefeated [8-0-2] in 
the Bantam House League and 
maintained *its four-point lead 
over Trucks and Burgin and 
Platner with 'a 4-2 win over 
Baskin Robbins. 

Art Bertoni had three goals 
for Blackwood and Larry Burak 
the other, while assists went to 
Rick Fidler and John Riordan. 
Goals for Baskins were scored by 
Mike Marella and Dave Abbot 
with assists by Bob McCarthy, 
Jim O'Brien and Marella. 

Trucks snapped the Quincy 
Sun's four-game win streak with 
a 5-4 decision as Paul K. Barry 
scored twice for Trucks and Jim 
Constas, Joe McManus and Rich 
Manning had a goal apiece. 



Constas had four assists, Barry 
and McManus two each and 
Manning one. Mike Boyle had 
two goals for the Sun and Rick 
Boyle and Steve Canavanone 
each, while Ed Murphy had two 
assists, Mike Pitts, Gary 
Trenholm and Kevin Whalen one 
each. 

South Shore TV defeated 
Noonan Press, 5-4. Bob 
Lindenfeltzer and Ed DiRamio 
each scored twice for South 
Shore and Jeff Harrison had the 
other goal. Assisting were 
Lindenfeltzer, John Marsters, 
John Murphy and Harrison. 

Scoring for Noonan were 
Eddie Laracy, Paul Vannentini, 
John Picard and Ed Giordano 
with Picard, Lennio Picot, Joe 
Davis, Laracy and Jim Ahola 



having assists. 

Doran & Horrigan walloped 
Bersani Brothers, 6-1, with 
Charlie Dedian and Jim Mossesso 
having two goals apiece, Bill 
Morrison and Bruce Brennan one 
each. Morrison, Stan Campbell, 
John Yaxter and Mike Welch 
assisted. 

Burgin Platner kept pace with 
Trucks with a 3-2 win over 
Johnson Motor Parts. Jimmy 
Deitsch sparkled in the Burgin 
goal. Goals for Burgin were 
scored by Mark Neville, Robbie 
Panico and Peter Plant with 
assists for Tom Bamberry and 
Brendan Coffee. Johnson goals 
were scored by Mark Ricciardi 
and John Cair with Fair, Tommy 
Koelsch and Ricciardi having 
assists. 



Jimmy Moore's hat trick 
propelled the Quincy Bantam 
"B" team to a 7-0 victory over 
Scituate Saturday behind the 
shutout goaltending of Daryl 
DeCristofaro and Kevin Cotter, 
their eighth of the year. 

John Kelly had two goals and 
an assist and Rick Carnali had 
four assists as the Bantam "B" 
lifted its Bay Colony Hockey 
Association record to 15 wins 
and two losses. 

Dave Peters and Don Perdios 
had the other goals with assists 
to Jeff Gavin [2], Mike Wilson, 



Mark Kelly, John Andrews, Jim 
Fitzpatrick, John Norton, and 
Peters. 

A goal and , assist each by 
Perdios and Mark Paolucci and 
Moore's two assists were big 
factors 'in the Bantam "B" 5-2 
win over Weymouth Wednesday 
[Jan. 23] in a non-league 
encounter. 

John Fitzgerald, John Kelly 
and Carnali also had goals with 
assists credited to Jim 
McConville, Mark Kelly and 
Peters. 



Cavanaugh's First Bantam A's Game Winner 



John Cavanaugh scored his 
first goal of the season with 
three seconds remaining to give 
the Quincy Bantam "A" team a 
4-3 victory over Hull in a Bay 
Colony Hockey Association 
game last week. 

Matt Schaeffer, with three 
goals and two assists, had a hand 
in all but one of the scores as the 
Bantam "A" got by Canton 
Saturday to run its league record 
to 25 wins, six losses and a tie. 

John Cooney, Mark Giordani 
and Brian Watts were the other 



goal scorers against Hull and Jim 
Shea, Dave Previte, Rick Dannar, 
Mike Smith and Watts had 
assists. 

Schaeffer's linemates Tommy 



Cahill and Brian Bertoni also had 
fun around the Canton net, each, 
collecting a goal and two assists. 
Dannar had the sixth goal, 
assisted by Previte and Giordani. 



Midget B's Romp 



The Midget B team romped 
over Canton, 12-5, in the Bay 
Colony Association with Larry 
Curtis, Pat McAuliffe, Rick 
Lucier and Dave Perdios scoring 
two goals apiece. 

Single goals were scored by 



Mike Conti, Walter Pimental,- 
Bobby Fitzpatrick and John 
Chivaroli. Lucier, Steve Neville 
and Jack Powers each came up 
with two assists, while Conti, 
McAuliffe, Jeff Murphy and Joe 
Pistorino had one each. 



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Page 20 Quincy Sun Thursday, January 31 , 1974 



Junior High Spotlight 

Broadmeadows Hands 
A-N First Loss, 29-25 



The Atlantic-North ninth 
grade basketball team suffered 
its first loss of the year last week 
as it was surprised by Broad 
Meadows, 29-25. 

In the big win for Broad 
Meadows, Lyle Mormon paced 
the winners with 1 1 points and 
Jack Uhlar had 10. John White 
had eight for North, Jim 
McGinly six and Keith 
Lindbergh five. 

Atlantic's eighth grade team 
won, 23-12, ■ sparked by Joe 
Deane's seven points and Bobby 
Doyle's six. Kevin Connors 
scored four for BM. 

Atlantic's seventh graders also 
won, 13-6, with Bobby Grant 
having four points for the 
winners and Bud Peters four for 
BM. 

Sterling took two out of three 
games from Central. Central's 
ninth grade won, 32-26, with 
Jimmy Smith scoring 15 points. 
Tom Nee came off the bench 
and had a big day on the boards. 

Sterling's eighth grade won, 
21-13, paced by John Sylva's 10 
points. Wink Phelan had six and 



Bob Evans three for Central. 

The Sterling seventh graders 
also won, 11-10, with a basket in 
the final two seconds. Steve 
Tuma had eight points for 
Central. 

Earlier in the week Central 
won two of three games from 
Broad Meadows. Central's ninth 
grade team romped, 40-26, with 
Dan Cuddy scoring 17 points 
and 'Smith 14 for Central. 
Morrison had 10 and Uhlar six 
for BM. 

The BM eighth graders won, 
21-13, with Kevin Connors 
having eight points and Ron 
Donovan seven for BM. Steve 
Germain's six points and four by 
Phelan paced Central. 

Central's seventh graders won, 
16-9, with Tommy Bellotti and 



Mark Roberts scoring four each 
for Central and Mike Connolly 
six for BM. 

Atlantic-North swept all three 
games from Point. The ninth 
graders breezed, 35-10, as 
Lindbergh had 12 points. Bob 
Stack, White and Eddie 
McElaney had four apiece and 
Bobby D'Olympio had four for 
Point. 

The A-N eighth grade also 
won easily, 29-9,, paced by 
Deane's eight points, Mike 
Larkin's seven and Doyle's six. 
Ken Ames was tops for Point 
with six. 

Atlantic's seventh grade team 
wo/i, 12-9, with Bobby Grant 
having seven points. 



QYHA Dance Feb. 8 



The Quincy Youth Hockey 
Association will sponsor a dance 
on Friday, Feb. 8, in St. Mary's 
Hall, West Quincy. 

Tickets, formerly sold to 
QYH members only, now are 
available to the general public. 



Music will be furnished by the 
Shannonaires. 

Those wanting tickets can 
obtain them from any member 
of the committee or call Audrey 
Hayes at 472-3243. 




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AT THE QUINCY SUN 1601 HANCOCK ST. 



Junior High Wrestling 
Season Opens 



Wrestling in the Quincy 
Junior high schools is still 
growing and this year each of 
the five schools will have eight 
dual meets, meeting each rival 
twice, and the season will 
conclude with a city-wide 
championship meet at Voc-Tech 
gym early in March. 

A year ago all junior high 
schools had wrestling for the 
first time and Sterling won the 
city title with a 4-0 record. 
Broad Meadows was 3-1, 
Atlantic-North, 2-2; Central, 1-3, 
and Point, the smallest school, 
0-4. 

Pioneering the sport in the 
junior high schools was Carmen 
Mariano, a teacher-coach at 
Sterling, who began the sport 
three years ago when he began 
teaching there. 

He had eight or 10 boys and 
had one meet with Braintree. 
Two years ago he had about 30 
boys and Sterling had four 
meets, two with Milton, one 
with Braintree and at the end of 
the year Mariano approached 
Jack Oliva at Atlantic and had a 
meet with them, the first such 
intra-city meet in the city's 
history. 

This year Mariano is on a 
leave of absence from the school 
system and is finishing graduate 
studies at Harvard and Steve 
Joyce has taken over the Sterling 
reins. Mariano works with him 
when he has no classes. 

The other coaches are the 
same as a year ago with Brooks 
Maloof at Atlantic-North, John 
Bogan at Broad Meadows, Gerry 
Mulvey at Point and Bob Schiess 
at Central. 

"Mr. Leone I Carl Leone, 
coordinator of athletics] has 
been very helpful," Mariano 
said. "He has 75 new uniforms 
to be distributed evenly among 



the five teams to be worn in 
competition, as well as 
head-guards and has arranged for 
competent officials for each 
meet." Mariano, incidentally, 
will be one of the league 
officials. 

He explained that the matches 
will be much more formal this 
year with official weigh-ins 
before each meet and specific 
weight limits being placed on 
each of the 1 5 classes. 

"Mr. Leone has also been kind 
enough to mention high school 
wrestling as a proposed new 
interscholastic sport on this 
year's school budget now before 
the school committee," Mariano 
added. "It is third on the list 
behind girls' track and girls' field 
hockey. Many of the boys whom 
I coached for three years as well 
as others throughout the city 
have sent letters to the school 
committeemen asking them to 
allocate funds for high school 
wrestling for next year. These 
boys have worked with such 
commitment and dedication in 
junior high, it seems only fair 
that they should be afforded the 
opportunity of continuing their 
efforts at the high school level. I 
have my fingers crossed for 
them." 

"I am very enthused about 
this program and Carmen 
deserves a lot of credit for 
getting it started," Leone said. 
"I want to do all I can to see the 
program expand and I'm looking 
forward to adding wrestling to 
our high school program and 
think it will be a very worthy 
addition." 

Many schools in the area 
including Weymouth, Braintree, 
Milton and Scituate, have had 
wrestling for several years and a 
number of smaller schools have 
started the sport. 

-TOM SULLIVAN 



• St. Ann's Hockey 

Bruins, Flyers, 
Flames In Wins 



In St. Ann's Hockey League 
Pee Wee action at the Shea rink, 
the Bruins edged New York, 2-1 
on goals by Greg Therrien and 
Mike Milline. 

Tom McFarland, Al Vasile 
and Greg Kelly had assists. Bob 
Sullivan scored New York's goal 
with John Gorezca assisting. 

The Flyers topped the 
Northstars, 3-1, with Paul 
O'Sullivan scoring two goals and 
Jim Meehan the other. Craig 
DiBona, Marc Litiff and Meehan 
had assists. Brian Meehan had 
the only Northstars goal 
unassisted. 

Detroit nipped the Flames, 
2-1, with Andy Gillis and Steve 
Hogan scoring for the winners 
and John Kiley and Dan Rowley 
assisting. Tom Orrock had the 
Flames' goal unassisted. 

In Bantam action Detroit and 
the Flames played to a 2-2 tie. 
Mike Therrien and Ken Olson 
scored for Detroit and Bill 



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Shine, John Capone, John 
Hubbard and Kevin Dowing 
assisted. For the Flames Jack 
O'Leary and Steve Olson had the 
goals and Joe Carr, Tom Rieman 
and John Lee assists. 

The Flyers rolled over New 
York, 4-1, with Karl Olson 
scoring two goals, Chuck Winters 
and Steve Clinton one each. 
Assists went to Rich Carpenter, 
Tom Duane, Mike DeFazio and 
Winters. Bob Carroll was 
outstanding in the Flyers' goal. 
Carl Bergstrom had the New 
York goal with Ken O'Connell 
and Frank Kelly assisting. 

The Bruins blanked the 
Northstars, 4-0, as Paul 
Redmond turned in an 
outstanding job in goal. Jim 
Orland had two goals, Jim 
Doherty and Mike DeAngelo one 
each. Assisting were Orlando, 
Larry Cyr, Mike Gethin and 
DeAngelo. 

* * 4 * * * ¥ *~* ****** * *^ 

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NEWS & BOOK STANU 
1500 HANCOCK ST. 



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Thursday , January 3 1 , 1974 Quincy Sun Page 2 1 



Koch Club Presents Chiminiello, Gagne Trophies 



Two special trophy awards 
were presented Sunday before 
the opening of the 21st annual 
Greater Quincy Men's Candlepin 
Bowling Tourney matches at the 
Merrymount Daylight Alleys. 

Richard J. Koch, tourney 
founder and director of the 
Koch Club, awarded the Emil 
Chiminiello Memorial Trophy to 
Dick Ewell of Whitman 
Merchants as the outstanding 
bowler in the 20 years of 
tourney competition. 

The Charles A. Gagne 
Memorial Trophy was presented 
by Koch to Jim Powers as the 
outstanding bowler in the 20th 
anniversary year of competition. 

The late Emil Chiminiello was 
cited by Koch for his interest in 
candlepin bowling, and the 
family participation by the 
Chiminiello brothers, as 



outstanding competitive bowlers 
in the New England area, before 
its popularity grew. 

Emil Chiminiello participated 
in the tourney for several years, 
bowling with a number of teams. 

Charlie Gagne, an outstanding 
candlepin bowling enthusiast, 
bowled and helped organize the 
Quincy Merchants and Colonial 
Bowling Leagues, and although 
bowling in several tourney 
competitions offered great 
assistance each year in the 
Greater Quincy Men's Tourney. 

The selection committee 
included George Page and Henry 
Johnson. They picked Ewell for 
his outstanding consistent 
performance during the 20 years 
of tourney competition, and 
Powers for his individual display 
during the 20th anniversary 
rolloff. 



O'Brien Club Drubs 
Bruins, 130-112 



The O'Brien Club basketball 
team of Quincy, which has had 
little trouble breezing through 
the Cranberry League, last 
Sunday established itself as one 
of New England's top semi-pro 
teams when it walloped the 
previously undefeated Haynes 
Bruins of Boston, 130-112, at 
North Quincy in a non-league 
game. 

The Haynes Club, which had 
dominated the Boston Park 
League for years, is leading the 
Eastern Mass. League and this 
was the worst defeat in its 
history. 

The O'Brien Club, 15-0 
overall and 13-0 in the 
Cranberry League, last 
Wednesday played the Wholey 
Club of Hull. Sunday it will host 
the second place Boston Stars at 
7:30 p.m. at North Quincy and 
next Wednesday will play the 



Easton Huskies at North Easton. 
All are league games. 

Ron Bradley paced the attack 
Sunday with 24 points, followed 
by Al Dalton with 21, Pete 
Schmid with 1 7, Bob McNamara 
with 16, Moe Shoeper with 14 
and a great rebounding job, and 
Mike Greenlaw with 13. 

Last Friday, playing with only 
eight men, the O'Briens rolled 
over the Bristol County 
Cavaliers, 132-100, at Fall River. 

Schmid broke the club record 
with 38 points, Rich Sprague 
had his best night with 27, 
Dalton scored 25 and McNamara 
24. 

Schmid leads the O'Brien club 
with an average of 21.2 points a 
game, followed by Dalton, 20.3; 
Eddie Miller, 18.8; Bradley, 
17.0; McNamara. 14.0; Sprague, 
1 1.7; Greenlaw, 9.5; Mike Dunn, 
7.7, and Shoeper, 5.8. 



Marina Tennis Tourney 



Richard Holbert and Charles 
Peix won the member-guest 
tournament at the Harbor 
Marina Tennis Club. ' 

They defeated Larry 
Courtney and Paul Paluzzi, 6-1, 
6-2, in the final round. 
Semi Final 

Courtney and Paluzzi def. 
William Fielding and Richard 
Hatton, 64, 6-4. 

Holbert and Peix def. Paul 
Hurley and Richard Garvey, 6-1, 

6-3. 

Quarter Final 

Fielding and Hatton def. John 
r ->rrigan and Dan McElaney, 
c 6-0. 

Courtney and Paluzzi def. 
Matthew Burke and Fred 
Cavanaugh, 6-1, 6-1. 

Hurley and Garvey def. 
Robert Tilley and Paul Berrini, 
6-4, 6-3. • 

Holbert and Peix def. Paul 
**************** 

* 
* 



Smoot and James Michaudo, 
6-2,6-1. 

First Round 

Fielding and Hatton def. Peter 
and James McCarrick, 6-1, 6-1. 

Corrigan and McElaney def. 
Joe Shertick and Charles Epps, 
6-0, 6-0. 

Courtney and Paluzzi def. 
David Gavin and Richard 
Barbuto, 6-1 , 6-1. 

Burke and Cavanaugh def. 
Paul McCarrick and Tom Kelley, 
6-2, 6-2. 

Hurley and Garvey def. James 
McCall and Chester Schmitz, 
6-0, 6-0. 

Tilley and Berrini def. William 
and George McCall, 5-7, 6-4, 6-1. 

Smoot and Michaudo def. 
Paul O'Malley and Mark 
McGuinness, 7-6, 3-6, 7-6. 

Holbert and Peix def. John 
Herlihy and Joseph Berlandi, 
6-1,6-0. 
•***•*•**••**** 



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1974 
CHEVROLETS 

At The Old Price 

Get Them While They Last 

Duggon Bros. 

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TOP BOWLERS - Dick Ewell [center] and Jim Powers [right] receive trophies from Richard J. Koch 
prior to start of 21st Greater Quincy Men's Candlepin Tourney at Merrymount Daylight Alleys. Ewell 
won the Emil Chiminiello Memorial Trophy as the outstanding bowler in the 20 years of tourney play 
and Powers took the Charles A. Gagne Memorial Trophy as the outstanding bowler in the 20th year of 
competition. 

Gold, Green Win In St. Joseph's Hockey 



The Gold team defeated the 
Blues, 4-2, and the Greens 
topped the Reds, 5-1, in St. 
Joseph's Hockey League action 
at the Shea rink. 

The Golds moved into a first 
place tie with the Reds as Mike 



Grogan sparked them against the 
Blues with two goals. Dan 
McCormick and Butch 
Franceshini scored the others. 
Mark Walker and Jeff Aristide 
scored the Blue goals. 

The Greens picked up their 



second straight win after nine 
losses in a major upset. Charles 
Shea scored twice for the Greens 
and Dave McQuade, Chris Kane 
and Gary Mikowslci had one 
each. Mike McNally scored the 
only Red goal. 




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F»ge 22 Quincy Sun Thursday, January 31 . 1974 

•Basketball 



Quincy, North In Race For GBL Title 



The Greater Boston League 
basketball race is getting to be a 
real dog fight with both Quincy 
and North Quincy very much in 
the running for the title. 

Going into Tuesday's games 
[ Chelsea at Quincy and North at 
Maiden], the Presidents were 
tied for first with Everett and 
Maiden [all 6-3], while the 
Raiders and Somerville were 
deadlocked one game behind 
with 5-4 marks. 

Friday Quincy will play at 
North, hoping to knock off the 
Raiders for the second time, and 
Friday, Feb. 8, it will be 
Somerville at Quincy and North 
at Revere. There are no games 
next Tuesday. 

Joe Amorosino's Quincy team 
made a great comeback in the 
final period last Friday to 
overcome a six-point deficit and 



defeat Revere, 66-60. Revere 
led, 45-39, after three periods. 
The win gave Quincy an overall 
8-4 record. 

Three Presidents fouled out 
and the hench came through in 
fine style. Amorosino also was 
without two injured outstanding 
starters, Fred Donahue and Billy 
Joyce. Joyce is expected to 
return Friday but Donahue may 
be through for the year. 

Quincy's winning rally was a 
combined effort by Mark 
Dwyer, Tom McKinnon, John 
MacFarlane and 6-5 Tom Perry, 
whose return, it is hoped by 
Amorosino, will help make up 
for Donahue's loss. 

Dwyer had a big night from 
the foul line with 1 1 for 13 and 
led the scorers with 17 points. 
Cullen had 12 points before 
fouling out and Bill Dacey also 



had 1 2 before he fouled out. 

Bob Nolan's North team also 
made a thrilling comeback but it 
just fell short in a 5 1-50 loss at 
Somerville's "snake pit". 

Somerville jumped off to an 
18-9 first period lead and 
increased it to 23-10 midway in 
the second quarter but it was all 
North the rest of the way. 

"I'm really proud of the kids 
for making such a comeback, 
especially at Somerville," Nolan 
said. "After they moved ahead 
by 13, our defense again came 
through with a great effort." 

Sophomore Cooper Jordan, 
improving in every game, missed 
one period because of playing 
with the junior varsity but 
scored 20 points and had five 
rebounds. He scored six of 17 
last period points as the Raiders 
just missed pulling it out. 



Earlier in the week the strain 
of playing six out of seven games 
on the road took its toll on 
Quincy as it lost at Medford, 
65-52. 

"The boys fought back well 
and Medford led at one time by 
22 points and the score did not 
indicate the kind of game it 
was," Amorosino said. "We just 
had too many turnovers and 
again shot poorly." 

Cullen paced the Presidents 
with 12 points and McKinnon 
was the only other player in 
double figures with 10 points. 

North Quincy, with its 
awesome defense at its best, 
upset Everett, tied for the league 
lead, 50-47. 

North, which bounced back 
from a 35-31 deficit at the 
three-quarter mark, saw its own 
46-41 lead melt away with a 



minute to play. 

"We called time out with 
eight seconds left and the score 
tied," Nolan said. "We wanted 
to get the ball to Steve Miller 
but couldn't do it." Miller and 
Jed Phelan brought the ball 
up-court to Tim Clifford, who 
passed to John Flynn. Flynn laid 
the ball in with no time showing 
on the clock, was fouled and 
sank the free throw. 

Phelan led the scoring with 1 8 
points and Flynn scored 10, but 
Nolan had words of praise for 
the entire squad. He was 
especially enthused about his 
defense, describing it as "one of 
the best man-to-man games I've 
ever seen." 

The North junior varsity 
breezed, 42-27, to hike its 
record to 9-1. 



Koch Club Bowling 



14 Teams Compete In Men's Candlepin Tourney 



The opening rounds of the 
21st annual Greater Quincy 
Men's Candlepin Bowling 
Tourney continued Sunday with 
14 teams competing in the Koch 
Club sponsored event. 

Carlyle Merchants of Whitman 
pulled out a 1746-1701 victory 
over the Hull Men's League; East 
Weymouth ousted St. Boniface 
1737-1604; Montclair Couples 

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Men defeated Canton 
Businessmen 1693-1623; Beau's 
Place eliminated Louis 
1677-1577; O.S.M. topped 
Sawyer-Campbell 1677-1526; 
Quincy Church League outlasted 
South Shore Businessmen. 
1658-1630 and in the lowest 
scoring match of the day Federal 
Auto Body pulled by St. John's 
Holy Name 1604-1552. 

Whitman squeezed by Hull 
with an eight-pin lead going into 
the second string with Bob 
Hurst's 150 keeping Hull in 
contention. In the second, Hull 
roared back to take the string by 
36 pins over Whitman, and a 
28-pin advantage into the final. 

Whitman found itself trailing 
by 40 pins midway through the 
final string, but put on a last 
ditch surge with big marks in 
eight of their last 15 boxes to 
put the win out of Hull's reach. 



Dick Ewell, outstanding 
' tourney bowler was high for 
Whitman with 391, and was 
assisted ih the victory by Paul 
Kirby 363, Dennis Chick 360, 
Jim Rigo 323, and Bill Durfee 
309. 

Steve McGunnigle with 372 
was top for the losing Hull squad 
followed by Bob Hurst 354, Dan 
Williams 346, Joe Boglione 322, 
and Al Carfagna 307. 

A strong East Weymouth 
entry could only win its first 
string by seven pins over St. 
Boniface and added 20 more in 
the second, but caught fire in 
the final, firing a 622 high team 
single for the day, and a 133 pin 
victory. 

Barry Lang had 383 for the 
East Weymouth winners 
followed by Bob Shannon and 
Mike Fardy each with 345, Rich 
Chilingarian 333, and Dick 




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Cassani 331. 

Ron Boben with 342 was high 
for losing the St. Boniface, Bill 
Landry was next with 334, Joe 
D'Angelo 324, and Warren 
Spencer 308. 

Montclair couples men 
jumped to 13 pin first string lead 
on a 153 string fired by Wally 
Bereszniewicz. The high string of 
the day, Montclair continued to 
a sweep over Canton taking the 
second by 14 and third by 43 
pins for their victory. 

Top man for Montclair and 
the day was Bereszniewcz with 
423, including strings of 
153-126-144, second high for 
Montclair was Andy Orrock 337, 
Bob Maloney 333, and BUI 
Jacobsen 302. 

Sonny Sykes was top for 
losing Canton with a 366, Don 
Cappacino 343, and Dick Rogan 
330. 

Beau's Place jumped off to a 
78-pin first string lead over 
Louis, dropped the second by 
12, but bounced back to take 
the final by 32 and win the 
match easily by 1 00 pins. 

Beau's leading scorer was 
Buster Loud with 356 followed 
by Bob Hiller, 353, Fred 
Connelly 337, Ron Leone 321, 
and Jim Blake 310. 

Ed Rogers was high man for 
the losing Louis team with 349, 
Ken White had 331 Tom 
Tordoff 318, and Norm 
LaFIamme 302. 

O.S.M. captured the first 
string by 84 pins over 
Sawyer-Campbell, then 
continued to sweep with a 
second and third string win, for 
a clean and complete victory of 
151 pins. 

Al Sturgeon showed the way 
for O.S.M. with 365, with 
assistance from Ralph Devito 
347, Ernie Von Iderstein 324, 
Paul Cuddemi 323, and Larry 
Maki318. 



Fight 
Them All 

Heart Attack, Stroke 

High Blood Pressure 

Rheumatic Fever 



John Gardner and Bob 
Blanchard each bowled 317 to 
lead the losing Sawyer-Campbell, 
while Ed Hanlon bowled 302 
and Tom O'Brien 301 for the 
losers. 

Quincy Church league beat 
the South Shore Businessmen by 
nine pins in the first string 
picked up 41 more in the 
second, and held onto the lead 
as the losers tried an 
unsuccessful comeback in the 
final string. 

Quincy Church League high 
man was Dick Peterson with a 
torrid 390, Rich Collins 359, 
Dave Bates 316, and Henry 
Johnson 301. 

For the losing South Shore 
Businessmen Frank Farren was 
best with 341, Bill Cross had 
339, Joe Manning 326, Bob 
D'Orval 322, and BUI O'MaUey 
302. Federal Auto Body fell 
behind by 18 pins in the first 
string, but roared back to take 
the second by 60 pins and the 
last string by 10, for their 52 pin 
victory, over St. John's Holy 
Name. Bob Delia Barba led 
Federal Auto Body with 365, 
Vic Tricomi 340, Arthur 
Richards 320, and Bill Damore 
300. 

Mike Lindblom was top for 
the losers with 341 followed by 
Earl Lauretto 327, Ron 
DiRamio 306, and Rich 
DiRamio301. 

The Quincy Merchants with 
1775 high team three in the 
opening rounds have earned a 
Bye into the tourney 
quarterfinals on Feb. 10, the 
remaining 12 winners will bowl 
next Sunday afternoon at 1 p.m. 
seeking a win for the tourney 
. quarterfinals. 

The tourney is sponsored for 
the 21st year by the Koch Club 
of Quincy as part of its winter 
athletic and recreation program. 




Help your Heart... Help your Heart Fund 



\\ 



# Track 



Thursday, January 31 , 1974 Quincy Sun Page 23 

TOP TWOSOME 



Quincy In 2nd Place Tie; 
North Ends With 2-5 Slate 



Quincy High's track team 
finished in a second place tie in 
the Greater Boston League with 
a 5-2 record when it defeated 
North Quincy, 49-37, last 
Saturday in the final league meet 
at Medford. North finished with 
a 2-5 league record. 

North's Geoff Hennessey won 
the hurdles to finish unbeaten in 
the league, with Art DiLoreto 
and Steve Burke of Quincy 
second and third, North's John 
Flynn won the 50-yard dash 
with Alan Vachon of Quincy 
second and North's Paul 
Doherty Third. Quincy's Steve 
Oriola won the 300 with North's 
Phil Robinson second and 
Quincy's Pete Ramponi third. 

Steve Nolan of Quincy won 
the 600 with teammate Dave 
DiBona second and North's John 
Mackey third. Dan Minton of 
North won the shot put with 
Quincy's Bob Varrasso and 
Burke second and third. Gary 
Delorio of Quincy finished 
undefeated by winning the 1000 
with teammates Steve Player and 



Bob Nolan second and third. 

North's sensational 
sophomore Bart Petracca won 
the mile with Quincy's Arnie 
Vorrosso second and North's Bill 
Lapsley third. North's Art and 
Ken Barrett were 1-2 in the 
two-mile with Quincy's Kevin 
O'Brien third, Art DeLoreto of 
Quincy won the high jump with 
North's Mark Canavan second 
and Quincy sophomore Leo 
Barron third. Quincy's relay 
team of Oriola, Ramponi, Steve 
Nolan and DiBona also won. 

Quincy had the satisfaction of 
being the only team to defeat 
league champion Medford. 

Earlier in the week North lost, 
50-35, to Boston English in a 
n o n-league meet at. 
Commonwealth Armory in 
Boston. 

Petracca won the mile with an 
excellent timing of 4:40.5, only 
four tenths of a second off the 
school record. Lapsley was third. 

Art Barrett won the two-mile 
with younger brother Ken 
second. Hennessey won the high 



hurdles with Neil McPartlin 
third. Chris Cordeiro was second 
in the 1000, Canavan was second 
in the 600, his first loss of the 
year, but it took the fastest time 
in Boston school history, 1:16.8 
by English's Charlie Scales to 
defeat, him. Robinson was 
second in the 300, Doherty 
second and Brett McGrath third 
in the shot put and Canavan 
second in the high jump. 

Prior to this meet Robinson, 
Cordeiro and Hennessey were 
elected tri-captains for this year. 

North had earlier defeated 
Brighton and Hyde Park, 
59-3P/2-12, in a non-league 
meet. 

In the State Coaches' Meet in 
Boston, North's distance relay 
team finished fifth and received 
medals. Each of the runners, 
Canavan, Cordeiro, Lapsley and 
Mackey, ran 670-yard legs. 
Other North entrants in the 
meet were McPartlin, Art 
Barrett, Mike Nee, Robinson, 
Dennis McGuire and Ken 
O'Brien. 




In Little Loop 

Andrews' 315 Sparks 
Brett Club To Vital Win 



ARNOLD PALMER, Honorary National Chairman of the March of 
Dimes, joins Scott Hafen, 5, National Poster Child from Las Vegas, 
Nev., in urging support for the fight to prevent birth defects. 

Men's Physical Fitness 
Program At Atlantic Junior 



Sparked by Capt. John 
Andrews' 315 and weekly high 
single of 121, the Joseph E. 
Brett Club defeated the 
Montclair Men's Club, 3-1, and 
increased its Quincy Bowling 
Little Loop lead to four points 
over the Dick Morrissey Club, 
which tied Local 513,2-2. 

The Morrissey Club and 
Montclair have the same 
won-lost records but Morrissey is 
in second place by virtue of total 
pinfall. 

The hottest teams over the 
last three weeks have been 
Atlantic Fuel Oil and 
Hutchinson Oil, each taking 10 



of a possible 1 2 points to move 
into contention. 

Brett leads the league with a 
38-18 record and total pinfall of 
17,094. Morrissey is 34-22 
[17,284] and Montclair 34-22 
[17,143]. Atlantic is 
[17,088]; Hutchinson 
[16,941], and Granite 
1451 31-25 [ 16,736]. Wollaston 
Bowladrom is 29-27 [16,748]; 
Hennessy Plumbing Supply, 
26-30 [16,731]; DA George G. 
Burke, 25-31 [16,715]; Bryan 
Post VFW, 24-32 [16,538]; 
Quincy Elks, 23-33, [16,843]; 
Sch. Comm. Hal Davis, 23-33 
[16,543]; James R. Mclntyre 



31-25 
31-25 
Lodge 



Club, 21-35 [17,714] and Local 
513 AFL-CIO, 21-35 [16,624]. 

Nick Anastas leads the Top 
Ten with a 97.8 average, 
followed by Dan Finn, 97.0; 
Mike Regan, 96.20; Brian 
Connolly, 93.39; Dick Kelty, 
91.8; Andrews, 91.26; Larry 
McGrath, 90.26; Jim McAllister, 
90.2; Kev Mullaney, 89.37 and 
Kan Allman, 89.18. 

Montclair has high team three 
of 1337 and high team single of 
473. Finn has high individual 
three of 332 and Connolly and 
Dick Stohlberg are tied for high 
single of 134. 



The Quincy Recreation 
Department's Physical Fitness 
Program for Men is held Monday 
evenings, from 7 p.m. until 10 
p.m. at Atlantic Junior High 
School, Hollis Avenue, North 
Quincy. 

Recreation Director William 
F. Ryan said the 25-week 
program will continue through 
the winter and will offer a 
graduated schedule of 
calisthenics, volleyball, jogging, 



basketball, and use of gymnastic 
equipment. The program is 
directed by John (Butch) 
Mahoney. 

The program is open to 
Quincy residents beyond high 
school age through 65. 
Participants are urged to wear 
sneakers and proper gymnasium 
attire. There will be no 
pre-registration for this free 
program as registrations will be 
taken at every session. 



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Applications For 



••••••••••••••••••a * * * * *••••• 



Women's 
Tourney 

The 19th annual South Shore 
Women's Candlepin Bowling 
Tourney will begin Sunday Feb. 
17, at 1 p.m. at the Merrymount 
Daylight Alleys. 

Applications are now 
available, and may be picked up 
at the Merrymount Alleys, 17 
Broad St., Quincy. 

Teams must be from an 
organized Women's Candlepin 
Bowling League, "No Pickup 
Teams are allowed". 

The top five bowlers in the 
league, as of Feb. 1, bowl in 
competition with the sixth and 
seventh bowlers in the standings 
used as alternates. If one of the 
top seven bowlers cannot 
compete, the league officials 
may continue to choose down in 
the standings according to 
average, until the seven members 



Candlepin 
Available 

are selected. 

Bowlers entered must have 
bowled half the season thus far 
with their respective leagues, and 
may only bowl for one tourney 
entry. Any violation of the rules 
will forfeit the teams 
participation or continuance. 

All tourney matches will be 
decided on total pinfall. It is an 
elimination tourney, and each 
team must win to continue. 

The championship team will 
receive individual trophies, and a 
team prize of $50 cash. Trophies, 
will also be presented for high 
tourney average, three string 
total, and high single. 

The tourney is annually 
sponsored by the Koch Club of 
Quincy, as part of its winter 
athletic and recreation program. 



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Page 24 Quincy Sun Thursday, January 31 , 1974 




HONORED GUEST - Frankie Guest fright] , Quincy High's sophomore hockey whiz, receives 'Player of 
the Week' citation from Lance LoFaro, producer of Hockey Night in Boston, which broadcasts selected 
high school hockey games over Radio WCRB. Looking on are Ed Percy of Miller Studio, Quincy High 
School Principal Lloyd Creighton and Quincy Coach Bob Sylvia. Citation was for Guest's play against 
North Quincy Dec. 24 and makes him eligible for 'Player of the Year' award - a road trip with the New 
England Whalers. 

Quincy Junior- Frosh Team Has 
Pride, Tradition As Incentives 



The Quincy Junior 
High-Freshman hockey team 
finished first in the Greater 
Boston Freshman League the 
past two years, winning the 
playoffs last year and losing in 
the finals two years ago. 

This year Coach Ken Hayes' 
young Presidents are having their 
troubles and going into 
Tuesday's game against North 
Quincy they had only a 3-9 
record, and of course, are out of 
the playoffs. 

"This year's team has more 
pride and tradition than my 
previous teams as seven players 
have older brothers who are 
playing or have played with the 
high school varsity," Hayes 
explained. "But, although the 
boys have been playing some 
• good hockey, they just haven't 
been able to put everything 
together. 

"This is our last year in the 
Greater Boston League and I 
hope next season, when we 
move to the Suburban League, 
we can play some games in 
Quincy." The GBL freshmen 
play all their games at Skaters' 
World in Revere. 

Most of this year's players 
come from Broad Meadows. 
They are Jack Campbell, seventh 
grade defenseman; Rich Boyle, 
ninth grade forward; Jim 
Buchanan, ninth grade goalie; 
Mark Giordani, eighth grade 
forward; Dave Flynn, eighth 
grade defenseman; Mike Van 
Tassell, eighth grade forward 
Tom Bamberry, ninth grade 



forward; Pat Bamberry, eighth 
grade defenseman; Mark 
Connolly, ninth grade forward, 
'and John Yaxter, eighth grade 
forward. Boyle, Girodani, Tom 
and Pat Bamberry arid Yaxter 
played a year ago. 

From Central are Dean 
Prescott, seventh grade goalie; 
John Norton, seventh grade 
forward; Dave Previte, ninth 
grade forward, and Dave Lewis, 
eighth grade forward. Lewis 
played last season. 

The only player from Point is 
Don Perdios, eighth grade 
forward. 

Sterling's representatives are 
Mark Ricciardi, ninth grade 
forward; Brian Bertoni, eighth 
grade defenseman; Paul Reardon 
and Paul Gaudiano, ninth grade 
goalies. 

From Quincy Voc-Tech are 
Paul Gustafson, ninth grade 
center; Mike Boyle, ninth grade 
forward, and Larry Calley, ninth 
grade defenseman. Gustafson 
and Calley are veterans. 

Gustafson and Calley are 
captains, Bertoni and Previte 
assistant captains and Charles 
Lewis and Mike Dolan managers. 

Bertoni's brother Harry 
played varsity hockey and 
Dennis is playing on this winter's 
jayvee team; Kearney's brothers 
Colin and Kenny played on the 
varsity and Leo is now on the 
varsity; Prescott's brother John 
played varsity hockey and Glen 
is now the varsity's outstanding 
goalie. Rich and Mike Boyle's 
brother Art was a varsity 
standout and Bob is one of this 



year's top varsity players. 
Cedrone's brothers Jim and 
Steve played on the varsity; 
Lewis' brothers Kevin and Steve 
played on the varsity, as did 
Campbell's brother Paul. Tom 
and Pat Bamberry are brothers 
as are Mark and Jeff Giordani. 

"This is a building year as we 
lost all of our starting team, part 
of the second line <jnd our 
fourth defenseman from last 
year's champions," Hayes 
pointed out. "Our first line has 
Previte at center between Mark 
Giordani and Ricciardi, with 
Bertoni, normally a forward, 
playing defense with Calley. I 
have been alternating Buchanan, 
Prescott, Gaudiano and Reardon 
in goal." 

Hayes' second line is made up 
of Gustafson at center between 
Lewis and Norton with 
Campbell and Tom Bamberry on 
defense. Playing on the third line 
are Van Tassell center with 
Yaxter or Boyle and Connolly 
wings. 

"We have done all right on 
offense but we are weak on 
defense and in goal," Hayes said. 
"Also, some of the boys who 
started out with us quit." 

Following last week's games 
Bertoni had nine goals to lead 
the team. Lewis had seven goals 
and Previte and Gustafson had 
five each. 

Ed Grogan's North Quincy 
team has not fared much better 
than Quincy and going into 
Tuesday's Quincy game had a 
4-8 record. 

By TOM SULLIVAN 



Trades Make Sox 
Strong Contender 



By TOM SULLIVAN 

The 1974 baseball season isn't 
too far off and it appears the 
Red Sox have enhanced their 
Eastern Division chances 
considerably as a result of their 
off-season trades. 

There is little doubt the Sox 
strengthened their pitching staff 
immeasurably and, although 
there are still some question 
marks, the Boston team should 
be in contention for the division 
crown. 

The Sox added some topflight 
pitchers in Reggie Cleveland, 
Rick Wise and Diego Segui, 
obtained from the Cardinals; 
Dick Drago, from the Royals, 
and the veteran Juan Marichal, 
from the Giants. 

Cleveland and Wise are sure to 
join Luis Tiant and Bill Lee as 
starters and Drago also could 
start. It is expected Marichal will 
be a spot starter, going every five 
or six days or so. Segui is a fine 
relief pitcher and with him, Bob 
Bolin, Roger Moret and 
probably Drago and Dick Pole in 
the bull pen, the Sox are 
extremely well off for relievers. 

Moret, who developed into 
one of the team's top pitchers a 
year ago, ending with a 13-2 
record, will certainly start a lot 
of games as the year progresses. 

Bernie Carbo, obtained from 
the Cardinals with Wise in 
exchange for Reggie Smith and 
Ken Tatum, could be the Sox 
right fielder this year. 

Another valuable addition was 
that of veteran Dick McAuliffe 
from Detroit. Although Doug 
Griffin still looms as the Sox 
second baseman, we expect 
McAuliffe to see plenty of 
service there. 

Can Luis Aparicio, the Sox 
miracle man, start regularly this 
year at the age of 40? Most 
people didn't expect him to do 
so last summer but, as usual, the 
little wonder surprised everyone. 
However, age was beginning to 
creep up on him and many balls 
got by him that he would have 
eaten up in the past. 

It seems to us that Mario 
Guerrero will see a lot more 
action at shortstop. If Guerrero 
and Griffin are the keystone 
starters, can you think of a 
better pair of bench men than 
Aparicio and McAuliffe? 

Yaz expects to be at first base 
again but don't bet against Cecil 
Cooper making the grade this 
year, thus returning Yaz to left 
field. 

New Sox manager Darrell 
Johnson had Cooper last year at 
Pawtucket and the year before 
at Louisville and insists he is a 
major league player. 

With Cooper back under 
Johnson, the chances are good 



he will finally become the Sox 
first baseman. 

The big question at third base 
may be answered by the return 
of Rico Petrocelli, who last year 
said he wanted to leave Boston 
but has had second thoughts 
since. 

A real dark horse could be 
Terry Hughes, the 24-year old 
infieldet obtained from the 
Cardinals with Cleveland and 
Segui. "All his options have been 
used up so the Sox must keep 
him or- trade him. They sent 
Buddy Hunter to the Royals to' 
make room for Hughes and, who 
knows, he may become another 
John Kennedy. Hughes batted 
.287 at Tulsa last year before 
being brought up by the Cards 
and he is rated an excellent 
defensive player. 

Among the questions 
remaining: 

• CanOrlanda Cepeda repeat 
his brilliant year as the league's 
top designated hitter? In the 
past he has been known to fall 
down the year after he has had a 
great season. If he can't repeat, 
Tommy Harper could be the 
new DH, especially if Yaz 
returns to the outfield. 

, •Can Carlton Fisk return to 
the brilliance of his rookie 
season two years ago? Although 
he had a good 1973 season, his 
hitting dropped off badly and 
his throwing wasn't as sharp as 
his first year. 

• Can the amazing Luis Tiant 
have another of his superior 
seasons at 33 years of age? He 
again stunned everyone last year 
by winning 20 games and losing 
many tough decisions. He 
appears to get better with age. 

-Can Rick Miller hit 
consistently enough to replace 
Smith in center field? He is the 
best defensive outfielder on the 
team and did well at the bat last 
year, but still is not a Reggie 
Smith at the plate. 

All eyes will be on young Jim 
Rice, the Sox first draft choice 
two years ago, who will go to 
spring training following a 
sensational year at Bristol and 
Pawtucket. 

The 20-year old outfielder 
batted .317, bit 27 home runs 
and batted in 93 runs for Bristol. 
When brought up to Pawtucket, 
he helped spark the Paw Sox to 
the Little World Series title by 
batting .378 in 10 games, hitting 
four homers and knocking in 10 
runs. He may still be a year away 
but he looks like the brightest 
Sox prospect in many years. 

The Sox may still have too 
many questions to win the 
division crown from the Orioles, 
but it looks like a mighty 
interesting 1974 season at 
Fenway Park. 



'football is a team thing' NFL's top scorer says 



By HUGH BAKER 
Copley News Service 

LOS ANGELES - Winning 
the National Football League 
scoring title means nothing to 
David Ray, who won it. 

"How can you say I won 
it?" Ray said. "Did I win it 
anymore than Steve Preece, 
who was my holder all season, 
or Kenny Iman, who centered 
the ball back to Preece? How 
about the guys in the line, the 
ones who did the blocking so I 
could get the kicks off? 

"Don't talk to me about in- 
dividual scoring champions. 
The only time you win any- 



thing is when the team wins 
something. I'm much prouder 
of our 12-2 season than I am of 
winning some individual 
prize." 

Acting as if he resented the 
whole wretched business, Ray 
launched into a discussion 
about football being a team 
sport, not one designed for 
rugged individualists. 

Nevertheless, Ray's 130 
points on 30 field goals and 40 
conversions after touchdowns 
did make him the top scorer in 
the entire NFL. His nearest 
contender was Roy Gerela of 
the Pittsburgh Steelers in the 
American Football Confer- 



ence. Gerela wound up with 
123 points, which topped Garo 
Yepremian's 112 for the 
Miami Dolphins. 

Ray's nearest rival in the 
NFC was Nick Mike-Mayer of 
the Atlanta Falcons. Mike- 
Mayer only had 112 to Ray's 
130. 

The pride David Ray feels 
in the Rams' 12-2 season and 
capture of the NFC West divi- 
sion title is genuine. 

For he was one of the most 
disillusioned Rams at the end 
of the 1972 season when the 
club turned in its worst record 
( fi-7-1 ) He was not averse to 
letting people know he was 



unhappy either. 

"Yes," he said, "we were in 
the playoffs. . . . But I tell you 
something — we should have 
won the division last year and 
the year before that, too. 

"We should have had three 
straight years of winning the 
division. We'd beat the tar out 
of San Francisco during the 
season, but it was always 
'Frisco who walked away with 
the title. 

"There was no excuse for 
it." 

He credits Ram head coach 
Chuck Knox more than any- 
one else for the turnabout this 
year. Knox replaced Tom 



Prothro, who coached the 
team in 1971 and 72. 

"I'm not putting all the 
blame on Prothro for what 
happened last year either," 
Ray said. "Part of it was his 
fault, I think, but some of it 
was our own. 

"To me, Prothro is a good 
coach, but he didn't generate 
a winning spirit in us from the 
first, like Knox did. As for the 
players, I don't think we re- 
sponded to Prothro the way 
we did to Knox. 

"Before training camp ever 
started last summer, I could 
have told you we were going 
to have a winning team. 



Thursday, January 31 , 1974 Quincy Sun Page 25 , 



8 Amity Aides Get Acquainted 



Eight Amitv Aides from 
Europe and Latin America, 
began their association with the 
Quincy Public Schools 
They met with Quincy's foreign 
language teachers in an 
orientation session in the 
Foreign Language Resource 
Center at Quincy High School. 

The eight Amity Aides also 
met with School Supt. Dr. 
Lawrence Creedon and other 
administrative leaders. 

Three are Spanish-speaking 
aides: Hilda Jimenez from 
Mexico, Hector Aprile from 
Uruguay and Fresia'de Vidaurre 
from Bolivia. Three are 
French-speaking aides: 
Pierre-Alaine De Chalus, 
Marie-Pascale Gru and 
Jean-Pierre Genet, all from 
France. Two German-speaking 
aides are: Ruth Nohl and Esther 



Oettli from Switzerland. 

These aides, who are young 
university graduates, are sent by 
The Amity Institute of Del Mar, 
Calif. They will be working with 
all the Foreign Language 
Teachers and students in 
Quincy's secondary schools and 
will enrich the cultural and 
conversational activities of these 
groups. The aides will also offer 
cultural presentations during the 
International Festival days in 
April to Quincy's Elementary 
Students. 

Purpose of the Amity Aide 
Program, which functions in 
public school systems and 
colleges throughout America is 
to promote international 
friendship and understanding. 

The eight Amity Aides who 
will be associated with the 
Quincy Public Schools until 



June 1, will be living with the 
following host families: Mr. and 
Mrs. Jack Silverstein, Mr. and 
Mrs. Melvin Braveman, Mr. and 
Mrs. Dominic D'Arcangelo, Mr. 
and Mrs. Joseph Feeney , Mr. and 
Mrs. Robert Blake, Mr. and Mrs. 
Rubin Sugarman, Dr. and Mrs. 
Donald Reed, Mr. and Mrs. 
Charles White, Mr. and Mrs. 
Joseph Schwartz and Mr. and 
Mrs. William Myers. 

Chairman of the Amity Aide 
Host Families is Mrs. Inez 
Silverstein. Co-chairmen of the 
Amity Aide Program are: 
Margaret Crowley and Maria 
D'Arcangelo who are Spanish 
teachers at Central Junior High 
and North Quincy High Schools. 

Supervisor of the Program is 
Ellis J. Swartz, Coordinator of 
Foreign Languages for Quincy 
Public Schools. 



League Of Women Voters Plan *Open Dialogue 9 



An 'Open Dialogue' with 
School Administrators, 
sponsored by the League of 
Women Voters of Quincy will be 
held Wednesday, Feb. 6, at 7:30 
p.m. in the Media Center of 
Quincy High School. 

A panel of school 
administrators, League and 
School Committee 
representatives will discuss 
recommendations made in the 
recently completed League 
evaluation of the Individualized 
Learning Process in the Quincy 
schools. 

The survey included 
background meetings with 
school personnel, a tour of 
several schools utilizing various 
forms of individualization, 
administration of a 



questionnaire to fifth grade 
pupils, their parents, and the 
classroom teachers in 10 
elementary schools, and results 
discussed at unit meetings. 

Recommendations made to 
the School Committee, based on 
the results of the questionnaires 
are: 

• More teacher aides in the 
schools - paid, and preferably 
trained. 

• More counsellors at the 
elementary level. 

• More teacher training for 
the individualized learning 
process. 

• Improved communications 
between parents and teachers - 
home and school. 

• More emphasis on basic 
skills, such as spelling. 



The meeting Feb. 6, will 
consist of a panel presentation 
on each of the recommendations 
and round table discussions with 
the panelists. Participants will 
include: School committee 
vice-chairman Charles Sweeny, 
Richard Chrystal, director of 
staff development; John 
Osterman , assistant 
superintendent for personnel; 
Carl Deyesso, coordinator for 
language arts; Dr. Carol Lee 
Griffin, director of pupil 
personnel services; Merle 
Sawyer, principal Massachusetts 
Fields School and League 
Representatives Vivian Kolodny 
and Janet Poole. 

The meeting is open to the 
public. 



3 Quincy Students To Receive Brotherhood Awards 



Three students from Quincy's 
three high schools will be among 
those receiving awards Feb. 3 at 
the Jewish War Veterans 20th 
annual Brotherhood Breakfast at 
Chateau de Ville, Saugus. 

The three, who will be 
presented the "Classmates 
Today-Neighbors Tomorrow 
Brotherhood Awards" are: 

Diane Hernon, 65 
Buckingham Rd, North Quincy 
High School; Barry Gilbert, 249 
Governors Rd, Quincy High 
School and Stephen M. Lawlor, 
86 South Walnut St., Quincy 



Vocational Technical School. 

Announcement of their 
selection was made by Ralph 
Paull, commander of Quincy 
Post Jewish War Veterans. 

"Classmates Today 
Neighbors Tomorrow" is a 
human relations project of the 
Department of Massachusetts 
Jewish War Veterans, its JWV 
Posts and The Northeast Region 
of the National Conference of 
Christians and Jews. 

It is a brotherhood program 
for high school students as part 



of their own educational 
program. It is a living program 
developed by the students 
themselves through their 
Student Councils or governing 
bodies to select one student who 
represents the entire school's 
idea of brotherhood. 

Over 100 High Schools in the 
state are participating and each 
school submits a resume of his 
selectee. The Northeast Region 
of The National Conference of 
Christians and Jews selects 3 
statewide winners and 3 
honorable mention winners. 



Point-Webster Advisory Board To Hear Dr. Griffin 



The Feb. 4 PTA/Parent 
Advisory Board of the Quincy 
Point-Daniel Webster School 
Complex will present the fourth 
program of a series designed to 
develop awareness and 
understanding of the school and 
school system. 

Guest speaker will be Dr. 
Carol Lee Griffin, Director of 



Pupil Personnel Services for the 
Quincy Public Schools. Dr. 
Griffin will present an overview 
of guidance services available in 
the school system. The meeting 
will begin at 7:30 p.m. in the 
school media center. 

Previous meetings have 
focused on the Student Centered 



Learning Sustem, Guidance 

programs available in the 

Complex and the Learning 
Disabilities Program. 

The March meeting, to be 
held on Monday, March 4, will 
present Dr. Luleen Anderson of 
the South Shore Mental Health 
Center. 



John McGowan To Head 
Quincy Heart Fund Campaign 



John W. McGowan has been 
named general chairman for the 
1 974 Heart Fund Campaign in 
Quincy, announces Atty. Joseph 
R. Welch, Southeast Chapter 
Heart Fund Chairman. 

He will be responsible for the 
overall guidance and direction of 
the campaign, which takes place 
during February. Chairmen are 

Ronald Batson 
CG Ensign 

Ronald W. Batson, son of Mrs. 
Bertha M. Batson of 28 Spring 
St., and whose wife Patricia is 
the daughter of John E. Maguire 
of 1 1 38 Sea St., both of Quincy, 
was commissioned an ensign in 
the Coast Guard upon 
graduating from Officer 
Candidate School at the Coast 
Guard Reserve Training Center 
at Yorktown, Va. 



being recruited for the following 
committees: Special Gifts, 
Business and Industry, Clubs and 
Organizations, and Special 
Events. 

Heart Sunday will take place 
Sunday, Feb. 24. 

McGowan lives at 67 Bigelow 
St. with his wife, Patricia, and 
two children, John and Melissa. 



He is a Trust Officer with the 
National Shawmut Bank of 
Boston. McGowan is a Trustee 
of the Museum of 
Transportation and is a member 
of the Massachusetts Bar 
Association, Boston' Bar 
Association, Neighborhood Club 
of Quincy, and the Boston 
Estate and Business Planning 
Council. 



$70,537 In New Wiring 



City Wire Inspector William F. 
Pitts reports that 97 permits for 
an estimated $70,537 worth of 
wiring were issued by. his 
department in December. 

Fees collecte